PDA

View Full Version : Homemade Power Rack


JayB
June 27th 04, 03:11 AM
I am going to build a power rack using wood and would like to know if anyone
has any schematics for one that's proven to be durable and support heavy
weights.

What type of wood did you use?

In my usenet search I found a steprack:
http://www.shep.ca/pages/steprack.html. Has anyone built one and used it?
What's your opinion on this?

I'm open for any advice anyone has to give.

Thanks,

--

JayB

Lee Michaels
June 27th 04, 03:26 AM
"JayB" > wrote in message
...
> I am going to build a power rack using wood and would like to know if
anyone
> has any schematics for one that's proven to be durable and support heavy
> weights.
>
> What type of wood did you use?
>
> In my usenet search I found a steprack:
> http://www.shep.ca/pages/steprack.html. Has anyone built one and used it?
> What's your opinion on this?
>
> I'm open for any advice anyone has to give.
>

I have commented on both step racks and wood power racks in this newsgroup
many times. Google for these comments.

I was the person who drew the drawings that you referenced above. I have
built step racks many times. These were very common before power racks
became readily available.

Short answer, don't build the wood power rack. I have built several of them.
I have also destroyed a couple of them and know others that have have been
destroyed as well. Wood splits. It is not safe to drill holes through wood
and drop a weight on it. The better the wood (high quality, straight grain),
the easier it splits.

The only safe wood power rack I have ever seen had thick metal strips
attached to it with holes drilled in them, It was essentialy a metal power
rack with wood holding it together. If you dropped a weight, the metal would
catch it.

If you are going to use wood, just make a step rack and brace it well. Make
it fit you. Or just buy a metal power rack. Some of the exercise equipment
stores take trade ins. I have seen power racks down to the $125 range on
these trade ins. They were ugly, but a functional power rack.

I built my first wood power rack over 35 years ago. I built several more
after that. I was young and dumb. None of those racks survived. They all
died. Most ended up in a fireplace or stove. The only reason nobody was
injured seriously was a combination of luck and the fact that the wood only
split on one side.

Lee Michaels

Lee Michaels
June 27th 04, 03:26 AM
"JayB" > wrote in message
...
> I am going to build a power rack using wood and would like to know if
anyone
> has any schematics for one that's proven to be durable and support heavy
> weights.
>
> What type of wood did you use?
>
> In my usenet search I found a steprack:
> http://www.shep.ca/pages/steprack.html. Has anyone built one and used it?
> What's your opinion on this?
>
> I'm open for any advice anyone has to give.
>

I have commented on both step racks and wood power racks in this newsgroup
many times. Google for these comments.

I was the person who drew the drawings that you referenced above. I have
built step racks many times. These were very common before power racks
became readily available.

Short answer, don't build the wood power rack. I have built several of them.
I have also destroyed a couple of them and know others that have have been
destroyed as well. Wood splits. It is not safe to drill holes through wood
and drop a weight on it. The better the wood (high quality, straight grain),
the easier it splits.

The only safe wood power rack I have ever seen had thick metal strips
attached to it with holes drilled in them, It was essentialy a metal power
rack with wood holding it together. If you dropped a weight, the metal would
catch it.

If you are going to use wood, just make a step rack and brace it well. Make
it fit you. Or just buy a metal power rack. Some of the exercise equipment
stores take trade ins. I have seen power racks down to the $125 range on
these trade ins. They were ugly, but a functional power rack.

I built my first wood power rack over 35 years ago. I built several more
after that. I was young and dumb. None of those racks survived. They all
died. Most ended up in a fireplace or stove. The only reason nobody was
injured seriously was a combination of luck and the fact that the wood only
split on one side.

Lee Michaels

JayB
June 27th 04, 08:24 AM
"Lee Michaels" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s53...
>
> "JayB" > wrote in message
> ...
> > I am going to build a power rack using wood and would like to know if
> anyone
> > has any schematics for one that's proven to be durable and support heavy
> > weights.
> >
> > What type of wood did you use?
> >
> > In my usenet search I found a steprack:
> > http://www.shep.ca/pages/steprack.html. Has anyone built one and used
it?
> > What's your opinion on this?
> >
> > I'm open for any advice anyone has to give.
> >
>
> I have commented on both step racks and wood power racks in this newsgroup
> many times. Google for these comments.

Actually, I did search the archives on Google and found many of your
comments. This is how I found your drawing of the step racks.
:-)

> I was the person who drew the drawings that you referenced above. I have
> built step racks many times. These were very common before power racks
> became readily available.
>
> Short answer, don't build the wood power rack. I have built several of
them.
> I have also destroyed a couple of them and know others that have have been
> destroyed as well. Wood splits. It is not safe to drill holes through wood
> and drop a weight on it. The better the wood (high quality, straight
grain),
> the easier it splits.
>
> The only safe wood power rack I have ever seen had thick metal strips
> attached to it with holes drilled in them, It was essentialy a metal power
> rack with wood holding it together. If you dropped a weight, the metal
would
> catch it.

I suppose the benefit of this would be that you almost get the strength of
the metal without having to weld.

> If you are going to use wood, just make a step rack and brace it well.
Make
> it fit you. Or just buy a metal power rack. Some of the exercise
equipment
> stores take trade ins. I have seen power racks down to the $125 range on
> these trade ins. They were ugly, but a functional power rack.

Can your step rack accomodate both the flat bench press and incline bench
press?

If not, perhaps it would still be affordable to build the squat portion of
the step rack using wood and the bench portion using metal square tubing
that would allow it to adjust to different heights based on the type of
bench press being done.

Do you think a pull-up bar could be easily added to the step rack? Maybe
using 4x4s and a 2 inch pipe?

> I built my first wood power rack over 35 years ago. I built several more
> after that. I was young and dumb. None of those racks survived. They all
> died. Most ended up in a fireplace or stove. The only reason nobody was
> injured seriously was a combination of luck and the fact that the wood
only
> split on one side.

--

JayB

JayB
June 27th 04, 08:24 AM
"Lee Michaels" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s53...
>
> "JayB" > wrote in message
> ...
> > I am going to build a power rack using wood and would like to know if
> anyone
> > has any schematics for one that's proven to be durable and support heavy
> > weights.
> >
> > What type of wood did you use?
> >
> > In my usenet search I found a steprack:
> > http://www.shep.ca/pages/steprack.html. Has anyone built one and used
it?
> > What's your opinion on this?
> >
> > I'm open for any advice anyone has to give.
> >
>
> I have commented on both step racks and wood power racks in this newsgroup
> many times. Google for these comments.

Actually, I did search the archives on Google and found many of your
comments. This is how I found your drawing of the step racks.
:-)

> I was the person who drew the drawings that you referenced above. I have
> built step racks many times. These were very common before power racks
> became readily available.
>
> Short answer, don't build the wood power rack. I have built several of
them.
> I have also destroyed a couple of them and know others that have have been
> destroyed as well. Wood splits. It is not safe to drill holes through wood
> and drop a weight on it. The better the wood (high quality, straight
grain),
> the easier it splits.
>
> The only safe wood power rack I have ever seen had thick metal strips
> attached to it with holes drilled in them, It was essentialy a metal power
> rack with wood holding it together. If you dropped a weight, the metal
would
> catch it.

I suppose the benefit of this would be that you almost get the strength of
the metal without having to weld.

> If you are going to use wood, just make a step rack and brace it well.
Make
> it fit you. Or just buy a metal power rack. Some of the exercise
equipment
> stores take trade ins. I have seen power racks down to the $125 range on
> these trade ins. They were ugly, but a functional power rack.

Can your step rack accomodate both the flat bench press and incline bench
press?

If not, perhaps it would still be affordable to build the squat portion of
the step rack using wood and the bench portion using metal square tubing
that would allow it to adjust to different heights based on the type of
bench press being done.

Do you think a pull-up bar could be easily added to the step rack? Maybe
using 4x4s and a 2 inch pipe?

> I built my first wood power rack over 35 years ago. I built several more
> after that. I was young and dumb. None of those racks survived. They all
> died. Most ended up in a fireplace or stove. The only reason nobody was
> injured seriously was a combination of luck and the fact that the wood
only
> split on one side.

--

JayB

Lee Michaels
June 27th 04, 06:32 PM
"JayB" > wrote in message
...
> "Lee Michaels" > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]_s53...
> >
> >
> > The only safe wood power rack I have ever seen had thick metal strips
> > attached to it with holes drilled in them, It was essentialy a metal
power
> > rack with wood holding it together. If you dropped a weight, the metal
> would
> > catch it.
>
> I suppose the benefit of this would be that you almost get the strength of
> the metal without having to weld.
>

It was also quite attractive. Imagine a lot of quality wood peices, all of
them built and finished to furntiture standards. With weights, etc. A
diiferent kind of home gym.


>
> Can your step rack accomodate both the flat bench press and incline bench
> press?
>
> If not, perhaps it would still be affordable to build the squat portion of
> the step rack using wood and the bench portion using metal square tubing
> that would allow it to adjust to different heights based on the type of
> bench press being done.
>
> Do you think a pull-up bar could be easily added to the step rack? Maybe
> using 4x4s and a 2 inch pipe?
>

I have not had time to prepare an information sheet about step racks. But
everyone want to screw them up some how.

1. This is not MY step rack. There were many thousands of these built (both
commercial and hombuilt) many years ago. I did not invent them nor claim
ownership of them.

2. Step racks can be made out of any material and in any configuration you
want. If you want a place to do incline presses, build it in. Or do what I
have done before, build an incline bench to fit the rack.

3. You can build anything into it or onto it. If you want to install a
pistol target, a punching bag or a sexual attachement to it, do it. You see,
it is home made and DESIGNED!! Build whatever the hell you want on it. I am
not your mommy and you don't need my permission.

4. The whole idea behind this is that it is cheap and fast. As soon as you
start trying to include refrigerators, hot tub, etc, it is no longer cost or
time effective. Just buy a power rack.

5. These step racks are only suitable for folks who are familiar with
hammers, saws, building things and can do so without injuring themeselves.
Some people can build the thing, but they can't do any of the logistical
stuf. The can't buy lumber or nails. Other people can't do the basic design
work, even with a drawing in front of them.

6. Stepracks are simple and straightforward. When you make enough changes to
them that it becomes complicated, you have defeated the purpose of the
steprack. If you are in love with adjustability, it is possible to build a
special wood rack that relys on stacking wood to acheive this. Again, it is
a complicated add on to the steprack. You figure it out. I don't dare
publish anything like this. It is too easy for folks to screw it up.

Lee Michaels

Lee Michaels
June 27th 04, 06:32 PM
"JayB" > wrote in message
...
> "Lee Michaels" > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]_s53...
> >
> >
> > The only safe wood power rack I have ever seen had thick metal strips
> > attached to it with holes drilled in them, It was essentialy a metal
power
> > rack with wood holding it together. If you dropped a weight, the metal
> would
> > catch it.
>
> I suppose the benefit of this would be that you almost get the strength of
> the metal without having to weld.
>

It was also quite attractive. Imagine a lot of quality wood peices, all of
them built and finished to furntiture standards. With weights, etc. A
diiferent kind of home gym.


>
> Can your step rack accomodate both the flat bench press and incline bench
> press?
>
> If not, perhaps it would still be affordable to build the squat portion of
> the step rack using wood and the bench portion using metal square tubing
> that would allow it to adjust to different heights based on the type of
> bench press being done.
>
> Do you think a pull-up bar could be easily added to the step rack? Maybe
> using 4x4s and a 2 inch pipe?
>

I have not had time to prepare an information sheet about step racks. But
everyone want to screw them up some how.

1. This is not MY step rack. There were many thousands of these built (both
commercial and hombuilt) many years ago. I did not invent them nor claim
ownership of them.

2. Step racks can be made out of any material and in any configuration you
want. If you want a place to do incline presses, build it in. Or do what I
have done before, build an incline bench to fit the rack.

3. You can build anything into it or onto it. If you want to install a
pistol target, a punching bag or a sexual attachement to it, do it. You see,
it is home made and DESIGNED!! Build whatever the hell you want on it. I am
not your mommy and you don't need my permission.

4. The whole idea behind this is that it is cheap and fast. As soon as you
start trying to include refrigerators, hot tub, etc, it is no longer cost or
time effective. Just buy a power rack.

5. These step racks are only suitable for folks who are familiar with
hammers, saws, building things and can do so without injuring themeselves.
Some people can build the thing, but they can't do any of the logistical
stuf. The can't buy lumber or nails. Other people can't do the basic design
work, even with a drawing in front of them.

6. Stepracks are simple and straightforward. When you make enough changes to
them that it becomes complicated, you have defeated the purpose of the
steprack. If you are in love with adjustability, it is possible to build a
special wood rack that relys on stacking wood to acheive this. Again, it is
a complicated add on to the steprack. You figure it out. I don't dare
publish anything like this. It is too easy for folks to screw it up.

Lee Michaels

JayB
June 27th 04, 08:53 PM
"Lee Michaels" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s54...
>
> "JayB" > wrote in message
> ...
> > "Lee Michaels" > wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]_s53...
> > >
> > >
> > > The only safe wood power rack I have ever seen had thick metal strips
> > > attached to it with holes drilled in them, It was essentialy a metal
> power
> > > rack with wood holding it together. If you dropped a weight, the metal
> > would
> > > catch it.
> >
> > I suppose the benefit of this would be that you almost get the strength
of
> > the metal without having to weld.
> >
>
> It was also quite attractive. Imagine a lot of quality wood peices, all of
> them built and finished to furntiture standards. With weights, etc. A
> diiferent kind of home gym.
>
>
> >
> > Can your step rack accomodate both the flat bench press and incline
bench
> > press?
> >
> > If not, perhaps it would still be affordable to build the squat portion
of
> > the step rack using wood and the bench portion using metal square tubing
> > that would allow it to adjust to different heights based on the type of
> > bench press being done.
> >
> > Do you think a pull-up bar could be easily added to the step rack? Maybe
> > using 4x4s and a 2 inch pipe?
> >
>
> I have not had time to prepare an information sheet about step racks. But
> everyone want to screw them up some how.
>
> 1. This is not MY step rack. There were many thousands of these built
(both
> commercial and hombuilt) many years ago. I did not invent them nor claim
> ownership of them.

I know you didn't invent them. I just thought that the design I looked at
was your personal design (it says drawing by Lee Michaels).

> 2. Step racks can be made out of any material and in any configuration you
> want. If you want a place to do incline presses, build it in. Or do what I
> have done before, build an incline bench to fit the rack.

Good idea!

> 3. You can build anything into it or onto it. If you want to install a
> pistol target, a punching bag or a sexual attachement to it, do it. You
see,
> it is home made and DESIGNED!! Build whatever the hell you want on it. I
am
> not your mommy and you don't need my permission.

I wasn't going to ask for your permission. I'm only looking for opinions and
advice.
:-)

> 4. The whole idea behind this is that it is cheap and fast. As soon as you
> start trying to include refrigerators, hot tub, etc, it is no longer cost
or
> time effective. Just buy a power rack.
>
> 5. These step racks are only suitable for folks who are familiar with
> hammers, saws, building things and can do so without injuring themeselves.
> Some people can build the thing, but they can't do any of the logistical
> stuf. The can't buy lumber or nails. Other people can't do the basic
design
> work, even with a drawing in front of them.
>
> 6. Stepracks are simple and straightforward. When you make enough changes
to
> them that it becomes complicated, you have defeated the purpose of the
> steprack. If you are in love with adjustability, it is possible to build a
> special wood rack that relys on stacking wood to acheive this. Again, it
is
> a complicated add on to the steprack. You figure it out. I don't dare
> publish anything like this. It is too easy for folks to screw it up.
>
> Lee Michaels
>
>
>

JayB
June 27th 04, 08:53 PM
"Lee Michaels" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s54...
>
> "JayB" > wrote in message
> ...
> > "Lee Michaels" > wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]_s53...
> > >
> > >
> > > The only safe wood power rack I have ever seen had thick metal strips
> > > attached to it with holes drilled in them, It was essentialy a metal
> power
> > > rack with wood holding it together. If you dropped a weight, the metal
> > would
> > > catch it.
> >
> > I suppose the benefit of this would be that you almost get the strength
of
> > the metal without having to weld.
> >
>
> It was also quite attractive. Imagine a lot of quality wood peices, all of
> them built and finished to furntiture standards. With weights, etc. A
> diiferent kind of home gym.
>
>
> >
> > Can your step rack accomodate both the flat bench press and incline
bench
> > press?
> >
> > If not, perhaps it would still be affordable to build the squat portion
of
> > the step rack using wood and the bench portion using metal square tubing
> > that would allow it to adjust to different heights based on the type of
> > bench press being done.
> >
> > Do you think a pull-up bar could be easily added to the step rack? Maybe
> > using 4x4s and a 2 inch pipe?
> >
>
> I have not had time to prepare an information sheet about step racks. But
> everyone want to screw them up some how.
>
> 1. This is not MY step rack. There were many thousands of these built
(both
> commercial and hombuilt) many years ago. I did not invent them nor claim
> ownership of them.

I know you didn't invent them. I just thought that the design I looked at
was your personal design (it says drawing by Lee Michaels).

> 2. Step racks can be made out of any material and in any configuration you
> want. If you want a place to do incline presses, build it in. Or do what I
> have done before, build an incline bench to fit the rack.

Good idea!

> 3. You can build anything into it or onto it. If you want to install a
> pistol target, a punching bag or a sexual attachement to it, do it. You
see,
> it is home made and DESIGNED!! Build whatever the hell you want on it. I
am
> not your mommy and you don't need my permission.

I wasn't going to ask for your permission. I'm only looking for opinions and
advice.
:-)

> 4. The whole idea behind this is that it is cheap and fast. As soon as you
> start trying to include refrigerators, hot tub, etc, it is no longer cost
or
> time effective. Just buy a power rack.
>
> 5. These step racks are only suitable for folks who are familiar with
> hammers, saws, building things and can do so without injuring themeselves.
> Some people can build the thing, but they can't do any of the logistical
> stuf. The can't buy lumber or nails. Other people can't do the basic
design
> work, even with a drawing in front of them.
>
> 6. Stepracks are simple and straightforward. When you make enough changes
to
> them that it becomes complicated, you have defeated the purpose of the
> steprack. If you are in love with adjustability, it is possible to build a
> special wood rack that relys on stacking wood to acheive this. Again, it
is
> a complicated add on to the steprack. You figure it out. I don't dare
> publish anything like this. It is too easy for folks to screw it up.
>
> Lee Michaels
>
>
>