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User
July 23rd 04, 06:26 AM
I keep hearing everyone talk about bench press shirts.

Whatsit? What do they do?

Kromagnon
July 23rd 04, 06:57 AM
User wrote:
> I keep hearing everyone talk about bench press shirts.
>
> Whatsit? What do they do?

They are very tight and don't stretch. Very difficult to put
on. They keep the upper body very tight so you can lift more.
I use a deadlift suit that works the same way.

http://www.inzernet.com/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=05_PHENOM


K

User
July 23rd 04, 07:13 AM
> They are very tight and don't stretch. Very difficult to put
> on. They keep the upper body very tight so you can lift more.
> I use a deadlift suit that works the same way.

Wow. Thanks. This is for competition only, right? I mean, people don't
use this for training, do they? Throw on the shirt and do four sets?

DanL
July 23rd 04, 07:25 AM
"User" > wrote in message
...

> Wow. Thanks. This is for competition only, right? I mean, people don't
> use this for training, do they? Throw on the shirt and do four sets?

Pretty much for competition. But you need to practice with it, you don't
just want to use it only at a meet. Most people who use one will start
wearing it several weeks out from the contest. I wouldn't do 4 sets of 10
with it but I do multiple singles and doubles in my workouts with it on.

User
July 23rd 04, 07:30 AM
Thanks for the info you guys.

John M. Williams
July 23rd 04, 07:52 AM
"User" > wrote:

>> They are very tight and don't stretch. Very difficult to put
>> on. They keep the upper body very tight so you can lift more.
>> I use a deadlift suit that works the same way.
>
>Wow. Thanks. This is for competition only, right? I mean, people don't
>use this for training, do they? Throw on the shirt and do four sets?

You had better train with it more than just a couple of times if you
plan to compete with it. I learned that the hard way.

That said, you had also better have some pals who are willing to
squeeze you into it each time. I've heard the Titan shirts, with some
effort, can be put on by yourself. An Inzer absolutely requires
another person to help you, and if it's particularly tight, it will
take two others.

DanL
July 23rd 04, 08:36 AM
"John M. Williams" > wrote in message
...

> That said, you had also better have some pals who are willing to
> squeeze you into it each time. I've heard the Titan shirts, with some
> effort, can be put on by yourself. An Inzer absolutely requires
> another person to help you, and if it's particularly tight, it will
> take two others.

My last meet I was helping a guy get OUT of his Inzer. It as ridiculous. He
was nearly exhausted by the time we were done. The Titans do go on easy. I
have one of those and I really only need someone to pull it down for me.

Jon C
July 23rd 04, 08:54 AM
Kromagnon wrote:

> User wrote:
>
>>I keep hearing everyone talk about bench press shirts.
>>
>>Whatsit? What do they do?
>
>
> They are very tight and don't stretch. Very difficult to put
> on. They keep the upper body very tight so you can lift more.
> I use a deadlift suit that works the same way.
>
> http://www.inzernet.com/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=05_PHENOM
>
>
> K

Wow, weird. Do those really work?

Kromagnon
July 23rd 04, 09:02 AM
Jon C wrote:
> Kromagnon wrote:
>
>> User wrote:
>>
>>> I keep hearing everyone talk about bench press shirts.
>>>
>>> Whatsit? What do they do?
>>
>>
>> They are very tight and don't stretch. Very difficult to
put
>> on. They keep the upper body very tight so you can lift
more.
>> I use a deadlift suit that works the same way.
>>
>> http://www.inzernet.com/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=05_PHENOM
>>
>>
>> K
>
> Wow, weird. Do those really work?

Yes, they work very well. The double thickness shirts and
suits work so well that many lifting organizations don't allow
them.


K

Jeff Finlayson
July 23rd 04, 02:14 PM
John M. Williams wrote:
> "User" wrote:
>
>>>They are very tight and don't stretch. Very difficult to put
>>>on. They keep the upper body very tight so you can lift more.
>>>I use a deadlift suit that works the same way.

A 'deadlift suit' or erector shirt is more like wearing a
bench shirt backwards.

>>Wow. Thanks. This is for competition only, right? I mean, people don't
>>use this for training, do they? Throw on the shirt and do four sets?
>
> You had better train with it more than just a couple of times if you
> plan to compete with it. I learned that the hard way.
>
> That said, you had also better have some pals who are willing to
> squeeze you into it each time. I've heard the Titan shirts, with some
> effort, can be put on by yourself. An Inzer absolutely requires
> another person to help you, and if it's particularly tight, it will
> take two others.

Depends on how tight the shirt is.

Inzer has the stretchy back option on the phenom similar to
the Titan Fury. Crain now has this option too. Makes them
easier to get on and off.

TX_Dude
July 23rd 04, 04:12 PM
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"DanL" > wrote in message
...

> Pretty much for competition. But you need to practice with it, you don't
> just want to use it only at a meet. Most people who use one will start
> wearing it several weeks out from the contest. I wouldn't do 4 sets of 10
> with it but I do multiple singles and doubles in my workouts with it on.
>

What is the best shirt for someone who is 6-2 250 lbs
and benches just below the nipple?

Bench is currently around 425 RAW
I've have NO idea what shirt to buy.

I'm thinking of competing in the WABDL and APA.



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John Hanson
July 23rd 04, 04:46 PM
On Thu, 22 Jul 2004 23:13:50 -0700, "User" > wrote in
misc.fitness.weights:

>> They are very tight and don't stretch. Very difficult to put
>> on. They keep the upper body very tight so you can lift more.
>> I use a deadlift suit that works the same way.
>
>Wow. Thanks. This is for competition only, right? I mean, people don't
>use this for training, do they? Throw on the shirt and do four sets?
>
Shirts are becoming more and more common in training. The top Open
lifters will train in shirts about half the time. I just put my shirt
on for the first time since my last competition which was on May 1
though. But I plan on wearing it a lot more as my next real meet will
be August 28 (Twin Cities Open).

It's also becoming more common that competitors raw benches are
dropping while their shirted bench is increasing. Paul Wong for
instance says that he used to be able to bench 315 for 5 or 6 reps but
can only do about 2 or 3 now. He benches about 400 at 148 with a
shirt. Triceps have become very important in competition now. Paul's
are freaking huge.

Regarding the Titan Fury, mine was very easy to get on. It's a bit
harder now that my arm and shoulder size have increased but it's still
pretty easy to get on. The Fury is only tight in the arms whereas the
Inzers (except for the very latest ones...RageX) are tight everywhere.

Jeff Finlayson
July 23rd 04, 04:58 PM
TX_Dude wrote:
> "DanL" wrote:
>
>>Pretty much for competition. But you need to practice with it, you don't
>>just want to use it only at a meet. Most people who use one will start
>>wearing it several weeks out from the contest. I wouldn't do 4 sets of 10
>>with it but I do multiple singles and doubles in my workouts with it on.
>
> What is the best shirt for someone who is 6-2 250 lbs
> and benches just below the nipple?

Probably a crain shirt. Titan fury will touch lower and Inzer
shirts seem to touch higher (closer to collarbone).

> Bench is currently around 425 RAW
> I've have NO idea what shirt to buy.
>
> I'm thinking of competing in the WABDL and APA.

John Hanson
July 23rd 04, 05:17 PM
On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 15:58:08 GMT, Jeff Finlayson
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

>TX_Dude wrote:
>> "DanL" wrote:
>>
>>>Pretty much for competition. But you need to practice with it, you don't
>>>just want to use it only at a meet. Most people who use one will start
>>>wearing it several weeks out from the contest. I wouldn't do 4 sets of 10
>>>with it but I do multiple singles and doubles in my workouts with it on.
>>
>> What is the best shirt for someone who is 6-2 250 lbs
>> and benches just below the nipple?
>
>Probably a crain shirt. Titan fury will touch lower and Inzer
>shirts seem to touch higher (closer to collarbone).

My Titan's groove is just below the nipple which is right where I like
it.

>
>> Bench is currently around 425 RAW
>> I've have NO idea what shirt to buy.
>>
>> I'm thinking of competing in the WABDL and APA.

Keith Hobman
July 23rd 04, 05:17 PM
In article >, Jeff Finlayson
> wrote:

> TX_Dude wrote:
> > "DanL" wrote:
> >
> >>Pretty much for competition. But you need to practice with it, you don't
> >>just want to use it only at a meet. Most people who use one will start
> >>wearing it several weeks out from the contest. I wouldn't do 4 sets of 10
> >>with it but I do multiple singles and doubles in my workouts with it on.
> >
> > What is the best shirt for someone who is 6-2 250 lbs
> > and benches just below the nipple?
>
> Probably a crain shirt. Titan fury will touch lower and Inzer
> shirts seem to touch higher (closer to collarbone).
>
> > Bench is currently around 425 RAW
> > I've have NO idea what shirt to buy.
> >
> > I'm thinking of competing in the WABDL and APA.

If you are competing in those organizations the best shirt is probably the
Metal Pro shirt.

Dave Tate now carries them.

http://www.elitefts.com/

Basically you build your own shirt with Metal. I'd suggest double poly for
a starter, but you may want to go more radical.

--
Dawn's cold kiss calls me
Forth I creep, blindly stumbling
Joy: Morning workouts.
Hugh Beyer's 'Haiku On Returning To Weights'

Jeff Finlayson
July 23rd 04, 05:31 PM
Jeff Finlayson wrote:
> TX_Dude wrote:
>> "DanL" wrote:
>>
>>> Pretty much for competition. But you need to practice with it, you don't
>>> just want to use it only at a meet. Most people who use one will start
>>> wearing it several weeks out from the contest. I wouldn't do 4 sets
>>> of 10 with it but I do multiple singles and doubles in my workouts
>>> with it on.
>>
>> What is the best shirt for someone who is 6-2 250 lbs
>> and benches just below the nipple?
>
> Probably a crain shirt. Titan fury will touch lower and Inzer
> shirts seem to touch higher (closer to collarbone).

Actually, right below nipples should work for an Inzer
shirts as well.

>> Bench is currently around 425 RAW
>> I've have NO idea what shirt to buy.
>> I'm thinking of competing in the WABDL and APA.

Will
July 23rd 04, 05:42 PM
In article >,
Jeff Finlayson > wrote:

> John M. Williams wrote:
> > "User" wrote:
> >
> >>>They are very tight and don't stretch. Very difficult to put
> >>>on. They keep the upper body very tight so you can lift more.
> >>>I use a deadlift suit that works the same way.
>
> A 'deadlift suit' or erector shirt is more like wearing a
> bench shirt backwards.
>
> >>Wow. Thanks. This is for competition only, right? I mean, people don't
> >>use this for training, do they? Throw on the shirt and do four sets?
> >
> > You had better train with it more than just a couple of times if you
> > plan to compete with it. I learned that the hard way.
> >
> > That said, you had also better have some pals who are willing to
> > squeeze you into it each time. I've heard the Titan shirts, with some
> > effort, can be put on by yourself. An Inzer absolutely requires
> > another person to help you, and if it's particularly tight, it will
> > take two others.
>
> Depends on how tight the shirt is.
>
> Inzer has the stretchy back option on the phenom similar to
> the Titan Fury. Crain now has this option too. Makes them
> easier to get on and off.

Don't know about the Crain, but a Phenom tight enough to be of any use
whatsoever still takes a helper to get on, even with the stretch back.
Much harder to get into than an equivalent Fury.

bc
July 23rd 04, 06:35 PM
"Kromagnon" > wrote in message >...
> Jon C wrote:
> > Kromagnon wrote:
> >
> >> User wrote:
> >>
> >>> I keep hearing everyone talk about bench press shirts.
> >>>
> >>> Whatsit? What do they do?
> >>
> >>
> >> They are very tight and don't stretch. Very difficult to
> put
> >> on. They keep the upper body very tight so you can lift
> more.
> >> I use a deadlift suit that works the same way.
> >>
> >> http://www.inzernet.com/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=05_PHENOM
> >>
> >>
> >> K
> >
> > Wow, weird. Do those really work?
>
> Yes, they work very well. The double thickness shirts and
> suits work so well that many lifting organizations don't allow
> them.
>
>
> K

I'll take some heat for this, but I think they're crap. I might as
well drive in on a frontloader and see if I can lift more than the
next guy.

- bc

Jeff Finlayson
July 23rd 04, 06:48 PM
Will wrote:
>Jeff Finlayson wrote:
>>John M. Williams wrote:

>>>That said, you had also better have some pals who are willing to
>>>squeeze you into it each time. I've heard the Titan shirts, with some
>>>effort, can be put on by yourself. An Inzer absolutely requires
>>>another person to help you, and if it's particularly tight, it will
>>>take two others.
>>
>>Depends on how tight the shirt is.
>>
>>Inzer has the stretchy back option on the phenom similar to
>>the Titan Fury. Crain now has this option too. Makes them
>>easier to get on and off.
>
> Don't know about the Crain, but a Phenom tight enough to be of any use
> whatsoever still takes a helper to get on, even with the stretch back.
> Much harder to get into than an equivalent Fury.

I meant easier to get on/off than the comparable firm back shirts.

Kromagnon
July 23rd 04, 07:19 PM
bc wrote:
> "Kromagnon" > wrote in message
> >...
>> Jon C wrote:
>>> Kromagnon wrote:
>>>
>>>> User wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> I keep hearing everyone talk about bench press shirts.
>>>>>
>>>>> Whatsit? What do they do?
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> They are very tight and don't stretch. Very difficult to
>> put
>>>> on. They keep the upper body very tight so you can lift
>> more.
>>>> I use a deadlift suit that works the same way.
>>>>
>>>> http://www.inzernet.com/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=05_PHENOM
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> K
>>>
>>> Wow, weird. Do those really work?
>>
>> Yes, they work very well. The double thickness shirts and
>> suits work so well that many lifting organizations don't
allow
>> them.
>>
>>
>> K
>
> I'll take some heat for this, but I think they're crap. I
might as
> well drive in on a frontloader and see if I can lift more
than the
> next guy.

Well, there are "raw" meets where no equipment is allowed. In
competition, if the lifting organization (meet) allows the
equipment and you don't choose to use it, you are at a
distinct disadvantage.

K
>
> - bc

Keith Hobman
July 23rd 04, 08:14 PM
In article >,
(bc) wrote:

> "Kromagnon" > wrote in message
>...
> > Jon C wrote:
> > > Kromagnon wrote:
> > >
> > >> User wrote:
> > >>
> > >>> I keep hearing everyone talk about bench press shirts.
> > >>>
> > >>> Whatsit? What do they do?
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> They are very tight and don't stretch. Very difficult to
> > put
> > >> on. They keep the upper body very tight so you can lift
> > more.
> > >> I use a deadlift suit that works the same way.
> > >>
> > >> http://www.inzernet.com/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=05_PHENOM
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> K
> > >
> > > Wow, weird. Do those really work?
> >
> > Yes, they work very well. The double thickness shirts and
> > suits work so well that many lifting organizations don't allow
> > them.
> >
> >
> > K
>
> I'll take some heat for this, but I think they're crap. I might as
> well drive in on a frontloader and see if I can lift more than the
> next guy.


I wish they didn't exist.

But a guy just did 925 lbs with one. Imagine someone placing a 925 lb bar
onto your hands while you are lying on a bench.

I wouldn't belittle the accomplishments of those who use them. It is _not_
like using a front-end loader. Having said that, they add up to several
hundred lbs to the bench of some people. Why? I'm more impressed by James
Henderson's 725 lb bench without a shirt than Rybeks (spelling is wrong,
but it goes to show how little I care about the state of bench pressing
nowadays!) 925. But...

925 lbs at the end of your arms. Sheesh.

--
Dawn's cold kiss calls me
Forth I creep, blindly stumbling
Joy: Morning workouts.
Hugh Beyer's 'Haiku On Returning To Weights'

TX_Dude
July 23rd 04, 08:45 PM
**** Post for FREE via your newsreader at post.usenet.com ****


"Keith Hobman" > wrote in message
...
> In article >, Jeff Finlayson
> > wrote:
>
> > TX_Dude wrote:
> > > "DanL" wrote:
> > >
> > >>Pretty much for competition. But you need to practice with it, you
don't
> > >>just want to use it only at a meet. Most people who use one will start
> > >>wearing it several weeks out from the contest. I wouldn't do 4 sets of
10
> > >>with it but I do multiple singles and doubles in my workouts with it
on.
> > >
> > > What is the best shirt for someone who is 6-2 250 lbs
> > > and benches just below the nipple?
> >
> > Probably a crain shirt. Titan fury will touch lower and Inzer
> > shirts seem to touch higher (closer to collarbone).
> >
> > > Bench is currently around 425 RAW
> > > I've have NO idea what shirt to buy.
> > >
> > > I'm thinking of competing in the WABDL and APA.
>
> If you are competing in those organizations the best shirt is probably the
> Metal Pro shirt.
>
> Dave Tate now carries them.
>
> http://www.elitefts.com/
>
> Basically you build your own shirt with Metal. I'd suggest double poly for
> a starter, but you may want to go more radical.

From the WABDL.org website:

The METAL bench shirt is not approved because a request to inspect a shirt
was ignored and phone calls were not returned.



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Will
July 23rd 04, 09:54 PM
In article >,
(Keith Hobman) wrote:

> In article >,
> (bc) wrote:
>
> > "Kromagnon" > wrote in message
> >...
> > > Jon C wrote:
> > > > Kromagnon wrote:
> > > >
> > > >> User wrote:
> > > >>
> > > >>> I keep hearing everyone talk about bench press shirts.
> > > >>>
> > > >>> Whatsit? What do they do?
> > > >>
> > > >>
> > > >> They are very tight and don't stretch. Very difficult to
> > > put
> > > >> on. They keep the upper body very tight so you can lift
> > > more.
> > > >> I use a deadlift suit that works the same way.
> > > >>
> > > >> http://www.inzernet.com/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=05_PHENOM
> > > >>
> > > >>
> > > >> K
> > > >
> > > > Wow, weird. Do those really work?
> > >
> > > Yes, they work very well. The double thickness shirts and
> > > suits work so well that many lifting organizations don't allow
> > > them.
> > >
> > >
> > > K
> >
> > I'll take some heat for this, but I think they're crap. I might as
> > well drive in on a frontloader and see if I can lift more than the
> > next guy.
>
>
> I wish they didn't exist.
>
> But a guy just did 925 lbs with one. Imagine someone placing a 925 lb bar
> onto your hands while you are lying on a bench.
>
> I wouldn't belittle the accomplishments of those who use them. It is _not_
> like using a front-end loader. Having said that, they add up to several
> hundred lbs to the bench of some people. Why? I'm more impressed by James
> Henderson's 725 lb bench without a shirt than Rybeks (spelling is wrong,
> but it goes to show how little I care about the state of bench pressing
> nowadays!) 925. But...
>
> 925 lbs at the end of your arms. Sheesh.

Actually he's now at an "official" (passed but ugly) 965.

I know Henderson didn't use a shirt, but did he wrap his elbows? I'm
not saying it compares to a modern shirt, but a lot of the big lifts of
old weren't really "raw" either.

Chupacabra
July 23rd 04, 10:04 PM
On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 13:54:36 -0700, Will >
wrote:

>In article >,
> (Keith Hobman) wrote:
>
>> In article >,
>> (bc) wrote:
>>
>> > "Kromagnon" > wrote in message
>> >...
>> > > Jon C wrote:
>> > > > Kromagnon wrote:
>> > > >
>> > > >> User wrote:
>> > > >>
>> > > >>> I keep hearing everyone talk about bench press shirts.
>> > > >>>
>> > > >>> Whatsit? What do they do?
>> > > >>
>> > > >>
>> > > >> They are very tight and don't stretch. Very difficult to
>> > > put
>> > > >> on. They keep the upper body very tight so you can lift
>> > > more.
>> > > >> I use a deadlift suit that works the same way.
>> > > >>
>> > > >> http://www.inzernet.com/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=05_PHENOM
>> > > >>
>> > > >>
>> > > >> K
>> > > >
>> > > > Wow, weird. Do those really work?
>> > >
>> > > Yes, they work very well. The double thickness shirts and
>> > > suits work so well that many lifting organizations don't allow
>> > > them.
>> > >
>> > >
>> > > K
>> >
>> > I'll take some heat for this, but I think they're crap. I might as
>> > well drive in on a frontloader and see if I can lift more than the
>> > next guy.
>>
>>
>> I wish they didn't exist.
>>
>> But a guy just did 925 lbs with one. Imagine someone placing a 925 lb bar
>> onto your hands while you are lying on a bench.
>>
>> I wouldn't belittle the accomplishments of those who use them. It is _not_
>> like using a front-end loader. Having said that, they add up to several
>> hundred lbs to the bench of some people. Why? I'm more impressed by James
>> Henderson's 725 lb bench without a shirt than Rybeks (spelling is wrong,
>> but it goes to show how little I care about the state of bench pressing
>> nowadays!) 925. But...
>>
>> 925 lbs at the end of your arms. Sheesh.
>
>Actually he's now at an "official" (passed but ugly) 965.

Have you seen the video? Obviously I wasn't there, didn't actually see
the lift, wasn't the judge, etc., but to me it sure as hell looked
like that bar moved downward during the lift.

Still freakin' impressive though.

>
>I know Henderson didn't use a shirt, but did he wrap his elbows? I'm
>not saying it compares to a modern shirt, but a lot of the big lifts of
>old weren't really "raw" either.

Keith Hobman
July 23rd 04, 10:09 PM
In article >, Will
> wrote:

> In article >,
> (Keith Hobman) wrote:
>
> > In article >,
> > (bc) wrote:
> >
> > > "Kromagnon" > wrote in message
> > >...
> > > > Jon C wrote:
> > > > > Kromagnon wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > >> User wrote:
> > > > >>
> > > > >>> I keep hearing everyone talk about bench press shirts.
> > > > >>>
> > > > >>> Whatsit? What do they do?
> > > > >>
> > > > >>
> > > > >> They are very tight and don't stretch. Very difficult to
> > > > put
> > > > >> on. They keep the upper body very tight so you can lift
> > > > more.
> > > > >> I use a deadlift suit that works the same way.
> > > > >>
> > > > >> http://www.inzernet.com/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=05_PHENOM
> > > > >>
> > > > >>
> > > > >> K
> > > > >
> > > > > Wow, weird. Do those really work?
> > > >
> > > > Yes, they work very well. The double thickness shirts and
> > > > suits work so well that many lifting organizations don't allow
> > > > them.
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > K
> > >
> > > I'll take some heat for this, but I think they're crap. I might as
> > > well drive in on a frontloader and see if I can lift more than the
> > > next guy.
> >
> >
> > I wish they didn't exist.
> >
> > But a guy just did 925 lbs with one. Imagine someone placing a 925 lb bar
> > onto your hands while you are lying on a bench.
> >
> > I wouldn't belittle the accomplishments of those who use them. It is _not_
> > like using a front-end loader. Having said that, they add up to several
> > hundred lbs to the bench of some people. Why? I'm more impressed by James
> > Henderson's 725 lb bench without a shirt than Rybeks (spelling is wrong,
> > but it goes to show how little I care about the state of bench pressing
> > nowadays!) 925. But...
> >
> > 925 lbs at the end of your arms. Sheesh.
>
> Actually he's now at an "official" (passed but ugly) 965.
>
> I know Henderson didn't use a shirt, but did he wrap his elbows? I'm
> not saying it compares to a modern shirt, but a lot of the big lifts of
> old weren't really "raw" either.

Henderson did it at the IPF Worlds in Edmonton, Alta back when I started
to lift - 1999 or something like that. No shirt, no wraps, no drugs (or
passed the test anyhow, but I believe he didn't use - guy was just
freakin' big). It was really 'raw'. He also just asked for a back spot -
nobody on the sides. Confident dude.

--
Dawn's cold kiss calls me
Forth I creep, blindly stumbling
Joy: Morning workouts.
Hugh Beyer's 'Haiku On Returning To Weights'