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John Hanson
July 14th 03, 08:55 PM
....that being obese is perfectly acceptable lifestyle choice. Just
found out a guy I know pretty well (he's a customer of mine) died last
week at the age of 47. He was at least 400 lbs. and the quality of
his life was very poor IMO. His closest friend was his German
Shepherd and he had no family except a brother.

Anyway, he wasn't looking too good at work last Thursday so they
called the paramedics. They put him on a stretcher and subsequently
dropped him because of his weight. He then died shortly afterwards
with a massive coronary.

Keith Hobman
July 14th 03, 09:06 PM
In article >, John Hanson
> wrote:

> ...that being obese is perfectly acceptable lifestyle choice. Just
> found out a guy I know pretty well (he's a customer of mine) died last
> week at the age of 47. He was at least 400 lbs. and the quality of
> his life was very poor IMO. His closest friend was his German
> Shepherd and he had no family except a brother.
>
> Anyway, he wasn't looking too good at work last Thursday so they
> called the paramedics. They put him on a stretcher and subsequently
> dropped him because of his weight. He then died shortly afterwards
> with a massive coronary.

Not that I think being obese is a good choice, but thin people also die
lonely and relatively young.

I think the issue to focus on is health and wellness. We tend to focus too
much on appearance.

--
Keith Hobman

--- email address above is a non-monitored spam sink.

Keith Hobman
July 14th 03, 09:06 PM
In article >, John Hanson
> wrote:

> ...that being obese is perfectly acceptable lifestyle choice. Just
> found out a guy I know pretty well (he's a customer of mine) died last
> week at the age of 47. He was at least 400 lbs. and the quality of
> his life was very poor IMO. His closest friend was his German
> Shepherd and he had no family except a brother.
>
> Anyway, he wasn't looking too good at work last Thursday so they
> called the paramedics. They put him on a stretcher and subsequently
> dropped him because of his weight. He then died shortly afterwards
> with a massive coronary.

Not that I think being obese is a good choice, but thin people also die
lonely and relatively young.

I think the issue to focus on is health and wellness. We tend to focus too
much on appearance.

--
Keith Hobman

--- email address above is a non-monitored spam sink.

John Hanson
July 14th 03, 10:02 PM
On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 14:06:03 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

>In article >, John Hanson
> wrote:
>
>> ...that being obese is perfectly acceptable lifestyle choice. Just
>> found out a guy I know pretty well (he's a customer of mine) died last
>> week at the age of 47. He was at least 400 lbs. and the quality of
>> his life was very poor IMO. His closest friend was his German
>> Shepherd and he had no family except a brother.
>>
>> Anyway, he wasn't looking too good at work last Thursday so they
>> called the paramedics. They put him on a stretcher and subsequently
>> dropped him because of his weight. He then died shortly afterwards
>> with a massive coronary.
>
>Not that I think being obese is a good choice, but thin people also die
>lonely and relatively young.
>
>I think the issue to focus on is health and wellness. We tend to focus too
>much on appearance.

I was referring to his health. The guy could hardly walk across the
street he was in such bad health. His only hobby was sitting at the
computer at home.

John Hanson
July 14th 03, 10:02 PM
On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 14:06:03 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

>In article >, John Hanson
> wrote:
>
>> ...that being obese is perfectly acceptable lifestyle choice. Just
>> found out a guy I know pretty well (he's a customer of mine) died last
>> week at the age of 47. He was at least 400 lbs. and the quality of
>> his life was very poor IMO. His closest friend was his German
>> Shepherd and he had no family except a brother.
>>
>> Anyway, he wasn't looking too good at work last Thursday so they
>> called the paramedics. They put him on a stretcher and subsequently
>> dropped him because of his weight. He then died shortly afterwards
>> with a massive coronary.
>
>Not that I think being obese is a good choice, but thin people also die
>lonely and relatively young.
>
>I think the issue to focus on is health and wellness. We tend to focus too
>much on appearance.

I was referring to his health. The guy could hardly walk across the
street he was in such bad health. His only hobby was sitting at the
computer at home.

Brad
July 15th 03, 01:08 AM
"John Hanson" > wrote in message
...
> ...that being obese is perfectly acceptable lifestyle choice. Just
> found out a guy I know pretty well (he's a customer of mine) died last
> week at the age of 47. He was at least 400 lbs. and the quality of
> his life was very poor IMO. His closest friend was his German
> Shepherd and he had no family except a brother.
>
> Anyway, he wasn't looking too good at work last Thursday so they
> called the paramedics. They put him on a stretcher and subsequently
> dropped him because of his weight. He then died shortly afterwards
> with a massive coronary.
>
>

Sad story. It really is. And it's important to remember that not all
overweight/obese people are that way because they're just lazy or gluttons.
Many can't help the way they are. Many have psychological issues, others
have physical problems, and usually most have both to deal with. When I was
younger, I used to ignorantly discriminate and poke fun at fat people. Then
I became obese myself. Now I'm back to normal, but have found fat people to
be some of the nicest, loving, caring and friendly folk you could ever come
across. Prejudice against them is disgusting, pure evil.

Brad
July 15th 03, 01:08 AM
"John Hanson" > wrote in message
...
> ...that being obese is perfectly acceptable lifestyle choice. Just
> found out a guy I know pretty well (he's a customer of mine) died last
> week at the age of 47. He was at least 400 lbs. and the quality of
> his life was very poor IMO. His closest friend was his German
> Shepherd and he had no family except a brother.
>
> Anyway, he wasn't looking too good at work last Thursday so they
> called the paramedics. They put him on a stretcher and subsequently
> dropped him because of his weight. He then died shortly afterwards
> with a massive coronary.
>
>

Sad story. It really is. And it's important to remember that not all
overweight/obese people are that way because they're just lazy or gluttons.
Many can't help the way they are. Many have psychological issues, others
have physical problems, and usually most have both to deal with. When I was
younger, I used to ignorantly discriminate and poke fun at fat people. Then
I became obese myself. Now I'm back to normal, but have found fat people to
be some of the nicest, loving, caring and friendly folk you could ever come
across. Prejudice against them is disgusting, pure evil.

Ben Hanson
July 16th 03, 02:34 AM
Ahh, yes. The overweight IT type. It is sad when I go to big computer
conventions or training events. You have never seen so many doughnuts,
Mountain Dew, and Star Trek T-shirts in all your life.

I was out in Anaheim at a huge Microsoft training conference last year, and
outside the classrooms where we were teaching, they had giant tables and
coolers set up with free drinks and snacks. On the very top floor there was
a single table with healthy stuff like fresh fruit and trail mix packs. On
every other table, on every other floor (this is the Anaheim Convention
center, a huge place), the tables were stacked with boxes of Krispy Kreme's,
coolers full of Dew, and the like. It was a hit to say the least. There was
one guy in the mornings at breakfast who was so huge he was in a motorized
wheelchair. I walked by his table, and he had a BOX of Krispy Kreme's, a
Dew, and a bowl of Frosted Flakes on his tray. I kid you not. So, I say all
that to say, that I could have picked up any girl in the place (though I
would not want to, because they were all female versions of the men), just
because I was the only one who was in good shape and not wearing Spock ears.
OK, that is a bit much, but you get the point. IT people. Gotta love em!

-Ben

"John Hanson" > wrote in message
...
> On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 14:06:03 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>
> >In article >, John Hanson
> > wrote:
> >
> >> ...that being obese is perfectly acceptable lifestyle choice. Just
> >> found out a guy I know pretty well (he's a customer of mine) died last
> >> week at the age of 47. He was at least 400 lbs. and the quality of
> >> his life was very poor IMO. His closest friend was his German
> >> Shepherd and he had no family except a brother.
> >>
> >> Anyway, he wasn't looking too good at work last Thursday so they
> >> called the paramedics. They put him on a stretcher and subsequently
> >> dropped him because of his weight. He then died shortly afterwards
> >> with a massive coronary.
> >
> >Not that I think being obese is a good choice, but thin people also die
> >lonely and relatively young.
> >
> >I think the issue to focus on is health and wellness. We tend to focus
too
> >much on appearance.
>
> I was referring to his health. The guy could hardly walk across the
> street he was in such bad health. His only hobby was sitting at the
> computer at home.
>

Ben Hanson
July 16th 03, 02:34 AM
Ahh, yes. The overweight IT type. It is sad when I go to big computer
conventions or training events. You have never seen so many doughnuts,
Mountain Dew, and Star Trek T-shirts in all your life.

I was out in Anaheim at a huge Microsoft training conference last year, and
outside the classrooms where we were teaching, they had giant tables and
coolers set up with free drinks and snacks. On the very top floor there was
a single table with healthy stuff like fresh fruit and trail mix packs. On
every other table, on every other floor (this is the Anaheim Convention
center, a huge place), the tables were stacked with boxes of Krispy Kreme's,
coolers full of Dew, and the like. It was a hit to say the least. There was
one guy in the mornings at breakfast who was so huge he was in a motorized
wheelchair. I walked by his table, and he had a BOX of Krispy Kreme's, a
Dew, and a bowl of Frosted Flakes on his tray. I kid you not. So, I say all
that to say, that I could have picked up any girl in the place (though I
would not want to, because they were all female versions of the men), just
because I was the only one who was in good shape and not wearing Spock ears.
OK, that is a bit much, but you get the point. IT people. Gotta love em!

-Ben

"John Hanson" > wrote in message
...
> On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 14:06:03 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>
> >In article >, John Hanson
> > wrote:
> >
> >> ...that being obese is perfectly acceptable lifestyle choice. Just
> >> found out a guy I know pretty well (he's a customer of mine) died last
> >> week at the age of 47. He was at least 400 lbs. and the quality of
> >> his life was very poor IMO. His closest friend was his German
> >> Shepherd and he had no family except a brother.
> >>
> >> Anyway, he wasn't looking too good at work last Thursday so they
> >> called the paramedics. They put him on a stretcher and subsequently
> >> dropped him because of his weight. He then died shortly afterwards
> >> with a massive coronary.
> >
> >Not that I think being obese is a good choice, but thin people also die
> >lonely and relatively young.
> >
> >I think the issue to focus on is health and wellness. We tend to focus
too
> >much on appearance.
>
> I was referring to his health. The guy could hardly walk across the
> street he was in such bad health. His only hobby was sitting at the
> computer at home.
>

Lady Veteran
July 16th 03, 03:56 AM
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On Tue, 15 Jul 2003 21:34:17 -0400, "Ben Hanson"
> wrote:

>Ahh, yes. The overweight IT type. It is sad when I go to big
>computer conventions or training events. You have never seen so many
>doughnuts, Mountain Dew, and Star Trek T-shirts in all your life.
>

What you describe is standard programmer fare. Not all are fat
either. Just like in any other segment of the population-there are
thin and there fat.

Big deal. Don't make things out to be something they are not.

LV

Lady Veteran
- -----------------------------------
"I rode a tank and held a general's rank
when the blitzkrieg raged and the bodies stank..."
- -Rolling Stones, Sympathy for the Devil
- ------------------------------------------------
Support bacteria - they're the only culture
some people have." -Stephen Wright
- -------------------------------------------


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Lady Veteran
July 16th 03, 03:56 AM
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On Tue, 15 Jul 2003 21:34:17 -0400, "Ben Hanson"
> wrote:

>Ahh, yes. The overweight IT type. It is sad when I go to big
>computer conventions or training events. You have never seen so many
>doughnuts, Mountain Dew, and Star Trek T-shirts in all your life.
>

What you describe is standard programmer fare. Not all are fat
either. Just like in any other segment of the population-there are
thin and there fat.

Big deal. Don't make things out to be something they are not.

LV

Lady Veteran
- -----------------------------------
"I rode a tank and held a general's rank
when the blitzkrieg raged and the bodies stank..."
- -Rolling Stones, Sympathy for the Devil
- ------------------------------------------------
Support bacteria - they're the only culture
some people have." -Stephen Wright
- -------------------------------------------


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JC Der Koenig
July 16th 03, 04:01 AM
"Lady Veteran" > wrote in message
...
> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
> Hash: SHA1
>
> On Tue, 15 Jul 2003 21:34:17 -0400, "Ben Hanson"
> > wrote:
>
> >Ahh, yes. The overweight IT type. It is sad when I go to big
> >computer conventions or training events. You have never seen so many
> >doughnuts, Mountain Dew, and Star Trek T-shirts in all your life.
> >
>
> What you describe is standard programmer fare. Not all are fat
> either. Just like in any other segment of the population-there are
> thin and there fat.
>
> Big deal. Don't make things out to be something they are not.
>
> LV
>

If you're so fat you have to sit in a wheelchair, but yet you have a box of
doughnuts in your lap, it is a big deal. Way too big.

JC Der Koenig
July 16th 03, 04:01 AM
"Lady Veteran" > wrote in message
...
> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
> Hash: SHA1
>
> On Tue, 15 Jul 2003 21:34:17 -0400, "Ben Hanson"
> > wrote:
>
> >Ahh, yes. The overweight IT type. It is sad when I go to big
> >computer conventions or training events. You have never seen so many
> >doughnuts, Mountain Dew, and Star Trek T-shirts in all your life.
> >
>
> What you describe is standard programmer fare. Not all are fat
> either. Just like in any other segment of the population-there are
> thin and there fat.
>
> Big deal. Don't make things out to be something they are not.
>
> LV
>

If you're so fat you have to sit in a wheelchair, but yet you have a box of
doughnuts in your lap, it is a big deal. Way too big.

Lordy
July 16th 03, 09:51 AM
On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 03:01:37 +0000, JC Der Koenig wrote:

>
> "Lady Veteran" > wrote in message
> ...
>> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
>> Hash: SHA1
>>
>> On Tue, 15 Jul 2003 21:34:17 -0400, "Ben Hanson"
>> > wrote:
>>
>> >Ahh, yes. The overweight IT type. It is sad when I go to big computer
>> >conventions or training events. You have never seen so many doughnuts,
>> >Mountain Dew, and Star Trek T-shirts in all your life.
>> >
>> >
>> What you describe is standard programmer fare. Not all are fat either.
>> Just like in any other segment of the population-there are thin and
>> there fat.
>>
>> Big deal. Don't make things out to be something they are not.
>>
>> LV
>>
>>
> If you're so fat you have to sit in a wheelchair, but yet you have a box
> of doughnuts in your lap, it is a big deal. Way too big.

Too many assumptions, too little information.

Lordy

Lordy
July 16th 03, 09:51 AM
On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 03:01:37 +0000, JC Der Koenig wrote:

>
> "Lady Veteran" > wrote in message
> ...
>> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
>> Hash: SHA1
>>
>> On Tue, 15 Jul 2003 21:34:17 -0400, "Ben Hanson"
>> > wrote:
>>
>> >Ahh, yes. The overweight IT type. It is sad when I go to big computer
>> >conventions or training events. You have never seen so many doughnuts,
>> >Mountain Dew, and Star Trek T-shirts in all your life.
>> >
>> >
>> What you describe is standard programmer fare. Not all are fat either.
>> Just like in any other segment of the population-there are thin and
>> there fat.
>>
>> Big deal. Don't make things out to be something they are not.
>>
>> LV
>>
>>
> If you're so fat you have to sit in a wheelchair, but yet you have a box
> of doughnuts in your lap, it is a big deal. Way too big.

Too many assumptions, too little information.

Lordy

Pierre Honeyman
July 16th 03, 05:41 PM
Lady Veteran > wrote in message >...
> On Tue, 15 Jul 2003 21:34:17 -0400, "Ben Hanson"
> > wrote:
>
> >Ahh, yes. The overweight IT type. It is sad when I go to big
> >computer conventions or training events. You have never seen so many
> >doughnuts, Mountain Dew, and Star Trek T-shirts in all your life.
> >
> What you describe is standard programmer fare. Not all are fat
> either. Just like in any other segment of the population-there are
> thin and there fat.

The fat ones are the ones that eat the way Ben described.

The world of programming has changed; some of us are even in shape these days.

Pierre

Pierre Honeyman
July 16th 03, 05:41 PM
Lady Veteran > wrote in message >...
> On Tue, 15 Jul 2003 21:34:17 -0400, "Ben Hanson"
> > wrote:
>
> >Ahh, yes. The overweight IT type. It is sad when I go to big
> >computer conventions or training events. You have never seen so many
> >doughnuts, Mountain Dew, and Star Trek T-shirts in all your life.
> >
> What you describe is standard programmer fare. Not all are fat
> either. Just like in any other segment of the population-there are
> thin and there fat.

The fat ones are the ones that eat the way Ben described.

The world of programming has changed; some of us are even in shape these days.

Pierre

Pierre Honeyman
July 16th 03, 07:50 PM
Lordy > wrote in message >...
> On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 06:41:26 -0400, Ben Hanson wrote:
>
> > Is it possible that he was in a wheel chair for other reasons than because
> > he was too large to walk? Of course.
>
> Yes. The initial post assumed he was so fat he ended up in a wheelchair.
> Thats possible. Also another assumption is that he cant walk for other reasons,
> ended up in a wheelchair and clearly hasnt adjusted his calorie intake for
> his more sedentary lifestyle! (or even an active one!)

I don't know what kind of activity level you have to have to be able
to handle a box of Krispy Kremes for breakfast.

Pierre

Pierre Honeyman
July 16th 03, 07:50 PM
Lordy > wrote in message >...
> On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 06:41:26 -0400, Ben Hanson wrote:
>
> > Is it possible that he was in a wheel chair for other reasons than because
> > he was too large to walk? Of course.
>
> Yes. The initial post assumed he was so fat he ended up in a wheelchair.
> Thats possible. Also another assumption is that he cant walk for other reasons,
> ended up in a wheelchair and clearly hasnt adjusted his calorie intake for
> his more sedentary lifestyle! (or even an active one!)

I don't know what kind of activity level you have to have to be able
to handle a box of Krispy Kremes for breakfast.

Pierre

J. Thiessen
July 16th 03, 08:43 PM
Pierre Honeyman wrote:
> Lordy > wrote in message >...
>> On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 06:41:26 -0400, Ben Hanson wrote:
>>
>> > Is it possible that he was in a wheel chair for other reasons than because
>> > he was too large to walk? Of course.
>>
>> Yes. The initial post assumed he was so fat he ended up in a wheelchair.
>> Thats possible. Also another assumption is that he cant walk for other reasons,
>> ended up in a wheelchair and clearly hasnt adjusted his calorie intake for
>> his more sedentary lifestyle! (or even an active one!)
>
> I don't know what kind of activity level you have to have to be able
> to handle a box of Krispy Kremes for breakfast.

Immediate HIT ab work ought to do the trick...

Double the pleasure, a fraction of the absorbed calories.

Win-win, I say.

J.

J. Thiessen
July 16th 03, 08:43 PM
Pierre Honeyman wrote:
> Lordy > wrote in message >...
>> On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 06:41:26 -0400, Ben Hanson wrote:
>>
>> > Is it possible that he was in a wheel chair for other reasons than because
>> > he was too large to walk? Of course.
>>
>> Yes. The initial post assumed he was so fat he ended up in a wheelchair.
>> Thats possible. Also another assumption is that he cant walk for other reasons,
>> ended up in a wheelchair and clearly hasnt adjusted his calorie intake for
>> his more sedentary lifestyle! (or even an active one!)
>
> I don't know what kind of activity level you have to have to be able
> to handle a box of Krispy Kremes for breakfast.

Immediate HIT ab work ought to do the trick...

Double the pleasure, a fraction of the absorbed calories.

Win-win, I say.

J.

Ben Hanson
July 17th 03, 12:53 AM
Perhaps. That wasn't my point. My point was that you sounded a bit
condescending when I implied that he was in a wheelchair because of his
eating habits, when, given the situation and all the details available at
the time, it is perfectly logical that someone would come to the same
conclusion, and that does not imply any malice on my part. Maybe in your
efforts to defend overweight people you assume people are being malicious,
when they are not.

-Ben

"Lordy" > wrote in message
o.uk...
> On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 06:41:26 -0400, Ben Hanson wrote:
>
> > Is it possible that he was in a wheel chair for other reasons than
because
> > he was too large to walk? Of course.
>
> Yes. The initial post assumed he was so fat he ended up in a wheelchair.
> Thats possible. Also another assumption is that he cant walk for other
reasons,
> ended up in a wheelchair and clearly hasnt adjusted his calorie intake for
> his more sedentary lifestyle! (or even an active one!)
>
> Lordy
>

Ben Hanson
July 17th 03, 12:53 AM
Perhaps. That wasn't my point. My point was that you sounded a bit
condescending when I implied that he was in a wheelchair because of his
eating habits, when, given the situation and all the details available at
the time, it is perfectly logical that someone would come to the same
conclusion, and that does not imply any malice on my part. Maybe in your
efforts to defend overweight people you assume people are being malicious,
when they are not.

-Ben

"Lordy" > wrote in message
o.uk...
> On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 06:41:26 -0400, Ben Hanson wrote:
>
> > Is it possible that he was in a wheel chair for other reasons than
because
> > he was too large to walk? Of course.
>
> Yes. The initial post assumed he was so fat he ended up in a wheelchair.
> Thats possible. Also another assumption is that he cant walk for other
reasons,
> ended up in a wheelchair and clearly hasnt adjusted his calorie intake for
> his more sedentary lifestyle! (or even an active one!)
>
> Lordy
>

Lady Veteran
July 17th 03, 01:25 AM
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On 16 Jul 2003 09:41:43 -0700, (Pierre Honeyman)
wrote:

>Lady Veteran > wrote in message
>...
>> On Tue, 15 Jul 2003 21:34:17 -0400, "Ben Hanson"
>> > wrote:
>>
>> >Ahh, yes. The overweight IT type. It is sad when I go to big
>> >computer conventions or training events. You have never seen so
>> >many doughnuts, Mountain Dew, and Star Trek T-shirts in all your
>> >life.
>> >
>> What you describe is standard programmer fare. Not all are fat
>> either. Just like in any other segment of the population-there
>> are thin and there fat.
>
>The fat ones are the ones that eat the way Ben described.
>
>The world of programming has changed; some of us are even in shape
>these days.
>
>Pierre

True-some of you are. Some of you hang hard to the old ways.

There is nothing wrong with trail mix or kirspy creme. Let people
have their preferences without making a bunch of assumptions.

LV

Lady Veteran
- -----------------------------------
"I rode a tank and held a general's rank
when the blitzkrieg raged and the bodies stank..."
- -Rolling Stones, Sympathy for the Devil
- ------------------------------------------------
Support bacteria - they're the only culture
some people have." -Stephen Wright
- -------------------------------------------


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Lady Veteran
July 17th 03, 01:25 AM
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Hash: SHA1

On 16 Jul 2003 09:41:43 -0700, (Pierre Honeyman)
wrote:

>Lady Veteran > wrote in message
>...
>> On Tue, 15 Jul 2003 21:34:17 -0400, "Ben Hanson"
>> > wrote:
>>
>> >Ahh, yes. The overweight IT type. It is sad when I go to big
>> >computer conventions or training events. You have never seen so
>> >many doughnuts, Mountain Dew, and Star Trek T-shirts in all your
>> >life.
>> >
>> What you describe is standard programmer fare. Not all are fat
>> either. Just like in any other segment of the population-there
>> are thin and there fat.
>
>The fat ones are the ones that eat the way Ben described.
>
>The world of programming has changed; some of us are even in shape
>these days.
>
>Pierre

True-some of you are. Some of you hang hard to the old ways.

There is nothing wrong with trail mix or kirspy creme. Let people
have their preferences without making a bunch of assumptions.

LV

Lady Veteran
- -----------------------------------
"I rode a tank and held a general's rank
when the blitzkrieg raged and the bodies stank..."
- -Rolling Stones, Sympathy for the Devil
- ------------------------------------------------
Support bacteria - they're the only culture
some people have." -Stephen Wright
- -------------------------------------------


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Lordy
July 17th 03, 02:20 AM
On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 19:53:10 -0400, Ben Hanson wrote:

> Perhaps. That wasn't my point. My point was that you sounded a bit
> condescending when I implied that he was in a wheelchair because of his
> eating habits, when, given the situation and all the details available at
> the time, it is perfectly logical that someone would come to the same
> conclusion, and that does not imply any malice on my part. Maybe in your
> efforts to defend overweight people you assume people are being malicious,
> when they are not.
>
> -Ben

Yes I was being condescending because you can not just assume a
grossly obese person in a wheelchair (chomping on Krispy Kremes (sp) is
in that wheelchair because they eat too much.

Yes it is a possibility. Probably even a high one.

And they are likely to stay in it because of their eating habits.

It is also a possibility they became wheelchair bound prior to being
grossly obese, but still eat way too much.
(due to their current level of mobility & depression etc) this can easily
spiral out of control. I was gonna add a story about how this happened to
a good friend of mine but despite being believable it would be pure
fabrication :)

Any how It is not "logical" to come to the same conclusion and rule out
all other possibilities. That is amost the opposite of logic.
Maybe citing some percentage like Dr Spock (Star Trek not
Babies) would be logical. "Cap'n based on past studies, and taking into
account age, sex, race and demographics there is a 65% probability
that he ate himself into that wheelchair. That is without factoring in his
current breakfast menu."

I'm not defending him, you just haven't considered the possibilities and
passed judgement on how he ended up in a wheelchair - yet I'm being
condescending (to you) and you're being logical (to him)???.

Regardless of how he got in the wheelchair it seems obvious he's eating
too much and I'm not defending that.

I'm no angel and I can be prejudicial too. (as all of us). If someone
calls it, just learn from it!

See how top posting really messes up a thread. I bet the fat guy in the
wheelchair knows this :)

Lordy

Y
> "Lordy" > wrote in message
> o.uk...
>> On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 06:41:26 -0400, Ben Hanson wrote:
>>
>> > Is it possible that he was in a wheel chair for other reasons than
> because
>> > he was too large to walk? Of course.
>>
>> Yes. The initial post assumed he was so fat he ended up in a wheelchair.
>> Thats possible. Also another assumption is that he cant walk for other
> reasons,
>> ended up in a wheelchair and clearly hasnt adjusted his calorie intake
>> for his more sedentary lifestyle! (or even an active one!)
>>
>> Lordy
>>
>>

Lordy
July 17th 03, 02:20 AM
On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 19:53:10 -0400, Ben Hanson wrote:

> Perhaps. That wasn't my point. My point was that you sounded a bit
> condescending when I implied that he was in a wheelchair because of his
> eating habits, when, given the situation and all the details available at
> the time, it is perfectly logical that someone would come to the same
> conclusion, and that does not imply any malice on my part. Maybe in your
> efforts to defend overweight people you assume people are being malicious,
> when they are not.
>
> -Ben

Yes I was being condescending because you can not just assume a
grossly obese person in a wheelchair (chomping on Krispy Kremes (sp) is
in that wheelchair because they eat too much.

Yes it is a possibility. Probably even a high one.

And they are likely to stay in it because of their eating habits.

It is also a possibility they became wheelchair bound prior to being
grossly obese, but still eat way too much.
(due to their current level of mobility & depression etc) this can easily
spiral out of control. I was gonna add a story about how this happened to
a good friend of mine but despite being believable it would be pure
fabrication :)

Any how It is not "logical" to come to the same conclusion and rule out
all other possibilities. That is amost the opposite of logic.
Maybe citing some percentage like Dr Spock (Star Trek not
Babies) would be logical. "Cap'n based on past studies, and taking into
account age, sex, race and demographics there is a 65% probability
that he ate himself into that wheelchair. That is without factoring in his
current breakfast menu."

I'm not defending him, you just haven't considered the possibilities and
passed judgement on how he ended up in a wheelchair - yet I'm being
condescending (to you) and you're being logical (to him)???.

Regardless of how he got in the wheelchair it seems obvious he's eating
too much and I'm not defending that.

I'm no angel and I can be prejudicial too. (as all of us). If someone
calls it, just learn from it!

See how top posting really messes up a thread. I bet the fat guy in the
wheelchair knows this :)

Lordy

Y
> "Lordy" > wrote in message
> o.uk...
>> On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 06:41:26 -0400, Ben Hanson wrote:
>>
>> > Is it possible that he was in a wheel chair for other reasons than
> because
>> > he was too large to walk? Of course.
>>
>> Yes. The initial post assumed he was so fat he ended up in a wheelchair.
>> Thats possible. Also another assumption is that he cant walk for other
> reasons,
>> ended up in a wheelchair and clearly hasnt adjusted his calorie intake
>> for his more sedentary lifestyle! (or even an active one!)
>>
>> Lordy
>>
>>

Ben Hanson
July 17th 03, 02:51 AM
We will just have to agree to disagree then. I said in my original post that
I was not condemning him because of his eating habits, because I understood
that it was possible that he was in a wheelchair for other reasons. My
conclusion was that it was possible, but not likely, and on that point we
differ. I cannot present you with any empirical statistics to back that up.
But I will say this...people rarely change their eating habits overnight,
not to that degree. Even when people do eat doughnuts, there are very few
people that eat an entire box of 12 (I saw this with my own 2 eyes). Now you
can make the argument that he does not make a habit of eating this way, and
you can try to say that there should be no causal relationship in people's
minds where overweight man in wheelchair + eating a box of doughnuts= a
person in a wheelchair because he eats so poorly and weighs so much that he
cannot walk...you can try to say that people will not, or should not, come
to that conclusion, at least initially, and I will say to you that you are
living in a fantasy world, because that is not reality. I am not saying it
is fair for people to draw those conclusions, but that is reality. The only
time it becomes destructive is when people do not stop, as I said in my
first post, to consider other possibilities, or worse yet, act upon their
initial impressions without thinking ahead.

-Ben

"Lordy" > wrote in message
o.uk...
> On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 19:53:10 -0400, Ben Hanson wrote:
>
> > Perhaps. That wasn't my point. My point was that you sounded a bit
> > condescending when I implied that he was in a wheelchair because of his
> > eating habits, when, given the situation and all the details available
at
> > the time, it is perfectly logical that someone would come to the same
> > conclusion, and that does not imply any malice on my part. Maybe in your
> > efforts to defend overweight people you assume people are being
malicious,
> > when they are not.
> >
> > -Ben
>
> Yes I was being condescending because you can not just assume a
> grossly obese person in a wheelchair (chomping on Krispy Kremes (sp) is
> in that wheelchair because they eat too much.
>
> Yes it is a possibility. Probably even a high one.
>
> And they are likely to stay in it because of their eating habits.
>
> It is also a possibility they became wheelchair bound prior to being
> grossly obese, but still eat way too much.
> (due to their current level of mobility & depression etc) this can easily
> spiral out of control. I was gonna add a story about how this happened to
> a good friend of mine but despite being believable it would be pure
> fabrication :)
>
> Any how It is not "logical" to come to the same conclusion and rule out
> all other possibilities. That is amost the opposite of logic.
> Maybe citing some percentage like Dr Spock (Star Trek not
> Babies) would be logical. "Cap'n based on past studies, and taking into
> account age, sex, race and demographics there is a 65% probability
> that he ate himself into that wheelchair. That is without factoring in his
> current breakfast menu."
>
> I'm not defending him, you just haven't considered the possibilities and
> passed judgement on how he ended up in a wheelchair - yet I'm being
> condescending (to you) and you're being logical (to him)???.
>
> Regardless of how he got in the wheelchair it seems obvious he's eating
> too much and I'm not defending that.
>
> I'm no angel and I can be prejudicial too. (as all of us). If someone
> calls it, just learn from it!
>
> See how top posting really messes up a thread. I bet the fat guy in the
> wheelchair knows this :)
>
> Lordy
>
> Y
> > "Lordy" > wrote in message
> > o.uk...
> >> On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 06:41:26 -0400, Ben Hanson wrote:
> >>
> >> > Is it possible that he was in a wheel chair for other reasons than
> > because
> >> > he was too large to walk? Of course.
> >>
> >> Yes. The initial post assumed he was so fat he ended up in a
wheelchair.
> >> Thats possible. Also another assumption is that he cant walk for other
> > reasons,
> >> ended up in a wheelchair and clearly hasnt adjusted his calorie intake
> >> for his more sedentary lifestyle! (or even an active one!)
> >>
> >> Lordy
> >>
> >>
>

Ben Hanson
July 17th 03, 02:51 AM
We will just have to agree to disagree then. I said in my original post that
I was not condemning him because of his eating habits, because I understood
that it was possible that he was in a wheelchair for other reasons. My
conclusion was that it was possible, but not likely, and on that point we
differ. I cannot present you with any empirical statistics to back that up.
But I will say this...people rarely change their eating habits overnight,
not to that degree. Even when people do eat doughnuts, there are very few
people that eat an entire box of 12 (I saw this with my own 2 eyes). Now you
can make the argument that he does not make a habit of eating this way, and
you can try to say that there should be no causal relationship in people's
minds where overweight man in wheelchair + eating a box of doughnuts= a
person in a wheelchair because he eats so poorly and weighs so much that he
cannot walk...you can try to say that people will not, or should not, come
to that conclusion, at least initially, and I will say to you that you are
living in a fantasy world, because that is not reality. I am not saying it
is fair for people to draw those conclusions, but that is reality. The only
time it becomes destructive is when people do not stop, as I said in my
first post, to consider other possibilities, or worse yet, act upon their
initial impressions without thinking ahead.

-Ben

"Lordy" > wrote in message
o.uk...
> On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 19:53:10 -0400, Ben Hanson wrote:
>
> > Perhaps. That wasn't my point. My point was that you sounded a bit
> > condescending when I implied that he was in a wheelchair because of his
> > eating habits, when, given the situation and all the details available
at
> > the time, it is perfectly logical that someone would come to the same
> > conclusion, and that does not imply any malice on my part. Maybe in your
> > efforts to defend overweight people you assume people are being
malicious,
> > when they are not.
> >
> > -Ben
>
> Yes I was being condescending because you can not just assume a
> grossly obese person in a wheelchair (chomping on Krispy Kremes (sp) is
> in that wheelchair because they eat too much.
>
> Yes it is a possibility. Probably even a high one.
>
> And they are likely to stay in it because of their eating habits.
>
> It is also a possibility they became wheelchair bound prior to being
> grossly obese, but still eat way too much.
> (due to their current level of mobility & depression etc) this can easily
> spiral out of control. I was gonna add a story about how this happened to
> a good friend of mine but despite being believable it would be pure
> fabrication :)
>
> Any how It is not "logical" to come to the same conclusion and rule out
> all other possibilities. That is amost the opposite of logic.
> Maybe citing some percentage like Dr Spock (Star Trek not
> Babies) would be logical. "Cap'n based on past studies, and taking into
> account age, sex, race and demographics there is a 65% probability
> that he ate himself into that wheelchair. That is without factoring in his
> current breakfast menu."
>
> I'm not defending him, you just haven't considered the possibilities and
> passed judgement on how he ended up in a wheelchair - yet I'm being
> condescending (to you) and you're being logical (to him)???.
>
> Regardless of how he got in the wheelchair it seems obvious he's eating
> too much and I'm not defending that.
>
> I'm no angel and I can be prejudicial too. (as all of us). If someone
> calls it, just learn from it!
>
> See how top posting really messes up a thread. I bet the fat guy in the
> wheelchair knows this :)
>
> Lordy
>
> Y
> > "Lordy" > wrote in message
> > o.uk...
> >> On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 06:41:26 -0400, Ben Hanson wrote:
> >>
> >> > Is it possible that he was in a wheel chair for other reasons than
> > because
> >> > he was too large to walk? Of course.
> >>
> >> Yes. The initial post assumed he was so fat he ended up in a
wheelchair.
> >> Thats possible. Also another assumption is that he cant walk for other
> > reasons,
> >> ended up in a wheelchair and clearly hasnt adjusted his calorie intake
> >> for his more sedentary lifestyle! (or even an active one!)
> >>
> >> Lordy
> >>
> >>
>