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Top Sirloin
September 1st 04, 05:23 PM
Ignoramus350 wrote:

> I would love to live until the day when I can perform 100 pushups,
> which would be a year from now. (I have a certain thyroid nodule that
> makes me doubt whether that will happen, but that's OT).

WTF? Dude, don't leave us hanging; what's going on?

--
Scott Johnson / scottjohnson at kc dot rr dot com

Top Sirloin
September 1st 04, 08:29 PM
Ignoramus350 wrote:
> In article >, Top Sirloin wrote:
>
>>Ignoramus350 wrote:
>>
>>
>>>I would love to live until the day when I can perform 100 pushups,
>>>which would be a year from now. (I have a certain thyroid nodule that
>>>makes me doubt whether that will happen, but that's OT).
>>
>>WTF? Dude, don't leave us hanging; what's going on?
>>
>
>
> I had part of my thyroid removed due to a benign tumor 11 years
> ago. Now there is something else growing where there is no thyroid
> anymore. This is about all I know by now.

Keep me/us informed. Good luck and I'll be
thinking about you.


--
Scott Johnson / scottjohnson at kc dot rr dot com

Dally
September 1st 04, 08:53 PM
Ignoramus350 wrote:
> In article >, Top Sirloin wrote:
>
>>Ignoramus350 wrote:
>>
>>
>>>I would love to live until the day when I can perform 100 pushups,
>>>which would be a year from now. (I have a certain thyroid nodule that
>>>makes me doubt whether that will happen, but that's OT).
>>
>>WTF? Dude, don't leave us hanging; what's going on?
>>
>
>
> I had part of my thyroid removed due to a benign tumor 11 years
> ago. Now there is something else growing where there is no thyroid
> anymore. This is about all I know by now.

Not to be unusually callous, Igor, but this isn't anything dramatic,
n'est ce pas? I mean, you already take thyroid supplements, it doesn't
appear to be cancer from the tests you've done, and even if it is cancer
it's completely curable, right? I mean the worst case is you have neck
surgery again. I saw you posting on this in another group and it seems
like it's looming large in your head, but it's just another one of those
adventures of having a body as far as I can tell.

Dally

Dally
September 2nd 04, 03:12 AM
Ignoramus350 wrote:

> In article >, Dally wrote:
>
>>Ignoramus350 wrote:
>>
>>>In article >, Top Sirloin wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>Ignoramus350 wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>I would love to live until the day when I can perform 100 pushups,
>>>>>which would be a year from now. (I have a certain thyroid nodule that
>>>>>makes me doubt whether that will happen, but that's OT).
>>>>
>>>>WTF? Dude, don't leave us hanging; what's going on?
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>I had part of my thyroid removed due to a benign tumor 11 years
>>>ago. Now there is something else growing where there is no thyroid
>>>anymore. This is about all I know by now.
>>
>>Not to be unusually callous, Igor, but this isn't anything dramatic,
>>n'est ce pas? I mean, you already take thyroid supplements, it doesn't
>>appear to be cancer from the tests you've done, and even if it is cancer
>>it's completely curable, right?
>
>
> There is no evidence to suggest that it is not cancer. As for
> curability of thyroid cancer, it depends on what kind of cancer it
> is. That the nodule grows where thyroid is not anymore, is not a good
> sign.

You certainly sound dramatic. Didn't we ascertain a 95% cure rate,
where a guy getting regular medical care with insurance who's on top of
the situation doesn't typically fall into the 5% category?

It just seems a bit of trolling for sympathy to say, "I might not live
another year". I know you've brought this up in at least two other
newsgroups, so it seems like, in best MFW tradition, it's time to say,
"cite, please."

I don't doubt you're going to be annoyed by this. It's the part where
you're dead in a year that I don't buy. And don't bother trying to get
the last laugh on me on this one. :-)

Dally

DeWayne
September 2nd 04, 08:08 AM
"Ignoramus350" > wrote in message
...
> Lately, I have been working on increasing my max number of pushups. I
> do it the following way. Every day I perform two sets of pushups, with
> the same count. Every week, I increase the count by 1.
>
> I started that regimen with 32 pushups, however I had some departure
> into Pavel's Grease the Groove, and then returned back at around count
> == 38.
>
> Right now I perform sets of 48 pushups, so, this method must be
> working.

I have done 80 pushups but it has taken me nearly a week to recouperate. And
when I got finished man was I dog tired! To me it just wasn't worth the
agony.

>
> I would love to live until the day when I can perform 100 pushups,
> which would be a year from now. (I have a certain thyroid nodule that
> makes me doubt whether that will happen, but that's OT).
>
> I do the same with pullups, I do 3 sets per day, and increase the
> quantity in the set by 1 per month. That's too early to say aynthing
> about pullups. Right now my count is 11.
>
> i

AleX
September 2nd 04, 01:58 PM
Ignoramus350 > wrote:

> Lately, I have been working on increasing my max number of pushups. I
> do it the following way. Every day I perform two sets of pushups, with
> the same count. Every week, I increase the count by 1.

> I started that regimen with 32 pushups, however I had some departure
> into Pavel's Grease the Groove, and then returned back at around count
> == 38.

> Right now I perform sets of 48 pushups, so, this method must be
> working.

Yes, it is working. But at some point you might
feel it's hard to do the same number, let alone
increase. So, 100 might be somewhat farther then
one year.

---
Signature has been removed to save disk space.

Wayne S. Hill
September 2nd 04, 02:16 PM
AleX wrote:

> Ignoramus350 > wrote:
>
>> Right now I perform sets of 48 pushups, so, this method
>> must be working.
>
> Yes, it is working. But at some point you might
> feel it's hard to do the same number, let alone
> increase. So, 100 might be somewhat farther then
> one year.

Oh, I don't know. This is about muscular endurance. I don't
think there's a huge difference between being able to do 50 and
100.

--
-Wayne

John HUDSON
September 2nd 04, 02:25 PM
On 2 Sep 2004 13:16:17 GMT, "Wayne S. Hill" > wrote:

>AleX wrote:
>
>> Ignoramus350 > wrote:
>>
>>> Right now I perform sets of 48 pushups, so, this method
>>> must be working.
>>
>> Yes, it is working. But at some point you might
>> feel it's hard to do the same number, let alone
>> increase. So, 100 might be somewhat farther then
>> one year.
>
>Oh, I don't know. This is about muscular endurance. I don't
>think there's a huge difference between being able to do 50 and
>100.

I'm not quite sure why doing so many pushups is necessary. Like any
other exercise, once you can do a certain number then it is time to
apply the principle of overload, and increase the resistance.

Dally
September 2nd 04, 02:37 PM
Ignoramus350 wrote:

> In article >, Dally wrote:

>>I don't doubt you're going to be annoyed by this. It's the part where
>>you're dead in a year that I don't buy. And don't bother trying to get
>>the last laugh on me on this one. :-)
>
> The issue is what is the nodule.
> It could be non-thyroid related.
> It could be a benign adenoma (why would it be where thyroid is not).
>
> It could be a metastasis of the earlier tumor, which (under this
> hypothesis) was improperly classified as benign.
>
> It could be a metastasis of some other tumor.
>
> Given that my grandfather has thyroid cancer, nothing is out of the
> realm of possibility.
>
> My estimation, given what I know, is that 30-50% chance is that it is
> malignant, and if it is malignant, my cure rate would be in 80% (due
> to tumor being not in the thyroid).

Well, good luck on this adventure. It sure doesn't sound like much fun.

Dally

Helgi Briem
September 2nd 04, 03:29 PM
On 2 Sep 2004 13:16:17 GMT, "Wayne S. Hill" > wrote:

>AleX wrote:
>
>> Ignoramus350 > wrote:
>>
>>> Right now I perform sets of 48 pushups, so, this method
>>> must be working.
>>
>> Yes, it is working. But at some point you might
>> feel it's hard to do the same number, let alone
>> increase. So, 100 might be somewhat farther then
>> one year.
>
>Oh, I don't know. This is about muscular endurance. I don't
>think there's a huge difference between being able to do 50 and
>100.

There isn't. I did lots and lots of pushups when I was
a teenager and did 150 a couple of times. Once you can
do 50, 100 isn't that far off. It's more like running than
lifting. If you can run 5km, running 10km isn't that hard.

In fact, once you're past 100 or so, I think you can probably
keep going for a very long time as long as you don't go too
fast and rest a little at the top.

--
Helgi Briem hbriem AT simnet DOT is

Never worry about anything that you see on the news.
To get on the news it must be sufficiently rare
that your chances of being involved are negligible!

Helgi Briem
September 2nd 04, 04:53 PM
On 2 Sep 2004 15:16:07 GMT, Ignoramus8653
> wrote:

>Thanks for sharing. Since I do pushups regularly, I do not get dog
>tired from them, in fact, they give me a pleasant "buzzing" feeling in
>the arms,

That's called "the pump" and bodybuilders have been known
to wax poetic about it. Aahnold said it was "better than orgasm",
I believe. Whatever.

>as though they got bigger after the set. I know that they
>are not getting bigger, but, it feels like it.

Yes, they probably are. Your muscles get filled up with
blood and temporarily increase in size.

--
Helgi Briem hbriem AT simnet DOT is

Never worry about anything that you see on the news.
To get on the news it must be sufficiently rare
that your chances of being involved are negligible!

John HUDSON
September 2nd 04, 05:18 PM
On 2 Sep 2004 15:50:41 GMT, Ignoramus8653
> wrote:

>In article >, John HUDSON wrote:
>> On 2 Sep 2004 13:16:17 GMT, "Wayne S. Hill" > wrote:
>>
>>>AleX wrote:
>>>
>>>> Ignoramus350 > wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Right now I perform sets of 48 pushups, so, this method
>>>>> must be working.
>>>>
>>>> Yes, it is working. But at some point you might
>>>> feel it's hard to do the same number, let alone
>>>> increase. So, 100 might be somewhat farther then
>>>> one year.
>>>
>>>Oh, I don't know. This is about muscular endurance. I don't
>>>think there's a huge difference between being able to do 50 and
>>>100.
>>
>> I'm not quite sure why doing so many pushups is necessary. Like any
>> other exercise, once you can do a certain number then it is time to
>> apply the principle of overload, and increase the resistance.
>>
>
>Now that you made me think about it, my main reason includes vanity.
>
>Also, I am curious why some exercises are aerobic, and some are
>anaerobic. E.g, walking, or running, I can do for a long time because
>the body is able to supply enough oxygen to these muscles and remve
>lactic acid to sustain them indefinitely.
>
>Would I be able to condition to the point where my body can supply
>enough oxygen to the pushup muscles, to be able to do pushups for say
>20 miuntes? A purely theoretical question.

Without doubt in my opinion! As with any other exercise it would take
a while to work up to that level, and the motivation would be somewhat
bizarre, but it could be done.

It is obvious that vanity plays a great part in some people's reason
for doing press ups/push ups in such numbers. It's very much a macho
exercise and doing high numbers with good form is always quite
impressive in the gym.

I have to confess that I also have always done lots them - perhaps for
this reason. I have always been able to do a prodigious number and, as
with my pull ups, they used to be a kind of 'party piece'!!

However, since I have left the Armed Forces, my priorities have
altered enormously and I now won't waste time with high reps, working
as I do now to increase strength and maintain LBM.

John HUDSON
September 2nd 04, 05:20 PM
On Thu, 02 Sep 2004 15:53:38 +0000, Helgi Briem
> wrote:

>On 2 Sep 2004 15:16:07 GMT, Ignoramus8653
> wrote:
>
>>Thanks for sharing. Since I do pushups regularly, I do not get dog
>>tired from them, in fact, they give me a pleasant "buzzing" feeling in
>>the arms,
>
>That's called "the pump" and bodybuilders have been known
>to wax poetic about it. Aahnold said it was "better than orgasm",
>I believe. Whatever.
>
>>as though they got bigger after the set. I know that they
>>are not getting bigger, but, it feels like it.
>
>Yes, they probably are. Your muscles get filled up with
>blood and temporarily increase in size.

It used to be called 'flushing' and was quite a popular method of
training.

Helgi Briem
September 2nd 04, 06:00 PM
On 2 Sep 2004 15:50:41 GMT, Ignoramus8653
> wrote:

>Also, I am curious why some exercises are aerobic, and some are
>anaerobic.

Intensity.

>E.g, walking, or running, I can do for a long time because
>the body is able to supply enough oxygen to these muscles and remve
>lactic acid to sustain them indefinitely.

Yes, these are low intensity activities.

>Would I be able to condition to the point where my body can supply
>enough oxygen to the pushup muscles, to be able to do pushups for say
>20 miuntes?

Yes. There are people who can. I remember this guy
named Paddy Doyle, who specialised in setting endurance
records of this type. He could do thousands of pushups, situps
and the like.

The main training for this would be to be stronger though.
A pushup is something like a benchpress with 60% of
bodyweight or thereabouts. If you bench 3x your bodyweight,
this only amounts to 20% of 1RM, intensity that you can
continue for a long time. Bodyweight exercise records
are generally set by *very* lightweight people. I seem
to remember vaguely a pair of brothers, 8-10 years old,
from a circus family, who held lots of calisthenics records.

--
Helgi Briem hbriem AT simnet DOT is

Never worry about anything that you see on the news.
To get on the news it must be sufficiently rare
that your chances of being involved are negligible!

John Dunlop
September 2nd 04, 06:30 PM
Ignoramus350 wrote:

> Lately, I have been working on increasing my max number of pushups

[ ... ]

I wonder if you've read this

http://www.recordholders.org/en/list/ulysses.html

--
Jock

ray miller
September 2nd 04, 08:54 PM
On 1 Sep 2004 16:54:58 GMT, Ignoramus350
> wrote:

>Lately, I have been working on increasing my max number of pushups.

One of the reasons I started weight lifting was that I had never been
able to do even a single pushup, and if I was ever to lose enough
weight to be fit I'd like to be able to do just a few. So I started
lifting and sure enough after a few weeks I was able to complete the
first one! I lost interest after the first one. I'm more interested in
deadlift and bench, but occasionally I try a few. Yesterday I did 12.
It was far easier to do those 12 than the first one.

Ray
--
rmnsuk
273/187/182

Helgi Briem
September 3rd 04, 09:32 AM
On 2 Sep 2004 17:17:03 GMT, Ignoramus8653
> wrote:

>>>E.g, walking, or running, I can do for a long time because
>>>the body is able to supply enough oxygen to these muscles and remve
>>>lactic acid to sustain them indefinitely.
>>
>> Yes, these are low intensity activities.
>
>Are you sure that running is lower intensity than pushups? I do not
>think so. There is more at issue, how much blood gets to the muscles,
>etc.

No, of course pushups are higher intensity than running
(relative to max weight that can be pushed). What I'm saying
is that if you're strong enough, a pushup can be in the
aerobic intensity level.

>> The main training for this would be to be stronger though.
>> A pushup is something like a benchpress with 60% of
>> bodyweight or thereabouts. If you bench 3x your bodyweight,
>> this only amounts to 20% of 1RM, intensity that you can
>> continue for a long time. Bodyweight exercise records
>> are generally set by *very* lightweight people. I seem
>> to remember vaguely a pair of brothers, 8-10 years old,
>> from a circus family, who held lots of calisthenics records.
>>
>Thanks. Reading about these people is humbling.

I find it *far* less impressive than doing a big single lift,
actually. These endurance records could fairly easily
be surpassed if enough people were interested.

I did 400 situps once when I was 19. I could have continued
for much, much longer, but I got bored. I'm not temperamentally
suited to endurance work.

--
Helgi Briem hbriem AT simnet DOT is

Never worry about anything that you see on the news.
To get on the news it must be sufficiently rare
that your chances of being involved are negligible!

AleX
September 4th 04, 03:50 PM
Helgi Briem > wrote:

>>Oh, I don't know. This is about muscular endurance. I don't
>>think there's a huge difference between being able to do 50 and
>>100.

> There isn't. I did lots and lots of pushups when I was
> a teenager and did 150 a couple of times. Once you can
> do 50, 100 isn't that far off. It's more like running than
> lifting. If you can run 5km, running 10km isn't that hard.

Well, there's no huge difference between 50 and, say, 70,
but there's difference between 50 and 100. Say, I can do
60 now, and I could probably do 70-80, but I absolutely
cannot do 100+.

---
Signature has been removed to save disk space.

AleX
September 4th 04, 03:54 PM
John HUDSON > wrote:

>>Oh, I don't know. This is about muscular endurance. I don't
>>think there's a huge difference between being able to do 50 and
>>100.

> I'm not quite sure why doing so many pushups is necessary. Like any
> other exercise, once you can do a certain number then it is time to
> apply the principle of overload, and increase the resistance.

It's not easy to increase the resistance with pushups (except
maybe by increasing your weight).

Switching to one-armed pushups is quite a drastic increase,
and it is not exactly the same exercise.

---
Signature has been removed to save disk space.

Mike
September 8th 04, 07:55 PM
On Sat, 04 Sep 2004 11:50:50 -0400, AleX wrote:

> Helgi Briem > wrote:

> Well, there's no huge difference between 50 and, say, 70, but there's
> difference between 50 and 100. Say, I can do 60 now, and I could probably
> do 70-80, but I absolutely cannot do 100+.
>
> ---
> Signature has been removed to save disk space.

Mmm, if 50 is comping close enough to testing anerobic capacity the extra
required to finish 100 migh, by it's self, be enough of a hurdle. Lactate
tolerance may well be the name of the game.

--Mike

Mike
September 8th 04, 10:36 PM
On Wed, 08 Sep 2004 20:08:39 +0000, Ignoramus13725 wrote:

> In article >, Mike wrote:
>> On Sat, 04 Sep 2004 11:50:50 -0400, AleX wrote:
>>
>>> Helgi Briem > wrote:
>>
>>> Well, there's no huge difference between 50 and, say, 70, but there's
>>> difference between 50 and 100. Say, I can do 60 now, and I could
>>> probably do 70-80, but I absolutely cannot do 100+.
>>>
>>> Signature has been removed to save disk space.
>>
>> Mmm, if 50 is comping close enough to testing anerobic capacity the
>> extra required to finish 100 migh, by it's self, be enough of a hurdle.
>> Lactate tolerance may well be the name of the game.
>>
>>
> Can you explain a little more? It sounds interesting, but I cannot
> completely understand what you are saying.
>
> i

Well, just a thought and I'm no excercise physilogist but....

Let's assume that a set of 50 pushups is being done fairly quickly and the
result is pretty much a maximal sprint. That gives us a sprint of about
90sec. I gather that the fact that the effort is being done mostly by the
upper body would, for most people, indicate the recruitment of a larger
then average percentage of fast twitch muscle fiber. Such and excercise is
unlikely, regardless of strength, to be an aerobic one.

Soo.... I'd think training for '100 pushups' should look more like a 200
freestyler swimming up to the 400 or a 500m kayaker racing the 1000m then
a OL trying to snatch another 10kg. All these are middle distance sprints
that probably don't depend on greater MVO2, strength or endurance to make
each respective jump. Well not primarily anyway.

I'd think it likely that the fastest, no nec the best, way to jump from 50
to 100 pushups would, simply, be to apply some interval trianing
principles and just learn to hurt more.

--Mike