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Paul
September 12th 04, 07:34 PM
Hi;

I have my own personal impression about overtraining, which I would like
some feedback on, since I don't know if it is right or not.

I've assummed you can't overtrain in one day -- that is, overtraining
comes from working out too frequently & not giving your muscles enough
days to recover. My feeling has been if you take enough time between
workouts, you can train pretty intensely in a given session -- within
reason.

I'd like to focus on my chest, for example, so I give it a pretty
intensive workout -- 5 sets of benches to failure, then incline benches,
then dumbell flies then machine flies; for example. Then I take 3 days
off & train again on the fourth day.

I used to work out quite a bit for a few years, then got distracted for
the last 12 years, & now trying to get back into it. I'm older now
(45), & maybe the body of wisdom has changed as well, so I'm trying to
figure out a sensible way to go forward from here.

Thanks for any advice,

Paul

Martin Shuster
September 12th 04, 08:01 PM
On 2004-09-12 14:34:00 -0400, Paul > said:

> Hi;
>
> I have my own personal impression about overtraining, which I would like
> some feedback on, since I don't know if it is right or not.
>
> I've assummed you can't overtrain in one day -- that is, overtraining
> comes from working out too frequently & not giving your muscles enough
> days to recover. My feeling has been if you take enough time between
> workouts, you can train pretty intensely in a given session -- within
> reason.
>
> I'd like to focus on my chest, for example, so I give it a pretty
> intensive workout -- 5 sets of benches to failure, then incline benches,
> then dumbell flies then machine flies; for example. Then I take 3 days
> off & train again on the fourth day.
>
> I used to work out quite a bit for a few years, then got distracted for
> the last 12 years, & now trying to get back into it. I'm older now
> (45), & maybe the body of wisdom has changed as well, so I'm trying to
> figure out a sensible way to go forward from here.
>
> Thanks for any advice,
>
> Paul

If you're going to failure on all of those sets you are probably overtraining.

Overtraining can essentially occur on several levels: neurological (if
you go to failure all the time), endocrine (you train for too long
and/or too frequently), or muscular (you hurt yourself).

I think you need to decide what your goals are and work from there.


--

Martin Shuster

vanity at jhu dot edu

*printed on recycled electrons*

Ben Gussey
September 13th 04, 06:03 AM
"Paul" > wrote in message
. ..
> Hi;
>
> I have my own personal impression about overtraining, which I would like
> some feedback on, since I don't know if it is right or not.
>
> I've assummed you can't overtrain in one day -- that is, overtraining
> comes from working out too frequently & not giving your muscles enough
> days to recover. My feeling has been if you take enough time between
> workouts, you can train pretty intensely in a given session -- within
> reason.
>
> I'd like to focus on my chest, for example, so I give it a pretty
> intensive workout -- 5 sets of benches to failure, then incline benches,
> then dumbell flies then machine flies; for example. Then I take 3 days
> off & train again on the fourth day.
>
> I used to work out quite a bit for a few years, then got distracted for
> the last 12 years, & now trying to get back into it. I'm older now
> (45), & maybe the body of wisdom has changed as well, so I'm trying to
> figure out a sensible way to go forward from here.
>
> Thanks for any advice,
>
> Paul

You have to ask yourself what benefit you are getting from going to failure
for 5 sets? And is it more beneficial than going to failure on just one set?
I would suggest it is not.

Regards,
Ben.

Paul
September 13th 04, 09:19 AM
Ben Gussey wrote:

> "Paul" > wrote in message
> . ..
>
>>Hi;
>>
>>I have my own personal impression about overtraining, which I would like
>>some feedback on, since I don't know if it is right or not.
>>
>>I've assummed you can't overtrain in one day -- that is, overtraining
>>comes from working out too frequently & not giving your muscles enough
>>days to recover. My feeling has been if you take enough time between
>>workouts, you can train pretty intensely in a given session -- within
>>reason.
>>
>>I'd like to focus on my chest, for example, so I give it a pretty
>>intensive workout -- 5 sets of benches to failure, then incline benches,
>>then dumbell flies then machine flies; for example. Then I take 3 days
>>off & train again on the fourth day.
>>
>>I used to work out quite a bit for a few years, then got distracted for
>>the last 12 years, & now trying to get back into it. I'm older now
>>(45), & maybe the body of wisdom has changed as well, so I'm trying to
>>figure out a sensible way to go forward from here.
>>
>>Thanks for any advice,
>>
>>Paul
>
>
> You have to ask yourself what benefit you are getting from going to failure
> for 5 sets? And is it more beneficial than going to failure on just one set?
> I would suggest it is not.

Well, I guess that's pretty much what I was trying to ask the group. So
if the concensus is that 1-3 sets to failure is more reasonable than
5; what about the interval?

Some say 48 hrs between working the same muscle groups; some say a week.
Is there also an age factor in the recovery time? I would imagine it
wouldn't be the same for a 20 yr old as a 50 year old. I also imagine
it would be different for someone who is highly conditioned and has been
training intensely for several years, vs. someone who is not in
condition and only starting out.

Any theories? Or even better, facts?

Paul

Ben Gussey
September 13th 04, 01:51 PM
"Paul" > wrote in message
. ..
>
> Well, I guess that's pretty much what I was trying to ask the group. So
> if the concensus is that 1-3 sets to failure is more reasonable than
> 5; what about the interval?
>
> Some say 48 hrs between working the same muscle groups; some say a week.
> Is there also an age factor in the recovery time? I would imagine it
> wouldn't be the same for a 20 yr old as a 50 year old. I also imagine
> it would be different for someone who is highly conditioned and has been
> training intensely for several years, vs. someone who is not in
> condition and only starting out.
>
> Any theories? Or even better, facts?
>
> Paul

I think just about all bodybuilding - related to training - is theoretical.
I haven't seen too many routines backed with much in the way of factual
information. Personally, I think twice a week with 1-2 working sets is
optimal.

Regards,
Ben.

Mistress Krista
September 13th 04, 01:51 PM
"Ben Gussey" > wrote in message
u...
> "Paul" > wrote in message
> . ..
> >
> > Well, I guess that's pretty much what I was trying to ask the group. So
> > if the concensus is that 1-3 sets to failure is more reasonable than
> > 5; what about the interval?
> >
> > Some say 48 hrs between working the same muscle groups; some say a week.
> > Is there also an age factor in the recovery time? I would imagine it
> > wouldn't be the same for a 20 yr old as a 50 year old. I also imagine
> > it would be different for someone who is highly conditioned and has been
> > training intensely for several years, vs. someone who is not in
> > condition and only starting out.
> >
> > Any theories? Or even better, facts?
> >
> > Paul
>
> I think just about all bodybuilding - related to training - is
theoretical.
> I haven't seen too many routines backed with much in the way of factual
> information. Personally, I think twice a week with 1-2 working sets is
> optimal.
>


And out of curiosity, what factual information is that recommendation based
on?


Krista

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mistresskrista at stumptuous dot com