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T
September 13th 04, 03:54 AM
I am about 5'10, 165lbs.

I realized the other day, I only eat around 1400 calories a day.

This is due to a combination of, laziness and lack of time to make
more food, and not that big of an appetite.

So I think I should supplement.

Should I look for a protein powder, or a MRP?

I went to GNC, and I noticed that the MRP seems to be a lot more
expensive.

Thanks

London_Matt
September 13th 04, 11:51 AM
(T) wrote in message >...

> This is due to a combination of, laziness and lack of time to make
> more food, and not that big of an appetite.

I'm in a similar boat -- about the same body build and the same lack
of appetite, lack of time, and general laziness.

> So I think I should supplement.

You need to add more calories to your diet. It all depends on the
brand, but two meal replacement shakes will generally add around 600
calories and 80g of protein a day to your diet. Two protein shakes is
likely to provide closer to 250-300 calories and 60-70g of protein a
day.

I find that an MRP first thing in the morning and last thing in the
evening are easy supplements to add into my daily routine. It only
takes a few minutes.

> I went to GNC, and I noticed that the MRP seems to be a lot more expensive.

All in all, it isn't that expensive. I like Protoplex - it's got a
decent texture and actually tastes pretty good:

http://www.hollandandbarrett.com/pages/file.asp?xs=21124C6019FF4F6C8E11EC9FADF5F83B&PPID=425&PID=629&np=3

They often run sales on this at 20/case. That's 2/day, which
doesn't seem too excessive to me. It's cheaper than beer, and much
better for me in the long run.

You should also look at other ways to add more calories to your diet
-- olive oil is an easy one -- a few tablespoons are easy to
incorporate into your diet, and can provide 200-300 calories a day.
Between that and the MRPs, you can easily add nearly 1000 calories a
day to your diet without substantially changing your eating habits.

I tried to seriously change my eating habits during bulking, but it
just didn't work for me. The only way I was able to add in the
calories was to 'sneak' them into my regular diet. Otherwise, I just
wasn't able to remain committed enough to consume the volumes of food
required.

Good luck.

Anna Martelli Ravenscroft
September 13th 04, 12:06 PM
On Sun, 12 Sep 2004 19:54:23 -0700, T wrote:

> I am about 5'10, 165lbs.

Male or female?

> I realized the other day, I only eat around 1400 calories a day.
>
> This is due to a combination of, laziness and lack of time to make more
> food, and not that big of an appetite.

Try adding a snack into your day. I've been working on this myself -
adding a can of tuna as a snack. It's small enough that it doesn't
interfere with my appetite at mealtime, and adds a lot of protein for low
fat (if you get tuna in water) - although if you're trying to up your
calories, tuna in oil might be worth it, particularly if you can get
tuna in olive oil.

> So I think I should supplement.

First, work on your eating habits. If you don't develop good eating
habits, supplementing is kindof a waste of money and time.

> Should I look for a
protein powder, or a MRP?
>
> I went to GNC, and I noticed that the MRP seems to be a lot more
> expensive.

I mostly have started using protein powder recently because I live in the
center of pasta country, and it's very hard to get enough protein (I cook
for my husband and he is very strongly attached to eating pasta),
and because it's far easier for me to get a quick protein shake right
after a workout. (And because I love yogurt smoothies anyway - so I just
add the protein to something I would be making anyway for a snack.)

Using protein shakes right after a workout to get the protein to your
muscles when they can best use it seems sensible. Using it because you're
not eating enough overall, to me, seems a bit of a waste of money. Work on
the eating first - if you're still having trouble getting enough protein,
then supplement. IMHO, YMMV, etc etc...

Anna

Donovan Rebbechi
September 13th 04, 01:35 PM
On 2004-09-13, T > wrote:
> I am about 5'10, 165lbs.
>
> I realized the other day, I only eat around 1400 calories a day.
>
> This is due to a combination of, laziness and lack of time to make
> more food, and not that big of an appetite.
>
> So I think I should supplement.
>
> Should I look for a protein powder, or a MRP?
>
> I went to GNC, and I noticed that the MRP seems to be a lot more
> expensive.

MRPs are more expensive. Even whey powder is expensive if you buy it retail
at GNC. Take a look at online stores (e.g. muscledepot.com). Prolab and Optimum
Nutrition have cheap whey powders that are used by many in this forum.

Cheers,
--
Donovan Rebbechi
http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/

Anna Martelli Ravenscroft
September 13th 04, 04:16 PM
London_Matt wrote:

> (T) wrote in message >...
>
>
>>This is due to a combination of, laziness and lack of time to make
>>more food, and not that big of an appetite.
>
>
> I'm in a similar boat -- about the same body build and the same lack
> of appetite, lack of time, and general laziness.
>
>>So I think I should supplement.
>
>
> You need to add more calories to your diet. It all depends on the
> brand, but two meal replacement shakes will generally add around 600
> calories and 80g of protein a day to your diet. Two protein shakes is
> likely to provide closer to 250-300 calories and 60-70g of protein a
> day.
>
> I find that an MRP first thing in the morning and last thing in the
> evening are easy supplements to add into my daily routine. It only
> takes a few minutes.


Um, this looks like an eating habit to me.

> You should also look at other ways to add more calories to your diet
> -- olive oil is an easy one -- a few tablespoons are easy to
> incorporate into your diet, and can provide 200-300 calories a day.
> Between that and the MRPs, you can easily add nearly 1000 calories a
> day to your diet without substantially changing your eating habits.
>
> I tried to seriously change my eating habits during bulking, but it
> just didn't work for me. The only way I was able to add in the
> calories was to 'sneak' them into my regular diet. Otherwise, I just
> wasn't able to remain committed enough to consume the volumes of food
> required.

Curious - how do you find commitment to make supplements twice daily?
Adding in calories with olive oil and such, and making shakes morning
and evening -- I'd consider that a pretty serious commitment to changing
your eating habits...

Would it feel different to you if it was "I eat a couple hardboiled eggs
every morning and open a can of tuna every night"? Either way, you're
making a habit to take in nutrients twice a day MORE than you were
otherwise... Just doing it with "supplements" instead of with regular food.

Perhaps it's a perspective or definition thing? Or a psychological
"trick" to get past a block against cooking or eating?

Just curious. For me, I just use the shake where I already was having a
snack. If I didn't already have the snack as part of my regular routine,
I would consider adding that shake as changing my eating habits - but
since I already had the habit, it wasn't a change... I guess, if I
couldn't add the habit of snacking at certain times, I wouldn't expect
to be able to do the shake either.

Hrmmm...
Anna

London_Matt
September 14th 04, 11:09 AM
Anna Martelli Ravenscroft > wrote in message >...

> Um, this looks like an eating habit to me.

> Curious - how do you find commitment to make supplements twice daily?
> Adding in calories with olive oil and such, and making shakes morning
> and evening -- I'd consider that a pretty serious commitment to changing
> your eating habits...

I suppose we're talking about shades of grey. When I initially
started training, I tried to supplement my diet using conventional
foods -- eating five meals a day, large amounts of lean meat, nuts,
etc. In the end, I found that the effort to add these foods into my
diet sufficiently high as to be a disincentive.

In short, I was too lazy to make this level of change in my diet. But
I found that adding two shakes a day and 'sneaking' oil into my food
provided the same results with a level-of-effort that I could maintain
over the longer term. Does it take commitment and discipline? Yes,
of course. Do I occasionally skip a shake if it's really late and I'm
tired? Yep, but not very often.

> Perhaps it's a perspective or definition thing? Or a psychological
> "trick" to get past a block against cooking or eating?

This is the other factor. I find it really tough to eat when I'm not
hungry, but I can drink a shake nearly anytime. It doesn't leave me
feeling bloated and overfull, and I never feel I need to 'force'
myself to get it down.

In any case, I've found a system that works for me. It's easy enough
to stick to, requires little effort, and meets my nutritional
objectives.

Now if only they started making the shakes in beer flavour...

John HUDSON
September 14th 04, 11:16 AM
On 14 Sep 2004 03:09:54 -0700, (London_Matt)
wrote:

>Anna Martelli Ravenscroft > wrote in message >...
>
>> Um, this looks like an eating habit to me.
>
>> Curious - how do you find commitment to make supplements twice daily?
>> Adding in calories with olive oil and such, and making shakes morning
>> and evening -- I'd consider that a pretty serious commitment to changing
>> your eating habits...
>
>I suppose we're talking about shades of grey. When I initially
>started training, I tried to supplement my diet using conventional
>foods -- eating five meals a day, large amounts of lean meat, nuts,
>etc. In the end, I found that the effort to add these foods into my
>diet sufficiently high as to be a disincentive.
>
>In short, I was too lazy to make this level of change in my diet. But
>I found that adding two shakes a day and 'sneaking' oil into my food
>provided the same results with a level-of-effort that I could maintain
>over the longer term. Does it take commitment and discipline? Yes,
>of course. Do I occasionally skip a shake if it's really late and I'm
>tired? Yep, but not very often.
>
>> Perhaps it's a perspective or definition thing? Or a psychological
>> "trick" to get past a block against cooking or eating?
>
>This is the other factor. I find it really tough to eat when I'm not
>hungry, but I can drink a shake nearly anytime. It doesn't leave me
>feeling bloated and overfull, and I never feel I need to 'force'
>myself to get it down.
>
>In any case, I've found a system that works for me. It's easy enough
>to stick to, requires little effort, and meets my nutritional
>objectives.

And of course with a blender you can add other nutritional items
quickly and easily, so there is much scope for inventiveness. I find
my whey protein shakes absolutely invaluable.

>
>Now if only they started making the shakes in beer flavour...

Now you're really talking Matt. How about adding a little hop extract
to the shake? ;o)

Anna Martelli Ravenscroft
September 15th 04, 01:05 PM
London_Matt wrote:

> Anna Martelli Ravenscroft > wrote in message >...
>
>
>>Um, this looks like an eating habit to me.
>
>
>>Curious - how do you find commitment to make supplements twice daily?
>>Adding in calories with olive oil and such, and making shakes morning
>>and evening -- I'd consider that a pretty serious commitment to changing
>>your eating habits...
>
>
> I suppose we're talking about shades of grey. When I initially
> started training, I tried to supplement my diet using conventional
> foods -- eating five meals a day, large amounts of lean meat, nuts,
> etc. In the end, I found that the effort to add these foods into my
> diet sufficiently high as to be a disincentive.
>
> In short, I was too lazy to make this level of change in my diet. But
> I found that adding two shakes a day and 'sneaking' oil into my food
> provided the same results with a level-of-effort that I could maintain
> over the longer term. Does it take commitment and discipline? Yes,
> of course. Do I occasionally skip a shake if it's really late and I'm
> tired? Yep, but not very often.

Okay. I guess that makes sense.

>>Perhaps it's a perspective or definition thing? Or a psychological
>>"trick" to get past a block against cooking or eating?
>
>
> This is the other factor. I find it really tough to eat when I'm not
> hungry, but I can drink a shake nearly anytime. It doesn't leave me
> feeling bloated and overfull, and I never feel I need to 'force'
> myself to get it down.

Ah - that does make a lot of sense to me. I don't tend to feel hungry
after a heavy workout, but drinking a shake (or in the past, a smoothie)
never bothered me.

> In any case, I've found a system that works for me. It's easy enough
> to stick to, requires little effort, and meets my nutritional
> objectives.

That certainly is the name of the game. Thanks for answering and helping
me understand better.

> Now if only they started making the shakes in beer flavour...

Heh - the chocolate ones work really well for me. ;-)

Anna

bc
September 15th 04, 10:14 PM
Anna Martelli Ravenscroft > wrote in message >...
> On Sun, 12 Sep 2004 19:54:23 -0700, T wrote:
>
> > I am about 5'10, 165lbs.
>
> Male or female?
>
> > I realized the other day, I only eat around 1400 calories a day.
> >
> > This is due to a combination of, laziness and lack of time to make more
> > food, and not that big of an appetite.
>
> Try adding a snack into your day. I've been working on this myself -
> adding a can of tuna as a snack. It's small enough that it doesn't
> interfere with my appetite at mealtime, and adds a lot of protein for low
> fat (if you get tuna in water) - although if you're trying to up your
> calories, tuna in oil might be worth it, particularly if you can get
> tuna in olive oil.
>
> > So I think I should supplement.
>
> First, work on your eating habits. If you don't develop good eating
> habits, supplementing is kindof a waste of money and time.
>
> > Should I look for a
> protein powder, or a MRP?
> >
> > I went to GNC, and I noticed that the MRP seems to be a lot more
> > expensive.
>
> I mostly have started using protein powder recently because I live in the
> center of pasta country, and it's very hard to get enough protein (I cook
> for my husband and he is very strongly attached to eating pasta),
> and because it's far easier for me to get a quick protein shake right
> after a workout. (And because I love yogurt smoothies anyway - so I just
> add the protein to something I would be making anyway for a snack.)
>
> Using protein shakes right after a workout to get the protein to your
> muscles when they can best use it seems sensible. Using it because you're
> not eating enough overall, to me, seems a bit of a waste of money. Work on
> the eating first - if you're still having trouble getting enough protein,
> then supplement. IMHO, YMMV, etc etc...
>
> Anna


If I'm in a hurry and expect to have to eat on the run, a banana,
maybe another piece of fruit too, some nuts, a shot of protein powder,
and yogurt in the blender is easy to do and easy to take with in a
travel mug with a lid. Just add milk or water as needed to make it
thin enough to drink through the little hole. Sometime, I throw my
vitamins in there too. Can't even taste them, except the orange
flavored C's add a little tang, but that's ok. If you needed to add
more calories, throw in some malt or peanut butter or hell, even a
snickers if you want. I don't, unfortunately, happen to be in the
position of wanting to add extra calories.

- bc

Anna Martelli Ravenscroft
September 16th 04, 07:22 PM
bc wrote:

> Anna Martelli Ravenscroft > wrote in message >...

>>Using protein shakes right after a workout to get the protein to your
>>muscles when they can best use it seems sensible. Using it because you're
>>not eating enough overall, to me, seems a bit of a waste of money. Work on
>>the eating first - if you're still having trouble getting enough protein,
>>then supplement. IMHO, YMMV, etc etc...
>>
>>Anna
>
>
>
> If I'm in a hurry and expect to have to eat on the run, a banana,
> maybe another piece of fruit too, some nuts, a shot of protein powder,
> and yogurt in the blender is easy to do and easy to take with in a
> travel mug with a lid. Just add milk or water as needed to make it
> thin enough to drink through the little hole. Sometime, I throw my
> vitamins in there too. Can't even taste them, except the orange
> flavored C's add a little tang, but that's ok. If you needed to add
> more calories, throw in some malt or peanut butter or hell, even a
> snickers if you want. I don't, unfortunately, happen to be in the
> position of wanting to add extra calories.

Smoothies are great. I buy a bunch of fruit (whatever's in season), and
when it's getting to that point where it's getting over-ripe, I take and
blend up all of what's left, put it in icecube trays, then keep the
cubes in the freezer for future smoothies.

I got some neutral whey powder the other day - and it goes great in the
fruit smoothies. And peanut butter and banana are yummy with chocolate
powder.

Anna
--
Also not in the position of wanting to add extra calories...