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Robert B.
September 13th 04, 05:33 PM
On another fitness board (http://forums.johnstonefitness.com/showthread.php?t=8386) they are
saying that in order not to plateau with your weight training you have to train to soreness
and/or change the exercises you do every 6-8 weeks. I'm dubious of this and wonder if maybe
it is enough for me to continue doing the same full-body routine with free weights (mostly
compound exercises like squats, deadlifts, chinups, military presses, etc.) while increasing
reps/weight as tolerated and without regard to whether it makes me sore or not. I'm making
reasonable gains but wonder if I should be changing my routine every few weeks like they
advocate over there. I'd appreciate any info/opinions you guys and gals have on this.

--

Mistress Krista
September 13th 04, 06:04 PM
"Robert B." > wrote in message
.. .
> On another fitness board
(http://forums.johnstonefitness.com/showthread.php?t=8386) they are
> saying that in order not to plateau with your weight training you have to
train to soreness


Crap.

> and/or change the exercises you do every 6-8 weeks.


Also crap.


> I'm dubious of this and wonder if maybe
> it is enough for me to continue doing the same full-body routine with free
weights (mostly
> compound exercises like squats, deadlifts, chinups, military presses,
etc.) while increasing
> reps/weight as tolerated and without regard to whether it makes me sore or
not.


Yes.

> I'm making
> reasonable gains


Nuff said.

Experienced trainers do often find that there is benefit in intelligent
intensity and volume variation. For example, it is common to periodize
intensity and volume either in a linear fashion (intensity increases while
volume decreases), or in a wave fashion (intensity and volume
increase/decrease in a sort of generally ascending up and down pattern), a
conjugate pattern (heavy and light days in the same week), or perhaps in a
fashion oriented towards seasonal competition (e.g. postcompetition/rehab,
offseason, preseason, in-season, etc.). One of my preferred arrangements is
heavy and light/speed days, 2 each per week. This works well for me as
someone who engages in other activities such as martial arts, cycling, and
climbing. I can, for example, balance the lower body demands of cycling and
the speed/power demands of martial arts and not burn out too much with heavy
training. Some folks like a fairly rudimentary 4 week arrangement with 1
heavy, 2 medium, and 1 light week. There are lots of ways to skin the
periodization cat.

However this type of planned variation should not be confused with change
for the sake of change, which is largely a mainstream fitness myth. Change
can serve a psychological need if you are a person who is easily bored, but
the downside of pointless change is that it becomes very difficult to
monitor progress.


Krista

--
http://www.stumptuous.com/weights.html
http://www.trans-health.com
mistresskrista at stumptuous dot com

John HUDSON
September 13th 04, 06:57 PM
On Mon, 13 Sep 2004 11:33:34 -0500, Robert B. >
wrote:

>On another fitness board (http://forums.johnstonefitness.com/showthread.php?t=8386) they are
>saying that in order not to plateau with your weight training you have to train to soreness
>and/or change the exercises you do every 6-8 weeks. I'm dubious of this and wonder if maybe
>it is enough for me to continue doing the same full-body routine with free weights (mostly
>compound exercises like squats, deadlifts, chinups, military presses, etc.) while increasing
>reps/weight as tolerated and without regard to whether it makes me sore or not. I'm making
>reasonable gains but wonder if I should be changing my routine every few weeks like they
>advocate over there. I'd appreciate any info/opinions you guys and gals have on this.

If what you are doing is producing gains, and that is what you are
working for, then that is what you should continue doing. There is no
point at all attempting an exercise schedule aimed at making sure you
are "sore" all the time.

Your programme must be progressive to be effective, but you appear to
be aware of that. You may want to vary what you do to avoid boredom,
and doing pyramids or varying the weights and reps on some days will
achieve this.

If and when you reach a plateau you make have to think again and an
HST programme may be the way to overcome such and eventuality. See:

http://www.hypertrophy-specific.com/hst_artcls_stratdecon.html

Top Sirloin
September 13th 04, 08:23 PM
Robert B. wrote:

> On another fitness board (http://forums.johnstonefitness.com/showthread.php?t=8386) they are
> saying that in order not to plateau with your weight training you have to train to soreness
> and/or change the exercises you do every 6-8 weeks. I'm dubious of this and wonder if maybe
> it is enough for me to continue doing the same full-body routine with free weights (mostly
> compound exercises like squats, deadlifts, chinups, military presses, etc.) while increasing
> reps/weight as tolerated and without regard to whether it makes me sore or not. I'm making
> reasonable gains but wonder if I should be changing my routine every few weeks like they
> advocate over there. I'd appreciate any info/opinions you guys and gals have on this.

That dude knows how to diet but he's not exactly
the poster boy for hypertrophy.

--
Scott Johnson / scottjohnson at kc dot rr dot com

Robert B.
September 14th 04, 01:27 PM
In article . rogers.com>,
says...

> One of my preferred arrangements is
> heavy and light/speed days, 2 each per week. This works well for me as
> someone who engages in other activities such as martial arts, cycling, and
> climbing. I can, for example, balance the lower body demands of cycling and
> the speed/power demands of martial arts and not burn out too much with heavy
> training. Some folks like a fairly rudimentary 4 week arrangement with 1
> heavy, 2 medium, and 1 light week. There are lots of ways to skin the
> periodization cat.

Krista,

Thanks. By "light" week do you mean lighter weights and more reps (approx. same overall
workload) or a lighter overall workout, i.e. lighter weights and/or lower reps?



--

bc
September 14th 04, 09:59 PM
Top Sirloin > wrote in message >...
> Robert B. wrote:
>
> > On another fitness board (http://forums.johnstonefitness.com/showthread.php?t=8386) they are
> > saying that in order not to plateau with your weight training you have to train to soreness
> > and/or change the exercises you do every 6-8 weeks. I'm dubious of this and wonder if maybe
> > it is enough for me to continue doing the same full-body routine with free weights (mostly
> > compound exercises like squats, deadlifts, chinups, military presses, etc.) while increasing
> > reps/weight as tolerated and without regard to whether it makes me sore or not. I'm making
> > reasonable gains but wonder if I should be changing my routine every few weeks like they
> > advocate over there. I'd appreciate any info/opinions you guys and gals have on this.
>
> That dude knows how to diet but he's not exactly
> the poster boy for hypertrophy.

I think you answered your own question Robert B. If you're still
making gains, you aren't experiencing a plateau. Don't worry 'bout
it.

- bc

Robert B.
September 15th 04, 12:33 PM
In article >,
says...

>
> I think you answered your own question Robert B. If you're still
> making gains, you aren't experiencing a plateau.

Yeah, I know. I was just wondering if I would make faster gains if I followed the advice
from the other web site. Sound like I don't need to. :)

--

Wayne S. Hill
September 15th 04, 01:46 PM
Robert B. wrote:

> says...
>
>> I think you answered your own question Robert B. If you're
>> still making gains, you aren't experiencing a plateau.
>
> Yeah, I know. I was just wondering if I would make faster
> gains if I followed the advice from the other web site.
> Sound like I don't need to. :)

Not only that, but arbitrarily changing your routine will slow
your gains, because you'll have to retrain yourself neurally
(during which the muscular training effect is reduced).

--
-Wayne

bc
September 15th 04, 10:52 PM
"Wayne S. Hill" > wrote in message >...
> Robert B. wrote:
>
> > says...
> >
> >> I think you answered your own question Robert B. If you're
> >> still making gains, you aren't experiencing a plateau.
> >
> > Yeah, I know. I was just wondering if I would make faster
> > gains if I followed the advice from the other web site.
> > Sound like I don't need to. :)
>
> Not only that, but arbitrarily changing your routine will slow
> your gains, because you'll have to retrain yourself neurally
> (during which the muscular training effect is reduced).

Time to drag out the old "Weider Muscle Confusion Principle." That
one always made me chuckle. Hell, my muscles have enough problems
learning what to do without my intentional intervention with the
process.

- bc