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bc
September 13th 04, 09:23 PM
"Stop if you feel dizzy, faint, or short of breath." I'm trying to do
HIIT on the stairmaster and that's their warning? Not helpful at all.

It'd be better if they said, "We're not responsible, but Go Till it
Hurts, Then Do More."

Well, at least it gave me a chuckle anyway. I know it's there for CYA
legal reasons, but somewhere, someone will probably heed that advice
and fail to die, so I guess it's a good thing.

- bc

Dally
September 13th 04, 09:38 PM
bc wrote:

> "Stop if you feel dizzy, faint, or short of breath." I'm trying to do
> HIIT on the stairmaster and that's their warning? Not helpful at all.
>
> It'd be better if they said, "We're not responsible, but Go Till it
> Hurts, Then Do More."
>
> Well, at least it gave me a chuckle anyway. I know it's there for CYA
> legal reasons, but somewhere, someone will probably heed that advice
> and fail to die, so I guess it's a good thing.
>
> - bc

Ever get an urge to correct the signs? I sometimes do. Every now and
then I'll vandalize one. (My gym is famous for assinine signs everywhere.)

We've got a mysterious sign up in our weight room that I've never
understood. I believe it says, "no tape on collars". I've always
wondered why they have that prominantly placed on all four walls. I've
never seen anyone ever use tape in the weight room and I don't even know
what they mean by collars in this case and why anyone would want to tape
them. Care to educate me?

BTW, no signs about chalk. There's one asking you not to spit in the
drinking fountain, though.

Dally

Lyle McDonald
September 13th 04, 09:42 PM
bc wrote:
> "Stop if you feel dizzy, faint, or short of breath." I'm trying to do
> HIIT on the stairmaster and that's their warning? Not helpful at all.
>
> It'd be better if they said, "We're not responsible, but Go Till it
> Hurts, Then Do More."
>
> Well, at least it gave me a chuckle anyway. I know it's there for CYA
> legal reasons, but somewhere, someone will probably heed that advice
> and fail to die, so I guess it's a good thing.
>
> - bc

Yeah, I always giggle at those. their descriptoin of when to stop a
workout is when I consider it to start having some utility in actually
increasing my fitness.

Of course, could be worse. The sign on the wall of my new gym says to
stop training if you get 'nautious'.

Lyle

Lee Michaels
September 14th 04, 01:38 AM
"Lyle McDonald" wrote
>
> Of course, could be worse. The sign on the wall of my new gym says to
> stop training if you get 'nautious'.
>
I assume that is a queasy feeling from doing too much nautilus?

Lee Michaels
September 14th 04, 01:39 AM
"Dally" > wrote
>
> Ever get an urge to correct the signs? I sometimes do. Every now and
> then I'll vandalize one. (My gym is famous for assinine signs
everywhere.)
>
> We've got a mysterious sign up in our weight room that I've never
> understood. I believe it says, "no tape on collars". I've always
> wondered why they have that prominantly placed on all four walls. I've
> never seen anyone ever use tape in the weight room and I don't even know
> what they mean by collars in this case and why anyone would want to tape
> them. Care to educate me?
>
Here is what you do Dally.

Sneak in some duct tape. Tape a bunch of weights together.

Then watch what happens.

John HUDSON
September 14th 04, 08:11 AM
On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 00:38:05 GMT, "Lee Michaels"
> wrote:

>
>"Lyle McDonald" wrote
>>
>> Of course, could be worse. The sign on the wall of my new gym says to
>> stop training if you get 'nautious'.
>>
>I assume that is a queasy feeling from doing too much nautilus?
>

Oh la!! The humour is returning!!

(That's sarcasm Wendy) <squirming>

John HUDSON
September 14th 04, 08:15 AM
On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 00:39:47 GMT, "Lee Michaels"
> wrote:

>
>"Dally" > wrote
>>
>> Ever get an urge to correct the signs? I sometimes do. Every now and
>> then I'll vandalize one. (My gym is famous for assinine signs
>everywhere.)
>>
>> We've got a mysterious sign up in our weight room that I've never
>> understood. I believe it says, "no tape on collars". I've always
>> wondered why they have that prominantly placed on all four walls. I've
>> never seen anyone ever use tape in the weight room and I don't even know
>> what they mean by collars in this case and why anyone would want to tape
>> them. Care to educate me?
>>
>Here is what you do Dally.
>
>Sneak in some duct tape. Tape a bunch of weights together.
>
>Then watch what happens.

This is the return to traditional MFW humour for which I was
yearning!!

(More sarcasm Wendy) <more squirming with embarrassment>

Tiger Hillside
September 14th 04, 03:09 PM
On 13 Sep 2004 13:23:25 -0700, (bc)
wrote:

>"Stop if you feel dizzy, faint, or short of breath." I'm trying to do
>HIIT on the stairmaster and that's their warning? Not helpful at all.
>
>It'd be better if they said, "We're not responsible, but Go Till it
>Hurts, Then Do More."
>
>Well, at least it gave me a chuckle anyway. I know it's there for CYA
>legal reasons, but somewhere, someone will probably heed that advice
>and fail to die, so I guess it's a good thing.

My club has a sign advertising pre-natal massage. I tried to tell them
that it is probably much to late for that for all of us, but I just
get a blank stare in response.

Tiger Hillside
September 14th 04, 03:10 PM
On Mon, 13 Sep 2004 14:42:32 -0600, Lyle McDonald
> wrote:

>bc wrote:
>> "Stop if you feel dizzy, faint, or short of breath." I'm trying to do
>> HIIT on the stairmaster and that's their warning? Not helpful at all.
>>
>> It'd be better if they said, "We're not responsible, but Go Till it
>> Hurts, Then Do More."
>>
>> Well, at least it gave me a chuckle anyway. I know it's there for CYA
>> legal reasons, but somewhere, someone will probably heed that advice
>> and fail to die, so I guess it's a good thing.
>>
>> - bc
>
>Yeah, I always giggle at those. their descriptoin of when to stop a
>workout is when I consider it to start having some utility in actually
>increasing my fitness.
>
>Of course, could be worse. The sign on the wall of my new gym says to
>stop training if you get 'nautious'.

Isn't that when you get sick of boats?

Dally
September 14th 04, 05:41 PM
John HUDSON wrote:

> (More sarcasm Wendy) <more squirming with embarrassment>

Okay, I'll bite. What are you blathering about now?

Dally

John HUDSON
September 14th 04, 06:10 PM
On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 12:41:35 -0400, Dally > wrote:

>John HUDSON wrote:
>
>> (More sarcasm Wendy) <more squirming with embarrassment>
>
>Okay, I'll bite. What are you blathering about now?

"Blathering"? mmmmm....

It was nothing to do with you my sweetheart, read the attributions. I
drew it to your attention because some time ago you were having
problems with sarcasm.

Read the attributions: I was taking the **** out of Lee for his
pathetic attempt at humour, after I earlier complained about the
decline of the former bitingly funny typical MFW humour.

You snipped the relevant bits which read:

Dally said:

>> We've got a mysterious sign up in our weight room that I've never
>> understood. I believe it says, "no tape on collars". I've always
>> wondered why they have that prominantly placed on all four walls. I've
>> never seen anyone ever use tape in the weight room and I don't even know
>> what they mean by collars in this case and why anyone would want to tape
>> them. Care to educate me?
>>

Lee said:

>Here is what you do Dally.
>
>Sneak in some duct tape. Tape a bunch of weights together.
>
>Then watch what happens.

John said:

"This is the return to traditional MFW humour for which I was
yearning!!

(More sarcasm Wendy) <more squirming with embarrassment>"

Geddit?

[sarcasm loses its pith when you have to explain it]

Dally
September 14th 04, 06:16 PM
John HUDSON wrote:

> On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 12:41:35 -0400, Dally > wrote:
>
>
>>John HUDSON wrote:
>>
>>
>>>(More sarcasm Wendy) <more squirming with embarrassment>
>>
>>Okay, I'll bite. What are you blathering about now?
>
>
> "Blathering"? mmmmm....
>
> It was nothing to do with you my sweetheart, read the attributions. I
> drew it to your attention because some time ago you were having
> problems with sarcasm.
>
> Read the attributions: I was taking the **** out of Lee for his
> pathetic attempt at humour, after I earlier complained about the
> decline of the former bitingly funny typical MFW humour.
>
> You snipped the relevant bits which read:
>
> Dally said:
>
>
>>>We've got a mysterious sign up in our weight room that I've never
>>>understood. I believe it says, "no tape on collars". I've always
>>>wondered why they have that prominantly placed on all four walls. I've
>>>never seen anyone ever use tape in the weight room and I don't even know
>>>what they mean by collars in this case and why anyone would want to tape
>>>them. Care to educate me?
>>>
>
>
> Lee said:
>
>
>>Here is what you do Dally.
>>
>>Sneak in some duct tape. Tape a bunch of weights together.
>>
>>Then watch what happens.
>
>
> John said:
>
> "This is the return to traditional MFW humour for which I was
> yearning!!
>
> (More sarcasm Wendy) <more squirming with embarrassment>"
>
> Geddit?
>
> [sarcasm loses its pith when you have to explain it]

Oh. Well, humor is pretty subjective, isn't it? As it happens, I had a
pleasant moment imagining what the scene would look like if I duct-taped
a few guys together. I also spared a moment to contemplate my attack
method. I mean, how DO you get them to stand still? And what happens
with the fact that they aren't actually WEARING collars in the weight
room? I'd hate to go for their abdomens, since that's the largest part.

Knees would be better, I think. They wouldn't spot me crawling towards
them since they're gazing adoringly at their pecs and biceps and their
knobby knees are the thinnest part - saves the most tape.

Duct tape sure is useful, isn't it?

Ah well, carry on, thanks for illuminating me on your sorrow over the
lack of humor.

Dally

Dally
September 14th 04, 06:19 PM
> Dally said:
>
>
>>>We've got a mysterious sign up in our weight room that I've never
>>>understood. I believe it says, "no tape on collars". I've always
>>>wondered why they have that prominantly placed on all four walls. I've
>>>never seen anyone ever use tape in the weight room and I don't even know
>>>what they mean by collars in this case and why anyone would want to tape
>>>them. Care to educate me?
>>>
>
>
> Lee said:

>>Here is what you do Dally.
>>
>>Sneak in some duct tape. Tape a bunch of weights together.
>>
>>Then watch what happens.

By the way, I didn't respond to the idea of taping the weights together
because I got so entranced with the idea of taping the weightlifters
together. Sort of a "gay as ****" scenario. But thanks for the mental
prompting.

Dally

Lee Michaels
September 14th 04, 06:20 PM
"Dally" > wrote

> John HUDSON wrote:
>
> > On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 12:41:35 -0400, Dally > wrote:
> >
> >
> >>John HUDSON wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>>(More sarcasm Wendy) <more squirming with embarrassment>
> >>
> >>Okay, I'll bite. What are you blathering about now?
> >
> >
> > "Blathering"? mmmmm....
> >
> > It was nothing to do with you my sweetheart, read the attributions. I
> > drew it to your attention because some time ago you were having
> > problems with sarcasm.
> >
> > Read the attributions: I was taking the **** out of Lee for his
> > pathetic attempt at humour, after I earlier complained about the
> > decline of the former bitingly funny typical MFW humour.
> >
> > You snipped the relevant bits which read:
> >
> > Dally said:
> >
> >
> >>>We've got a mysterious sign up in our weight room that I've never
> >>>understood. I believe it says, "no tape on collars". I've always
> >>>wondered why they have that prominantly placed on all four walls. I've
> >>>never seen anyone ever use tape in the weight room and I don't even
know
> >>>what they mean by collars in this case and why anyone would want to
tape
> >>>them. Care to educate me?
> >>>
> >
> >
> > Lee said:
> >
> >
> >>Here is what you do Dally.
> >>
> >>Sneak in some duct tape. Tape a bunch of weights together.
> >>
> >>Then watch what happens.
> >
> >
> > John said:
> >
> > "This is the return to traditional MFW humour for which I was
> > yearning!!
> >
> > (More sarcasm Wendy) <more squirming with embarrassment>"
> >
> > Geddit?
> >
> > [sarcasm loses its pith when you have to explain it]
>
> Oh. Well, humor is pretty subjective, isn't it? As it happens, I had a
> pleasant moment imagining what the scene would look like if I duct-taped
> a few guys together. I also spared a moment to contemplate my attack
> method. I mean, how DO you get them to stand still? And what happens
> with the fact that they aren't actually WEARING collars in the weight
> room? I'd hate to go for their abdomens, since that's the largest part.
>
> Knees would be better, I think. They wouldn't spot me crawling towards
> them since they're gazing adoringly at their pecs and biceps and their
> knobby knees are the thinnest part - saves the most tape.
>
> Duct tape sure is useful, isn't it?
>
> Ah well, carry on, thanks for illuminating me on your sorrow over the
> lack of humor.
>

<rhetorical question>

Is HUDSON whining again?

<\rhetorical question>

Lee Michaels
September 14th 04, 06:27 PM
"Dally" wrote
>
> By the way, I didn't respond to the idea of taping the weights together
> because I got so entranced with the idea of taping the weightlifters
> together. Sort of a "gay as ****" scenario. But thanks for the mental
> prompting.
>
Well, that is good to know. I will be sure to forward to you every "gay as
****" scenario I can come up with from this time forth.

And you can always tape some gay porn to the weights.

Lyle McDonald
September 14th 04, 06:53 PM
Lee Michaels wrote:

> <rhetorical question>
>
> Is HUDSON whining again?
>
> <\rhetorical question>

Would imply that he is ever NOT whining.
Him and David both, just sit and whine, sit and whine.

Yet they continue to read mfw regularly.

Hrm...

Lyle

John HUDSON
September 14th 04, 07:34 PM
On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 17:20:48 GMT, "Lee Michaels"
> wrote:

>
>"Dally" > wrote
>
>> John HUDSON wrote:
>>
>> > On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 12:41:35 -0400, Dally > wrote:
>> >
>> >
>> >>John HUDSON wrote:
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>>(More sarcasm Wendy) <more squirming with embarrassment>
>> >>
>> >>Okay, I'll bite. What are you blathering about now?
>> >
>> >
>> > "Blathering"? mmmmm....
>> >
>> > It was nothing to do with you my sweetheart, read the attributions. I
>> > drew it to your attention because some time ago you were having
>> > problems with sarcasm.
>> >
>> > Read the attributions: I was taking the **** out of Lee for his
>> > pathetic attempt at humour, after I earlier complained about the
>> > decline of the former bitingly funny typical MFW humour.
>> >
>> > You snipped the relevant bits which read:
>> >
>> > Dally said:
>> >
>> >
>> >>>We've got a mysterious sign up in our weight room that I've never
>> >>>understood. I believe it says, "no tape on collars". I've always
>> >>>wondered why they have that prominantly placed on all four walls. I've
>> >>>never seen anyone ever use tape in the weight room and I don't even
>know
>> >>>what they mean by collars in this case and why anyone would want to
>tape
>> >>>them. Care to educate me?
>> >>>
>> >
>> >
>> > Lee said:
>> >
>> >
>> >>Here is what you do Dally.
>> >>
>> >>Sneak in some duct tape. Tape a bunch of weights together.
>> >>
>> >>Then watch what happens.
>> >
>> >
>> > John said:
>> >
>> > "This is the return to traditional MFW humour for which I was
>> > yearning!!
>> >
>> > (More sarcasm Wendy) <more squirming with embarrassment>"
>> >
>> > Geddit?
>> >
>> > [sarcasm loses its pith when you have to explain it]
>>
>> Oh. Well, humor is pretty subjective, isn't it? As it happens, I had a
>> pleasant moment imagining what the scene would look like if I duct-taped
>> a few guys together. I also spared a moment to contemplate my attack
>> method. I mean, how DO you get them to stand still? And what happens
>> with the fact that they aren't actually WEARING collars in the weight
>> room? I'd hate to go for their abdomens, since that's the largest part.
>>
>> Knees would be better, I think. They wouldn't spot me crawling towards
>> them since they're gazing adoringly at their pecs and biceps and their
>> knobby knees are the thinnest part - saves the most tape.
>>
>> Duct tape sure is useful, isn't it?
>>
>> Ah well, carry on, thanks for illuminating me on your sorrow over the
>> lack of humor.
>>
>
><rhetorical question>
>
>Is HUDSON whining again?
>
><\rhetorical question>

Uh oh!!

There's that pong again; come on lads whose farted!!

Phewww!! That's foul........

John HUDSON
September 14th 04, 07:36 PM
On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 13:16:31 -0400, Dally > wrote:

>John HUDSON wrote:
>
>> On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 12:41:35 -0400, Dally > wrote:
>>
>>
>>>John HUDSON wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>(More sarcasm Wendy) <more squirming with embarrassment>
>>>
>>>Okay, I'll bite. What are you blathering about now?
>>
>>
>> "Blathering"? mmmmm....
>>
>> It was nothing to do with you my sweetheart, read the attributions. I
>> drew it to your attention because some time ago you were having
>> problems with sarcasm.
>>
>> Read the attributions: I was taking the **** out of Lee for his
>> pathetic attempt at humour, after I earlier complained about the
>> decline of the former bitingly funny typical MFW humour.
>>
>> You snipped the relevant bits which read:
>>
>> Dally said:
>>
>>
>>>>We've got a mysterious sign up in our weight room that I've never
>>>>understood. I believe it says, "no tape on collars". I've always
>>>>wondered why they have that prominantly placed on all four walls. I've
>>>>never seen anyone ever use tape in the weight room and I don't even know
>>>>what they mean by collars in this case and why anyone would want to tape
>>>>them. Care to educate me?
>>>>
>>
>>
>> Lee said:
>>
>>
>>>Here is what you do Dally.
>>>
>>>Sneak in some duct tape. Tape a bunch of weights together.
>>>
>>>Then watch what happens.
>>
>>
>> John said:
>>
>> "This is the return to traditional MFW humour for which I was
>> yearning!!
>>
>> (More sarcasm Wendy) <more squirming with embarrassment>"
>>
>> Geddit?
>>
>> [sarcasm loses its pith when you have to explain it]
>
>Oh. Well, humor is pretty subjective, isn't it? As it happens, I had a
>pleasant moment imagining what the scene would look like if I duct-taped
>a few guys together. I also spared a moment to contemplate my attack
>method. I mean, how DO you get them to stand still? And what happens
>with the fact that they aren't actually WEARING collars in the weight
>room? I'd hate to go for their abdomens, since that's the largest part.
>
>Knees would be better, I think. They wouldn't spot me crawling towards
>them since they're gazing adoringly at their pecs and biceps and their
>knobby knees are the thinnest part - saves the most tape.
>
>Duct tape sure is useful, isn't it?
>
>Ah well, carry on, thanks for illuminating me on your sorrow over the
>lack of humor.

You're doing your part rectify that sorrow!! o)

John HUDSON
September 14th 04, 07:40 PM
On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 11:53:55 -0600, Lyle McDonald
> wrote:

>Lee Michaels wrote:
>
>> <rhetorical question>
>>
>> Is HUDSON whining again?
>>
>> <\rhetorical question>
>
>Would imply that he is ever NOT whining.
>Him and David both, just sit and whine, sit and whine.
>
>Yet they continue to read mfw regularly.

Uh oh!!

Someone's farted again, and this one's even worse than the last one.
What the **** are you chaps eating?!!

It's probably Lee and Lyle playing Dutch ovens!!

Dirty *******s... ugh!!

Open the ****ing windows lads and get the fresh air spray!!

bc
September 14th 04, 09:40 PM
Lyle McDonald > wrote in message >...
> bc wrote:
> > "Stop if you feel dizzy, faint, or short of breath." I'm trying to do
> > HIIT on the stairmaster and that's their warning? Not helpful at all.
> >
> > It'd be better if they said, "We're not responsible, but Go Till it
> > Hurts, Then Do More."
> >
> > Well, at least it gave me a chuckle anyway. I know it's there for CYA
> > legal reasons, but somewhere, someone will probably heed that advice
> > and fail to die, so I guess it's a good thing.
> >
> > - bc
>
> Yeah, I always giggle at those. their descriptoin of when to stop a
> workout is when I consider it to start having some utility in actually
> increasing my fitness.
>
> Of course, could be worse. The sign on the wall of my new gym says to
> stop training if you get 'nautious'.
>
> Lyle

I overheard a trainer tell her out of shape, 40-something client,
"It's important not to put too much effort into these lifts. Don't do
more than you can comfortably lift. We're not after major results
after all."

- bc

Keith Hobman
September 14th 04, 09:44 PM
In article >,
(bc) wrote:

> Lyle McDonald > wrote in message
>...
> > bc wrote:
> > > "Stop if you feel dizzy, faint, or short of breath." I'm trying to do
> > > HIIT on the stairmaster and that's their warning? Not helpful at all.
> > >
> > > It'd be better if they said, "We're not responsible, but Go Till it
> > > Hurts, Then Do More."
> > >
> > > Well, at least it gave me a chuckle anyway. I know it's there for CYA
> > > legal reasons, but somewhere, someone will probably heed that advice
> > > and fail to die, so I guess it's a good thing.
> > >
> > > - bc
> >
> > Yeah, I always giggle at those. their descriptoin of when to stop a
> > workout is when I consider it to start having some utility in actually
> > increasing my fitness.
> >
> > Of course, could be worse. The sign on the wall of my new gym says to
> > stop training if you get 'nautious'.
> >
> > Lyle
>
> I overheard a trainer tell her out of shape, 40-something client,
> "It's important not to put too much effort into these lifts. Don't do
> more than you can comfortably lift. We're not after major results
> after all."

Which really isn't bad advice for a 40 something out of shape person. Most
people try and do too much too soon.

--
My advice and opinions reflect my personality and goals.
I have no desire to cover my ass and all the bases with
disclaimers about who this is good for and who it is not
good for. So take everything I say with a grain of salt.

Dally
September 14th 04, 09:45 PM
bc wrote:

> Lyle McDonald > wrote in message >...
>
>>bc wrote:
>>
>>>"Stop if you feel dizzy, faint, or short of breath." I'm trying to do
>>>HIIT on the stairmaster and that's their warning? Not helpful at all.
>>>
>>>It'd be better if they said, "We're not responsible, but Go Till it
>>>Hurts, Then Do More."
>>>
>>>Well, at least it gave me a chuckle anyway. I know it's there for CYA
>>>legal reasons, but somewhere, someone will probably heed that advice
>>>and fail to die, so I guess it's a good thing.
>>>
>>>- bc
>>
>>Yeah, I always giggle at those. their descriptoin of when to stop a
>>workout is when I consider it to start having some utility in actually
>>increasing my fitness.
>>
>>Of course, could be worse. The sign on the wall of my new gym says to
>>stop training if you get 'nautious'.
>>
>>Lyle
>
>
> I overheard a trainer tell her out of shape, 40-something client,
> "It's important not to put too much effort into these lifts. Don't do
> more than you can comfortably lift. We're not after major results
> after all."
>
> - bc

Isn't it hard to keep your mouth shut when you hear things like that?
(Particularly if your jaw is on the ground.)

Just as an antidote to that awful trainer story, I was doing my nice
little sweat-free nautilus routine one day and a trainer came up to me
and said, "I notice you just did twelve perfect reps on every machine."
I said, "thank you". And she said, "that wasn't a compliment." The
resulting epiphany had a lot to do with me transitioning into the free
weight room. (I saw that trainer the other day - it's been two years
since that comment. I'm in better shape now than she is.)

Dally

Dally
September 14th 04, 09:47 PM
Keith Hobman wrote:

> In article >,
> (bc) wrote:

>>I overheard a trainer tell her out of shape, 40-something client,
>>"It's important not to put too much effort into these lifts. Don't do
>>more than you can comfortably lift. We're not after major results
>>after all."
>
> Which really isn't bad advice for a 40 something out of shape person. Most
> people try and do too much too soon.

But Keith, most people have no idea what a reasonable level of effort
is. A comment like that can doom a woman to a life-time of
pastel-colored dumbbells.

Dally

Keith Hobman
September 14th 04, 10:57 PM
In article >, Dally > wrote:

> Keith Hobman wrote:
>
> > In article >,
> > (bc) wrote:
>
> >>I overheard a trainer tell her out of shape, 40-something client,
> >>"It's important not to put too much effort into these lifts. Don't do
> >>more than you can comfortably lift. We're not after major results
> >>after all."
> >
> > Which really isn't bad advice for a 40 something out of shape person. Most
> > people try and do too much too soon.
>
> But Keith, most people have no idea what a reasonable level of effort
> is. A comment like that can doom a woman to a life-time of
> pastel-colored dumbbells.

But Dally, we weren't told what the person was doing when the comment was
made. If the person was making a reasonable level of effort than it is a
perfectly reasonable comment. Nor do we know it was a women. My point is
it can be a perfectly approriate comment from a trainer, depending on the
situation. During initial stages of adaptation there is no need to try and
set huge records. Making many small steps is perfectly reasonable.

No need to project your bias here.

--
My advice and opinions reflect my personality and goals.
I have no desire to cover my ass and all the bases with
disclaimers about who this is good for and who it is not
good for. So take everything I say with a grain of salt.

Lyle McDonald
September 14th 04, 11:11 PM
bc wrote:

> Lyle McDonald > wrote in message >...
>
>>bc wrote:
>>
>>>"Stop if you feel dizzy, faint, or short of breath." I'm trying to do
>>>HIIT on the stairmaster and that's their warning? Not helpful at all.
>>>
>>>It'd be better if they said, "We're not responsible, but Go Till it
>>>Hurts, Then Do More."
>>>
>>>Well, at least it gave me a chuckle anyway. I know it's there for CYA
>>>legal reasons, but somewhere, someone will probably heed that advice
>>>and fail to die, so I guess it's a good thing.
>>>
>>>- bc
>>
>>Yeah, I always giggle at those. their descriptoin of when to stop a
>>workout is when I consider it to start having some utility in actually
>>increasing my fitness.
>>
>>Of course, could be worse. The sign on the wall of my new gym says to
>>stop training if you get 'nautious'.
>>
>>Lyle
>
>
> I overheard a trainer tell her out of shape, 40-something client,
> "It's important not to put too much effort into these lifts. Don't do
> more than you can comfortably lift. We're not after major results
> after all."

gotta give him points for honesty, I suppose.

Lyle

DHW
September 15th 04, 02:29 AM
On 13 Sep 2004 13:23:25 -0700, (bc)
wrote:

>"Stop if you feel dizzy, faint, or short of breath." I'm trying to do
>HIIT on the stairmaster and that's their warning? Not helpful at all.
>
>It'd be better if they said, "We're not responsible, but Go Till it
>Hurts, Then Do More."
>
>Well, at least it gave me a chuckle anyway. I know it's there for CYA
>legal reasons, but somewhere, someone will probably heed that advice
>and fail to die, so I guess it's a good thing.
>
>- bc
Just today I noticed the warning on the preacher curl stand. There was
a blurb about keeping hair, jewelry and loose clothing away from
moving parts. A bit about keeping children away. And some other
things. (This is a stand ... not a machine ... there are no cables or
pully. The only moving parts are the lifter's arms.)

There was a separate sticker suggesting that failing to follow the
warnings could lead to serious injury or even death.

I couldn't help but wonder just how bad my form would have to be for
preacher curls to kill me.
D. Wells


Remove the numbers to mail me. Include the text "gore-in-2004"
(without quotation marks) to ensure you make it past the spam filter.

Lee Michaels
September 15th 04, 02:31 AM
"DHW" > wrote

> On 13 Sep 2004 13:23:25 -0700, (bc)
> wrote:
>
> >"Stop if you feel dizzy, faint, or short of breath." I'm trying to do
> >HIIT on the stairmaster and that's their warning? Not helpful at all.
> >
> >It'd be better if they said, "We're not responsible, but Go Till it
> >Hurts, Then Do More."
> >
> >Well, at least it gave me a chuckle anyway. I know it's there for CYA
> >legal reasons, but somewhere, someone will probably heed that advice
> >and fail to die, so I guess it's a good thing.
> >
> >- bc
> Just today I noticed the warning on the preacher curl stand. There was
> a blurb about keeping hair, jewelry and loose clothing away from
> moving parts. A bit about keeping children away. And some other
> things. (This is a stand ... not a machine ... there are no cables or
> pully. The only moving parts are the lifter's arms.)
>
> There was a separate sticker suggesting that failing to follow the
> warnings could lead to serious injury or even death.
>
> I couldn't help but wonder just how bad my form would have to be for
> preacher curls to kill me.
> D. Wells

Actually, the form that is used on these preacher benches and curls in
general could develop a nasty case of tendonitis.

But that is rarely fatal.

Art S
September 15th 04, 05:23 AM
"Dally" > wrote in message ...
> bc wrote:
> Just as an antidote to that awful trainer story, I was doing my nice
> little sweat-free nautilus routine one day and a trainer came up to me
> and said, "I notice you just did twelve perfect reps on every machine."
> I said, "thank you". And she said, "that wasn't a compliment." The
> resulting epiphany had a lot to do with me transitioning into the free
> weight room. (I saw that trainer the other day - it's been two years
> since that comment. I'm in better shape now than she is.)

?

Would you please explain that? It went right over my head.

Thanks,

Art

David
September 15th 04, 11:30 AM
"Lyle McDonald" > wrote in message
...
> Lee Michaels wrote:
>
> > <rhetorical question>
> >
> > Is HUDSON whining again?
> >
> > <\rhetorical question>
>
> Would imply that he is ever NOT whining.
> Him and David both, just sit and whine, sit and whine.

It's "He and David" - dip****

David
September 15th 04, 12:22 PM
"Dally" > wrote in message
...
> bc wrote:
>
> > Lyle McDonald > wrote in message
>...
> >
> >>bc wrote:
> >>
> >>>"Stop if you feel dizzy, faint, or short of breath." I'm trying to do
> >>>HIIT on the stairmaster and that's their warning? Not helpful at all.
> >>>
> >>>It'd be better if they said, "We're not responsible, but Go Till it
> >>>Hurts, Then Do More."
> >>>
> >>>Well, at least it gave me a chuckle anyway. I know it's there for CYA
> >>>legal reasons, but somewhere, someone will probably heed that advice
> >>>and fail to die, so I guess it's a good thing.
> >>>
> >>>- bc
> >>
> >>Yeah, I always giggle at those. their descriptoin of when to stop a
> >>workout is when I consider it to start having some utility in actually
> >>increasing my fitness.
> >>
> >>Of course, could be worse. The sign on the wall of my new gym says to
> >>stop training if you get 'nautious'.
> >>
> >>Lyle
> >
> >
> > I overheard a trainer tell her out of shape, 40-something client,
> > "It's important not to put too much effort into these lifts. Don't do
> > more than you can comfortably lift. We're not after major results
> > after all."
> >
> > - bc
>
> Isn't it hard to keep your mouth shut when you hear things like that?
> (Particularly if your jaw is on the ground.)
>
> Just as an antidote to that awful trainer story, I was doing my nice
> little sweat-free nautilus routine one day and a trainer came up to me
> and said, "I notice you just did twelve perfect reps on every machine."
> I said, "thank you". And she said, "that wasn't a compliment." The
> resulting epiphany had a lot to do with me transitioning into the free
> weight room. (I saw that trainer the other day - it's been two years
> since that comment. I'm in better shape now than she is.)
>
> Dally

Dally, was that the epiphany that changed your life?

John HUDSON
September 15th 04, 01:08 PM
On Wed, 15 Sep 2004 20:30:47 +1000, "David" >
wrote:

>
>"Lyle McDonald" > wrote in message
...
>> Lee Michaels wrote:
>>
>> > <rhetorical question>
>> >
>> > Is HUDSON whining again?
>> >
>> > <\rhetorical question>
>>
>> Would imply that he is ever NOT whining.
>> Him and David both, just sit and whine, sit and whine.
>
> It's "He and David" - dip****

Wasn't it Susie who sits and whines in the shoeshine shop, or was it
sits and shines in the shoeshine shop?

Perhaps she sits and shines and ****s and whines in the shoeshine
shop, so that:

Susie, Susie, ****ting in the shoeshine shop,
****ting in the shoeshine shop,
****ting in the shoeshine shop,
Susie, Susie, ****ting in the shoeshine shop,
She ****s and shines, and whines and ****s,
She ****s and shines, and whines and ****s,
Susie, Susie, ****ting in the shoeshine shop,
She ****s and ****s and whines all day!

I'm sure that will amuse the two farts Lyle and Lee, and will really
entertain the three stooges (of whom Lee is also a member), while the
hyenas will be hysterical!! ;o)

Dally
September 15th 04, 02:10 PM
David wrote:

> "Dally" > wrote in message
> ...

>>Just as an antidote to that awful trainer story, I was doing my nice
>>little sweat-free nautilus routine one day and a trainer came up to me
>>and said, "I notice you just did twelve perfect reps on every machine."
>> I said, "thank you". And she said, "that wasn't a compliment." The
>>resulting epiphany had a lot to do with me transitioning into the free
>>weight room. (I saw that trainer the other day - it's been two years
>>since that comment. I'm in better shape now than she is.)
>>
>>Dally
>
>
> Dally, was that the epiphany that changed your life?

No, David. It took a whole bunch ganging up on me. And I didn't change
my life all in one fell swoop, I've been doing it in bits and pieces.

One was when I walked into the gym in May, 2002 and said, "I want to
cancel my membership 'cuz I never have time to get here." The desk
clerk said, "Are you sure? It doesn't seem to be doing you much good to
stay away." I was at my all-time highest weight. It occurred to me
that she was telling me that lack of exercise was making me fat. A
lightbulb moment.

I went to the doctor's office with my nine year old son and said, "I'm
concerned because he's developed an abdominal paunch - should a nine
year old be getting visceral fat stores like this?" And the doctor
said, "Oh, he's normal, all the kids have this now." I was stunned by
his assessment (which I still think was a cop-out) and in thinking about
this I took a good hard look at why my son was getting fat. I looked
around and saw that ALL the fat kids had fat parents and ALL the slender
kids had slender parents. I concluded that he was getting fat because
of our lifestyle. I decided to change it.

The lightbulb moment with the nautilus machines had to do with the
concept of working out at sub-maximal levels. If you can do twelve
perfect reps with no sweat then you aren't lifting heavy enough. If I
rushed I could strap myself into the nautilus machines and do a full
circuit in about 25 minutes without even thinking about it. I doubt it
did much more for me than putting myself in a vibrating belt for 25
minutes. Moving into the free weight room required that I concentrate
on what I was doing, push my muscles in new directions, and, most of
all, work out at a sweat. The intensity level went sky-rocketing up.
And the fat started to fall off me in sheets.

These were moments in the "Exercise more" continuum.

There were also a series of epiphanies in the "eat less" continuum.

And I continue to have epiphanies in the "repeat, forever" continuum.

Each person will find their own motivation. Epiphanies don't export
well. And they're so intensely personal that I don't really care to
share all that many of them.

Dally

Dally
September 15th 04, 02:11 PM
Keith Hobman wrote:

> In article >, Dally > wrote:
>
>
>>Keith Hobman wrote:
>>
>>
>>>In article >,
(bc) wrote:
>>
>>>>I overheard a trainer tell her out of shape, 40-something client,
>>>>"It's important not to put too much effort into these lifts. Don't do
>>>>more than you can comfortably lift. We're not after major results
>>>>after all."
>>>
>>>Which really isn't bad advice for a 40 something out of shape person. Most
>>>people try and do too much too soon.
>>
>>But Keith, most people have no idea what a reasonable level of effort
>>is. A comment like that can doom a woman to a life-time of
>>pastel-colored dumbbells.
>
>
> But Dally, we weren't told what the person was doing when the comment was
> made. If the person was making a reasonable level of effort than it is a
> perfectly reasonable comment. Nor do we know it was a women. My point is
> it can be a perfectly approriate comment from a trainer, depending on the
> situation. During initial stages of adaptation there is no need to try and
> set huge records. Making many small steps is perfectly reasonable.

You're right, of course. Depending on the situation.

> No need to project your bias here.

LOL, I assure you, I *do* need to project my own bias. I'm rotten at
projecting other people's biases.

Dally

Jeff Finlayson
September 15th 04, 02:40 PM
bc wrote:
> Lyle McDonald wrote:
>> bc wrote:
>>
>>>"Stop if you feel dizzy, faint, or short of breath." I'm trying to do
>>>HIIT on the stairmaster and that's their warning? Not helpful at all.
>>>
>>>It'd be better if they said, "We're not responsible, but Go Till it
>>>Hurts, Then Do More."
>>>
>>>Well, at least it gave me a chuckle anyway. I know it's there for CYA
>>>legal reasons, but somewhere, someone will probably heed that advice
>>>and fail to die, so I guess it's a good thing.
>>>- bc
>>
>>Yeah, I always giggle at those. their descriptoin of when to stop a
>>workout is when I consider it to start having some utility in actually
>>increasing my fitness.
>>
>>Of course, could be worse. The sign on the wall of my new gym says to
>>stop training if you get 'nautious'.
>>Lyle
>
> I overheard a trainer tell her out of shape, 40-something client,
> "It's important not to put too much effort into these lifts. Don't do
> more than you can comfortably lift. We're not after major results
> after all."
> - bc

I agree with Keith about that being a 'don't do too much too soon' thing.
But it could be worded better. 'We're not after major results right now'
or We're not after major results at this stage.' would be better. JMO.

bc
September 15th 04, 03:40 PM
"Lee Michaels" > wrote in message news:<[email protected]_s53>...
> "DHW" > wrote
>
> > On 13 Sep 2004 13:23:25 -0700, (bc)
> > wrote:
> >
> > >"Stop if you feel dizzy, faint, or short of breath." I'm trying to do
> > >HIIT on the stairmaster and that's their warning? Not helpful at all.
> > >
> > >It'd be better if they said, "We're not responsible, but Go Till it
> > >Hurts, Then Do More."
> > >
> > >Well, at least it gave me a chuckle anyway. I know it's there for CYA
> > >legal reasons, but somewhere, someone will probably heed that advice
> > >and fail to die, so I guess it's a good thing.
> > >
> > >- bc
> > Just today I noticed the warning on the preacher curl stand. There was
> > a blurb about keeping hair, jewelry and loose clothing away from
> > moving parts. A bit about keeping children away. And some other
> > things. (This is a stand ... not a machine ... there are no cables or
> > pully. The only moving parts are the lifter's arms.)
> >
> > There was a separate sticker suggesting that failing to follow the
> > warnings could lead to serious injury or even death.
> >
> > I couldn't help but wonder just how bad my form would have to be for
> > preacher curls to kill me.
> > D. Wells
>
> Actually, the form that is used on these preacher benches and curls in
> general could develop a nasty case of tendonitis.
>
> But that is rarely fatal.


But, when you rip both forearms off when your spotter gets distracted
and drops the bar on that last assisted negative rep, you bleed out
from the elbows. It's not pretty.

- bc

bc
September 15th 04, 04:06 PM
(Keith Hobman) wrote in message >...
> In article >, Dally > wrote:
>
> > Keith Hobman wrote:
> >
> > > In article >,
> > > (bc) wrote:
>
> > >>I overheard a trainer tell her out of shape, 40-something client,
> > >>"It's important not to put too much effort into these lifts. Don't do
> > >>more than you can comfortably lift. We're not after major results
> > >>after all."
> > >
> > > Which really isn't bad advice for a 40 something out of shape person. Most
> > > people try and do too much too soon.
> >
> > But Keith, most people have no idea what a reasonable level of effort
> > is. A comment like that can doom a woman to a life-time of
> > pastel-colored dumbbells.
>
> But Dally, we weren't told what the person was doing when the comment was
> made. If the person was making a reasonable level of effort than it is a
> perfectly reasonable comment. Nor do we know it was a women. My point is
> it can be a perfectly approriate comment from a trainer, depending on the
> situation. During initial stages of adaptation there is no need to try and
> set huge records. Making many small steps is perfectly reasonable.
>
> No need to project your bias here.

I should have provided context, the woman was part of a small lifting
group, sort of a "women on weights (wow)" thing, mostly composed of
younger women. I was mostly amused at the "We're not after major
results after all." I was tempted to interject, "Try Golf."

- bc

Dally
September 15th 04, 04:15 PM
bc wrote:

> "Lee Michaels" > wrote in message news:<[email protected]_s53>...

>>Actually, the form that is used on these preacher benches and curls in
>>general could develop a nasty case of tendonitis.
>>
>>But that is rarely fatal.
>
> But, when you rip both forearms off when your spotter gets distracted
> and drops the bar on that last assisted negative rep, you bleed out
> from the elbows. It's not pretty.
>
> - bc

Yeah, I hate it when that happens.

Dally

John HUDSON
September 15th 04, 04:36 PM
On Wed, 15 Sep 2004 11:15:16 -0400, Dally > wrote:

>bc wrote:
>
>> "Lee Michaels" > wrote in message news:<[email protected]_s53>...
>
>>>Actually, the form that is used on these preacher benches and curls in
>>>general could develop a nasty case of tendonitis.
>>>
>>>But that is rarely fatal.
>>
>> But, when you rip both forearms off when your spotter gets distracted
>> and drops the bar on that last assisted negative rep, you bleed out
>> from the elbows. It's not pretty.
>>
>> - bc
>
>Yeah, I hate it when that happens.

It stumps most people!! ;o)

David
September 15th 04, 05:21 PM
"Dally" > wrote in message
...
> David wrote:
>
> > "Dally" > wrote in message
> > ...
>
> >>Just as an antidote to that awful trainer story, I was doing my nice
> >>little sweat-free nautilus routine one day and a trainer came up to me
> >>and said, "I notice you just did twelve perfect reps on every machine."
> >> I said, "thank you". And she said, "that wasn't a compliment." The
> >>resulting epiphany had a lot to do with me transitioning into the free
> >>weight room. (I saw that trainer the other day - it's been two years
> >>since that comment. I'm in better shape now than she is.)
> >>
> >>Dally
> >
> >
> > Dally, was that the epiphany that changed your life?
>
> No, David. It took a whole bunch ganging up on me. And I didn't change
> my life all in one fell swoop, I've been doing it in bits and pieces.
>
> One was when I walked into the gym in May, 2002 and said, "I want to
> cancel my membership 'cuz I never have time to get here." The desk
> clerk said, "Are you sure? It doesn't seem to be doing you much good to
> stay away." I was at my all-time highest weight. It occurred to me
> that she was telling me that lack of exercise was making me fat. A
> lightbulb moment.
>
> I went to the doctor's office with my nine year old son and said, "I'm
> concerned because he's developed an abdominal paunch - should a nine
> year old be getting visceral fat stores like this?" And the doctor
> said, "Oh, he's normal, all the kids have this now." I was stunned by
> his assessment (which I still think was a cop-out) and in thinking about
> this I took a good hard look at why my son was getting fat. I looked
> around and saw that ALL the fat kids had fat parents and ALL the slender
> kids had slender parents. I concluded that he was getting fat because
> of our lifestyle. I decided to change it.
>
> The lightbulb moment with the nautilus machines had to do with the
> concept of working out at sub-maximal levels. If you can do twelve
> perfect reps with no sweat then you aren't lifting heavy enough. If I
> rushed I could strap myself into the nautilus machines and do a full
> circuit in about 25 minutes without even thinking about it. I doubt it
> did much more for me than putting myself in a vibrating belt for 25
> minutes. Moving into the free weight room required that I concentrate
> on what I was doing, push my muscles in new directions, and, most of
> all, work out at a sweat. The intensity level went sky-rocketing up.
> And the fat started to fall off me in sheets.
>
> These were moments in the "Exercise more" continuum.
>
> There were also a series of epiphanies in the "eat less" continuum.
>
> And I continue to have epiphanies in the "repeat, forever" continuum.
>
> Each person will find their own motivation. Epiphanies don't export
> well. And they're so intensely personal that I don't really care to
> share all that many of them.
>
> Dally

Thanks for sharing that Dally, Your epiphanies exported very well. I s'pose
you have to be "ready". :Like being 'born again'. I see you point about
the Nautilus machines - however just loading them more would have solved the
perfect sets thing, no?
>

David
September 15th 04, 06:00 PM
"John HUDSON" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 15 Sep 2004 20:30:47 +1000, "David" >
> wrote:
>
> >
> >"Lyle McDonald" > wrote in message
> ...
> >> Lee Michaels wrote:
> >>
> >> > <rhetorical question>
> >> >
> >> > Is HUDSON whining again?
> >> >
> >> > <\rhetorical question>
> >>
> >> Would imply that he is ever NOT whining.
> >> Him and David both, just sit and whine, sit and whine.
> >
> > It's "He and David" - dip****
>
> Wasn't it Susie who sits and whines in the shoeshine shop, or was it
> sits and shines in the shoeshine shop?
>
> Perhaps she sits and shines and ****s and whines in the shoeshine
> shop, so that:
>
> Susie, Susie, ****ting in the shoeshine shop,
> ****ting in the shoeshine shop,
> ****ting in the shoeshine shop,
> Susie, Susie, ****ting in the shoeshine shop,
> She ****s and shines, and whines and ****s,
> She ****s and shines, and whines and ****s,
> Susie, Susie, ****ting in the shoeshine shop,
> She ****s and ****s and whines all day!
>
> I'm sure that will amuse the two farts Lyle and Lee, and will really
> entertain the three stooges (of whom Lee is also a member), while the
> hyenas will be hysterical!! ;o)

I'm sure they would find it funny but the Susie poem will be far too deep
for most of them

bc
September 15th 04, 10:47 PM
Dally > wrote in message >...

>
> >>Just as an antidote to that awful trainer story, I was doing my nice
> >>little sweat-free nautilus routine one day and a trainer came up to me
> >>and said, "I notice you just did twelve perfect reps on every machine."
> >> I said, "thank you". And she said, "that wasn't a compliment."

Good one.

> One was when I walked into the gym in May, 2002 and said, "I want to
> cancel my membership 'cuz I never have time to get here." The desk
> clerk said, "Are you sure? It doesn't seem to be doing you much good to
> stay away." I was at my all-time highest weight.

Ow!

You must be some kind of magnet for brutal honesty.

Well, do unto others ...

- bc

Anna Martelli Ravenscroft
September 16th 04, 12:12 PM
On Wed, 15 Sep 2004 09:10:23 -0400, Dally wrote:

> David wrote:
>
>> "Dally" > wrote in message
>> ...
>
>>>Just as an antidote to that awful trainer story, I was doing my nice
>>>little sweat-free nautilus routine one day and a trainer came up to me
>>>and said, "I notice you just did twelve perfect reps on every machine."
>>> I said, "thank you". And she said, "that wasn't a compliment." The
>>>resulting epiphany had a lot to do with me transitioning into the free
>>>weight room. (I saw that trainer the other day - it's been two years
>>>since that comment. I'm in better shape now than she is.)
>>>
>>>Dally
>>
>>
>> Dally, was that the epiphany that changed your life?
>
> No, David. It took a whole bunch ganging up on me. And I didn't change
> my life all in one fell swoop, I've been doing it in bits and pieces.
>
> One was when I walked into the gym in May, 2002 and said, "I want to
> cancel my membership 'cuz I never have time to get here." The desk
> clerk said, "Are you sure? It doesn't seem to be doing you much good to
> stay away." I was at my all-time highest weight. It occurred to me
> that she was telling me that lack of exercise was making me fat. A
> lightbulb moment.
>
> I went to the doctor's office with my nine year old son and said, "I'm
> concerned because he's developed an abdominal paunch - should a nine
> year old be getting visceral fat stores like this?" And the doctor
> said, "Oh, he's normal, all the kids have this now." I was stunned by
> his assessment (which I still think was a cop-out) and in thinking about
> this I took a good hard look at why my son was getting fat. I looked
> around and saw that ALL the fat kids had fat parents and ALL the slender
> kids had slender parents. I concluded that he was getting fat because
> of our lifestyle. I decided to change it.
>
> The lightbulb moment with the nautilus machines had to do with the
> concept of working out at sub-maximal levels. If you can do twelve
> perfect reps with no sweat then you aren't lifting heavy enough. If I
> rushed I could strap myself into the nautilus machines and do a full
> circuit in about 25 minutes without even thinking about it. I doubt it
> did much more for me than putting myself in a vibrating belt for 25
> minutes. Moving into the free weight room required that I concentrate
> on what I was doing, push my muscles in new directions, and, most of
> all, work out at a sweat. The intensity level went sky-rocketing up.
> And the fat started to fall off me in sheets.
>
> These were moments in the "Exercise more" continuum.
>
> There were also a series of epiphanies in the "eat less" continuum.
>
> And I continue to have epiphanies in the "repeat, forever" continuum.
>
> Each person will find their own motivation. Epiphanies don't export
> well. And they're so intensely personal that I don't really care to
> share all that many of them.

Thank you for sharing these. My personal epiphany was when I went to buy
jeans and they were the same size I remember my mother buying when I was a
kid and she was complaining about being fat. And then I weighed myself and
realized I was heavier than I'd been when 9 months pregnant with my
second. Then my asthma kicked up. I felt old and fat and worthless.

I started on the eating and working out right then... I didn't have the
slightest idea HOW but I was damn sure gonna try. That was back in, hrmmm,
99 I believe. I couldn't finish the 5 minute warmup on the beginner step
aerobics tape. It took a long time to finally decide to measure my portion
sizes - and realize that my "firsts only" were huge (4 or 5 servings of
several foods) and no wonder I wasn't losing weight... But, slowly, over
about a year, I started losing and building up the habits I needed - and
then I started kicking it and lost the rest, and then started working on
being FIT, not just on losing weight...

I understand the "repeat, forever" bit - I remember being terrified in
the beginning months by the thought that "I'll have to live like this
forever - I'll never be able to eat like a normal person, and I'll have to
do this awful exercise and I hate it!" For me, grasping the idea of
changing eating HABITS and exercise HABITS was what finally worked,
slowly. I lost the pounds and am healthier now than I was in my skinny
twenties. And I fell in love with weightlifting. I look forward to my
lifting these days, and learning to cook different foods so I can enjoy
what I'm eating is fun.

Thanks for sharing some of your history. I admire you!

Anna

David
September 16th 04, 01:24 PM
"Anna Martelli Ravenscroft" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 15 Sep 2004 09:10:23 -0400, Dally wrote:
>
> > David wrote:
> >
> >> "Dally" > wrote in message
> >> ...
> >
> >>>Just as an antidote to that awful trainer story, I was doing my nice
> >>>little sweat-free nautilus routine one day and a trainer came up to me
> >>>and said, "I notice you just did twelve perfect reps on every machine."
> >>> I said, "thank you". And she said, "that wasn't a compliment." The
> >>>resulting epiphany had a lot to do with me transitioning into the free
> >>>weight room. (I saw that trainer the other day - it's been two years
> >>>since that comment. I'm in better shape now than she is.)
> >>>
> >>>Dally
> >>
> >>
> >> Dally, was that the epiphany that changed your life?
> >
> > No, David. It took a whole bunch ganging up on me. And I didn't change
> > my life all in one fell swoop, I've been doing it in bits and pieces.
> >
> > One was when I walked into the gym in May, 2002 and said, "I want to
> > cancel my membership 'cuz I never have time to get here." The desk
> > clerk said, "Are you sure? It doesn't seem to be doing you much good to
> > stay away." I was at my all-time highest weight. It occurred to me
> > that she was telling me that lack of exercise was making me fat. A
> > lightbulb moment.
> >
> > I went to the doctor's office with my nine year old son and said, "I'm
> > concerned because he's developed an abdominal paunch - should a nine
> > year old be getting visceral fat stores like this?" And the doctor
> > said, "Oh, he's normal, all the kids have this now." I was stunned by
> > his assessment (which I still think was a cop-out) and in thinking about
> > this I took a good hard look at why my son was getting fat. I looked
> > around and saw that ALL the fat kids had fat parents and ALL the slender
> > kids had slender parents. I concluded that he was getting fat because
> > of our lifestyle. I decided to change it.
> >
> > The lightbulb moment with the nautilus machines had to do with the
> > concept of working out at sub-maximal levels. If you can do twelve
> > perfect reps with no sweat then you aren't lifting heavy enough. If I
> > rushed I could strap myself into the nautilus machines and do a full
> > circuit in about 25 minutes without even thinking about it. I doubt it
> > did much more for me than putting myself in a vibrating belt for 25
> > minutes. Moving into the free weight room required that I concentrate
> > on what I was doing, push my muscles in new directions, and, most of
> > all, work out at a sweat. The intensity level went sky-rocketing up.
> > And the fat started to fall off me in sheets.
> >
> > These were moments in the "Exercise more" continuum.
> >
> > There were also a series of epiphanies in the "eat less" continuum.
> >
> > And I continue to have epiphanies in the "repeat, forever" continuum.
> >
> > Each person will find their own motivation. Epiphanies don't export
> > well. And they're so intensely personal that I don't really care to
> > share all that many of them.
>
> Thank you for sharing these. My personal epiphany was when I went to buy
> jeans and they were the same size I remember my mother buying when I was a
> kid and she was complaining about being fat. And then I weighed myself and
> realized I was heavier than I'd been when 9 months pregnant with my
> second. Then my asthma kicked up. I felt old and fat and worthless.
>
> I started on the eating and working out right then... I didn't have the
> slightest idea HOW but I was damn sure gonna try. That was back in, hrmmm,
> 99 I believe. I couldn't finish the 5 minute warmup on the beginner step
> aerobics tape. It took a long time to finally decide to measure my portion
> sizes - and realize that my "firsts only" were huge (4 or 5 servings of
> several foods) and no wonder I wasn't losing weight... But, slowly, over
> about a year, I started losing and building up the habits I needed - and
> then I started kicking it and lost the rest, and then started working on
> being FIT, not just on losing weight...
>
> I understand the "repeat, forever" bit - I remember being terrified in
> the beginning months by the thought that "I'll have to live like this
> forever - I'll never be able to eat like a normal person, and I'll have to
> do this awful exercise and I hate it!" For me, grasping the idea of
> changing eating HABITS and exercise HABITS was what finally worked,
> slowly. I lost the pounds and am healthier now than I was in my skinny
> twenties. And I fell in love with weightlifting. I look forward to my
> lifting these days, and learning to cook different foods so I can enjoy
> what I'm eating is fun.
>
> Thanks for sharing some of your history. I admire you!
>
> Anna

I'd like to share my epiphany with the group. It happened one day when I was
in a store that sold scales - I stood on one, not realizing that it was one
of those 'talking' scales - to my utter embarassment and in front of the
other customers it said "one at a time, please" . It was then that I decided
that 630 lbs was far too heavy and tht I had better trim down

Joe Laughlin
September 16th 04, 07:34 PM
Dally wrote:
>
> I went to the doctor's office with my nine year old son
> and said, "I'm concerned because he's developed an
> abdominal paunch - should a nine year old be getting
> visceral fat stores like this?" And the doctor said,
> "Oh, he's normal, all the kids have this now." I was
> stunned by his assessment (which I still think was a
> cop-out) and in thinking about this I took a good hard
> look at why my son was getting fat. I looked around and
> saw that ALL the fat kids had fat parents and ALL the
> slender kids had slender parents. I concluded that he
> was getting fat because of our lifestyle. I decided to
> change it.
>

And all the smart kids have smart biological parents. And all the dumb kids
have dumb biological parents. And all the tall kids have tall biological
parents. And all the short kids have short biological parents. And all the
talkative kids have talkative biological parents. And all the blonde kids
have blonde biological parents. And all the blue eyed kids have blue eyed
biological parents.

Amazing, isn't it?

Dally
September 16th 04, 09:07 PM
Joe Laughlin wrote:

> Dally wrote:
>
>>I went to the doctor's office with my nine year old son
>>and said, "I'm concerned because he's developed an
>>abdominal paunch - should a nine year old be getting
>>visceral fat stores like this?" And the doctor said,
>>"Oh, he's normal, all the kids have this now." I was
>>stunned by his assessment (which I still think was a
>>cop-out) and in thinking about this I took a good hard
>>look at why my son was getting fat. I looked around and
>>saw that ALL the fat kids had fat parents and ALL the
>>slender kids had slender parents. I concluded that he
>>was getting fat because of our lifestyle. I decided to
>>change it.
>>
>
>
> And all the smart kids have smart biological parents. And all the dumb kids
> have dumb biological parents. And all the tall kids have tall biological
> parents. And all the short kids have short biological parents. And all the
> talkative kids have talkative biological parents. And all the blonde kids
> have blonde biological parents. And all the blue eyed kids have blue eyed
> biological parents.
>
> Amazing, isn't it?

Yup. Used to be my chubby kid had chubby parents. Now I've got three
slender kids and two slender parents. Amazing what genetics will do for
you. When you stop being ****tarded.

Dally

Hugh Beyer
September 16th 04, 09:46 PM
"Joe Laughlin" > wrote in
:

> Dally wrote:
>>
>> I went to the doctor's office with my nine year old son
>> and said, "I'm concerned because he's developed an
>> abdominal paunch - should a nine year old be getting
>> visceral fat stores like this?" And the doctor said,
>> "Oh, he's normal, all the kids have this now." I was
>> stunned by his assessment (which I still think was a
>> cop-out) and in thinking about this I took a good hard
>> look at why my son was getting fat. I looked around and
>> saw that ALL the fat kids had fat parents and ALL the
>> slender kids had slender parents. I concluded that he
>> was getting fat because of our lifestyle. I decided to
>> change it.
>>
>
> And all the smart kids have smart biological parents. And all the dumb
> kids have dumb biological parents. And all the tall kids have tall
> biological parents. And all the short kids have short biological
> parents. And all the talkative kids have talkative biological parents.
> And all the blonde kids have blonde biological parents. And all the
> blue eyed kids have blue eyed biological parents.
>
> Amazing, isn't it?
>
>

I'm pretty sure this is the stupidest post I've read in a while, but I can't
decide which dimension of stupidity it's displaying.

Wanna try again?

Hugh


--
One puppy had its dewclaws removed in the creation of this post, but for
reasons of hygene and it really doesn't hurt them at all.

Joe Laughlin
September 16th 04, 10:46 PM
Hugh Beyer wrote:
> "Joe Laughlin" > wrote in
> :
>
>> Dally wrote:
>>>
>>> I went to the doctor's office with my nine year old son
>>> and said, "I'm concerned because he's developed an
>>> abdominal paunch - should a nine year old be getting
>>> visceral fat stores like this?" And the doctor said,
>>> "Oh, he's normal, all the kids have this now." I was
>>> stunned by his assessment (which I still think was a
>>> cop-out) and in thinking about this I took a good hard
>>> look at why my son was getting fat. I looked around and
>>> saw that ALL the fat kids had fat parents and ALL the
>>> slender kids had slender parents. I concluded that he
>>> was getting fat because of our lifestyle. I decided to
>>> change it.
>>>
>>
>> And all the smart kids have smart biological parents.
>> And all the dumb kids have dumb biological parents. And
>> all the tall kids have tall biological parents. And all
>> the short kids have short biological parents. And all
>> the talkative kids have talkative biological parents.
>> And all the blonde kids have blonde biological parents.
>> And all the blue eyed kids have blue eyed biological
>> parents.
>>
>> Amazing, isn't it?
>>
>>
>
> I'm pretty sure this is the stupidest post I've read in a
> while, but I can't decide which dimension of stupidity
> it's displaying.
>
> Wanna try again?
>
> Hugh


I'm not sure what you're asking for.

Dally
September 17th 04, 12:26 AM
Joe Laughlin wrote:
> Hugh Beyer wrote:
>
>>"Joe Laughlin" > wrote in
:
>>
>>
>>>Dally wrote:
>>>
>>>>I went to the doctor's office with my nine year old son
>>>>and said, "I'm concerned because he's developed an
>>>>abdominal paunch - should a nine year old be getting
>>>>visceral fat stores like this?" And the doctor said,
>>>>"Oh, he's normal, all the kids have this now." I was
>>>>stunned by his assessment (which I still think was a
>>>>cop-out) and in thinking about this I took a good hard
>>>>look at why my son was getting fat. I looked around and
>>>>saw that ALL the fat kids had fat parents and ALL the
>>>>slender kids had slender parents. I concluded that he
>>>>was getting fat because of our lifestyle. I decided to
>>>>change it.
>>>>
>>>
>>>And all the smart kids have smart biological parents.
>>>And all the dumb kids have dumb biological parents. And
>>>all the tall kids have tall biological parents. And all
>>>the short kids have short biological parents. And all
>>>the talkative kids have talkative biological parents.
>>>And all the blonde kids have blonde biological parents.
>>>And all the blue eyed kids have blue eyed biological
>>>parents.
>>>
>>>Amazing, isn't it?
>>>
>>>
>>
>>I'm pretty sure this is the stupidest post I've read in a
>>while, but I can't decide which dimension of stupidity
>>it's displaying.
>>
>>Wanna try again?
>>
>> Hugh
>
>
>
> I'm not sure what you're asking for.

He's trying to figure out whether you really think kids become chubby at
the age of nine because of genetics.

Dally

Hugh Beyer
September 17th 04, 12:43 AM
Dally > wrote in :

> Joe Laughlin wrote:
>> Hugh Beyer wrote:
>>
>>>"Joe Laughlin" > wrote in
:
>>>
>>>
>>>>Dally wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>I went to the doctor's office with my nine year old son
>>>>>and said, "I'm concerned because he's developed an
>>>>>abdominal paunch - should a nine year old be getting
>>>>>visceral fat stores like this?" And the doctor said,
>>>>>"Oh, he's normal, all the kids have this now." I was
>>>>>stunned by his assessment (which I still think was a
>>>>>cop-out) and in thinking about this I took a good hard
>>>>>look at why my son was getting fat. I looked around and
>>>>>saw that ALL the fat kids had fat parents and ALL the
>>>>>slender kids had slender parents. I concluded that he
>>>>>was getting fat because of our lifestyle. I decided to
>>>>>change it.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>And all the smart kids have smart biological parents.
>>>>And all the dumb kids have dumb biological parents. And
>>>>all the tall kids have tall biological parents. And all
>>>>the short kids have short biological parents. And all
>>>>the talkative kids have talkative biological parents.
>>>>And all the blonde kids have blonde biological parents.
>>>>And all the blue eyed kids have blue eyed biological
>>>>parents.
>>>>
>>>>Amazing, isn't it?
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>I'm pretty sure this is the stupidest post I've read in a
>>>while, but I can't decide which dimension of stupidity
>>>it's displaying.
>>>
>>>Wanna try again?
>>>
>>> Hugh
>>
>>
>>
>> I'm not sure what you're asking for.
>
> He's trying to figure out whether you really think kids become chubby at
> the age of nine because of genetics.

But since he's listed a bunch of counter-examples, maybe he thinks YOU
think it's really genetics. Or maybe he's totally missed the point that
there are other ways to pass traits on to your kids.

Hugh


--
One puppy had its dewclaws removed in the creation of this post, but for
reasons of hygene and it really doesn't hurt them at all.

Joe Laughlin
September 17th 04, 01:35 AM
Hugh Beyer wrote:
> Dally > wrote in
> :
>
>> Joe Laughlin wrote:
>>> Hugh Beyer wrote:
>>>
>>>> "Joe Laughlin" > wrote in
>>>> :
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> Dally wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> I went to the doctor's office with my nine year old
>>>>>> son and said, "I'm concerned because he's developed
>>>>>> an abdominal paunch - should a nine year old be
>>>>>> getting visceral fat stores like this?" And the
>>>>>> doctor said, "Oh, he's normal, all the kids have
>>>>>> this now." I was stunned by his assessment (which I
>>>>>> still think was a cop-out) and in thinking about
>>>>>> this I took a good hard look at why my son was
>>>>>> getting fat. I looked around and saw that ALL the
>>>>>> fat kids had fat parents and ALL the slender kids
>>>>>> had slender parents. I concluded that he was
>>>>>> getting fat because of our lifestyle. I decided to
>>>>>> change it.
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> And all the smart kids have smart biological parents.
>>>>> And all the dumb kids have dumb biological parents.
>>>>> And all the tall kids have tall biological parents.
>>>>> And all the short kids have short biological parents.
>>>>> And all the talkative kids have talkative biological
>>>>> parents. And all the blonde kids have blonde
>>>>> biological parents. And all the blue eyed kids have
>>>>> blue eyed biological parents.
>>>>>
>>>>> Amazing, isn't it?
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> I'm pretty sure this is the stupidest post I've read
>>>> in a while, but I can't decide which dimension of
>>>> stupidity it's displaying.
>>>>
>>>> Wanna try again?
>>>>
>>>> Hugh
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I'm not sure what you're asking for.
>>
>> He's trying to figure out whether you really think kids
>> become chubby at the age of nine because of genetics.
>
> But since he's listed a bunch of counter-examples, maybe
> he thinks YOU think it's really genetics. Or maybe he's
> totally missed the point that there are other ways to
> pass traits on to your kids.
>
> Hugh

All of examples are true, statistically speaking. Even republican parents
generally have republican kids, even if the kids are raised in a different
household (i.e. adoption). Oddly enough, the household that you are raised
in doesn't really have much of an effect on one's personality (excepting
abusive ones). It's all genetics and unique environment.