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John Hanson
September 17th 04, 03:12 AM
I've found out what my problem is/was with my loss of motor control
while deadlifting. I found it on page 425 of The Weightlifting
Encylopedia for those of you who own that book. It describes what
happens to me perfectly.

I'll quote, "It is a strange sensation, because you maintain full
awareness of what is going on but cannot control body tremors or
sometimes speak to those around you, although you can clearly see and
understand the concern on their faces."

The one thing that concerns me is that "the reports of such
occurrences in athletes lifting weights have generally been associated
with serious medical conditions, such as heart disease, manifestations
of which may have been brought to the surface by strenuous activity."
He mentions this in the first paragraph but yet the rest of the
section he makes it sound like it's no big deal.

Anywho, I think the reason I suffered from it in the past was that I
would take a deep breath at the top and not exhale until the deadlift
was locked out. That and maybe a tight belt. At the TCO, where I
didn't have this happen, I wore my belt loose and took a final breath
at the bottom just before starting the pull.

Wayne S. Hill
September 17th 04, 03:21 AM
John Hanson wrote:

> I've found out what my problem is/was with my loss of motor
> control while deadlifting. I found it on page 425 of The
> Weightlifting Encylopedia for those of you who own that
> book. It describes what happens to me perfectly.
>
> I'll quote, "It is a strange sensation, because you maintain
> full awareness of what is going on but cannot control body
> tremors or sometimes speak to those around you, although you
> can clearly see and understand the concern on their faces."
>
> The one thing that concerns me is that "the reports of such
> occurrences in athletes lifting weights have generally been
> associated with serious medical conditions, such as heart
> disease, manifestations of which may have been brought to
> the surface by strenuous activity." He mentions this in the
> first paragraph but yet the rest of the section he makes it
> sound like it's no big deal.
>
> Anywho, I think the reason I suffered from it in the past
> was that I would take a deep breath at the top and not
> exhale until the deadlift was locked out. That and maybe a
> tight belt. At the TCO, where I didn't have this happen, I
> wore my belt loose and took a final breath at the bottom
> just before starting the pull.

Get thee to a doc: a cardiologist and/or neurologist. You
definitely want to get to the bottom of this.

--
-Wayne

John Hanson
September 17th 04, 03:32 AM
On 17 Sep 2004 02:21:06 GMT, "Wayne S. Hill" > wrote
in misc.fitness.weights:

>John Hanson wrote:
>
>> I've found out what my problem is/was with my loss of motor
>> control while deadlifting. I found it on page 425 of The
>> Weightlifting Encylopedia for those of you who own that
>> book. It describes what happens to me perfectly.
>>
>> I'll quote, "It is a strange sensation, because you maintain
>> full awareness of what is going on but cannot control body
>> tremors or sometimes speak to those around you, although you
>> can clearly see and understand the concern on their faces."
>>
>> The one thing that concerns me is that "the reports of such
>> occurrences in athletes lifting weights have generally been
>> associated with serious medical conditions, such as heart
>> disease, manifestations of which may have been brought to
>> the surface by strenuous activity." He mentions this in the
>> first paragraph but yet the rest of the section he makes it
>> sound like it's no big deal.
>>
>> Anywho, I think the reason I suffered from it in the past
>> was that I would take a deep breath at the top and not
>> exhale until the deadlift was locked out. That and maybe a
>> tight belt. At the TCO, where I didn't have this happen, I
>> wore my belt loose and took a final breath at the bottom
>> just before starting the pull.
>
>Get thee to a doc: a cardiologist and/or neurologist. You
>definitely want to get to the bottom of this.

I did. They took a gallon of blood and all my tests came back
negative. Then, they did and MRI/MRA (just seen the bill for
that...about $1500 a piece) and that came back normal but they did say
that there was a slight thickening of my sinuses. I thought I read
something about sinuses in that section but can't seem to locate it
now.

Wayne S. Hill
September 17th 04, 03:00 PM
John Hanson wrote:

> "Wayne S. Hill" > wrote:
>
>>Get thee to a doc: a cardiologist and/or neurologist. You
>>definitely want to get to the bottom of this.
>
> I did. They took a gallon of blood and all my tests came
> back negative. Then, they did and MRI/MRA (just seen the
> bill for that...about $1500 a piece) and that came back
> normal but they did say that there was a slight thickening
> of my sinuses. I thought I read something about sinuses in
> that section but can't seem to locate it now.

I presume they were referring to a blood sinus, such as the aortal
or carotid sinus. These large volumes in certain blood vessels
often have pressure sensors that regulate heart rate and can cause
a gradual or sudden loss of BP in certain circumstances.

--
-Wayne

John Hanson
September 17th 04, 03:21 PM
On 17 Sep 2004 14:00:14 GMT, "Wayne S. Hill" > wrote
in misc.fitness.weights:

>John Hanson wrote:
>
>> "Wayne S. Hill" > wrote:
>>
>>>Get thee to a doc: a cardiologist and/or neurologist. You
>>>definitely want to get to the bottom of this.
>>
>> I did. They took a gallon of blood and all my tests came
>> back negative. Then, they did and MRI/MRA (just seen the
>> bill for that...about $1500 a piece) and that came back
>> normal but they did say that there was a slight thickening
>> of my sinuses. I thought I read something about sinuses in
>> that section but can't seem to locate it now.
>
>I presume they were referring to a blood sinus, such as the aortal
>or carotid sinus. These large volumes in certain blood vessels
>often have pressure sensors that regulate heart rate and can cause
>a gradual or sudden loss of BP in certain circumstances.

Yeah. I reread the section and that is exactly what he was talking
about.

"Weightlifters do occasionally suffer a near loss of consciousness
during overhead lifting. The cause is not entirely understood, but it
probably involves one or both of the following mechanisms: a) a
reduction in the blood supply to the brain when pressure is placed on
the carotid arteries, b) intrathoracic pressure increases as a result
of performing the Valsalva maneuver (holding ones breath against a
closed glottis), and, c) pressure on the carotid sinus, which can slow
the heart rate (this latter theory was offered to me by a friend, avid
weight trainer and eminent surgeon, Dr. Herbert Perry)."

David Cohen
September 17th 04, 04:04 PM
"Wayne S. Hill" > wrote in message
...
> John Hanson wrote:
>
> > "Wayne S. Hill" > wrote:
> >
> >>Get thee to a doc: a cardiologist and/or neurologist. You
> >>definitely want to get to the bottom of this.
> >
> > I did. They took a gallon of blood and all my tests came
> > back negative. Then, they did and MRI/MRA (just seen the
> > bill for that...about $1500 a piece) and that came back
> > normal but they did say that there was a slight thickening
> > of my sinuses. I thought I read something about sinuses in
> > that section but can't seem to locate it now.
>
> I presume they were referring to a blood sinus, such as the aortal
> or carotid sinus.

No. Nasal sinuses.

> These large volumes in certain blood vessels
> often have pressure sensors that regulate heart rate and can cause
> a gradual or sudden loss of BP in certain circumstances.

Such as the vasovagal near-syncope that John describes. Comes from bearing
down, exhaling against a closed glottus. If it happens only when he bears
down...constipation could be REALLY annoying...and never occurs when he
doesn't bear down, no big deal. Don't bear down.

I'm David W Cohen, and I approved this post.


>
> --
> -Wayne

Proton Soup
September 17th 04, 05:09 PM
On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 09:21:28 -0500, John Hanson
> wrote:

>On 17 Sep 2004 14:00:14 GMT, "Wayne S. Hill" > wrote
>in misc.fitness.weights:
>
>>John Hanson wrote:
>>
>>> "Wayne S. Hill" > wrote:
>>>
>>>>Get thee to a doc: a cardiologist and/or neurologist. You
>>>>definitely want to get to the bottom of this.
>>>
>>> I did. They took a gallon of blood and all my tests came
>>> back negative. Then, they did and MRI/MRA (just seen the
>>> bill for that...about $1500 a piece) and that came back
>>> normal but they did say that there was a slight thickening
>>> of my sinuses. I thought I read something about sinuses in
>>> that section but can't seem to locate it now.
>>
>>I presume they were referring to a blood sinus, such as the aortal
>>or carotid sinus. These large volumes in certain blood vessels
>>often have pressure sensors that regulate heart rate and can cause
>>a gradual or sudden loss of BP in certain circumstances.
>
>Yeah. I reread the section and that is exactly what he was talking
>about.
>
>"Weightlifters do occasionally suffer a near loss of consciousness
>during overhead lifting. The cause is not entirely understood, but it
>probably involves one or both of the following mechanisms: a) a
>reduction in the blood supply to the brain when pressure is placed on
>the carotid arteries, b) intrathoracic pressure increases as a result
>of performing the Valsalva maneuver (holding ones breath against a
>closed glottis), and, c) pressure on the carotid sinus, which can slow
>the heart rate (this latter theory was offered to me by a friend, avid
>weight trainer and eminent surgeon, Dr. Herbert Perry)."

Don't wear a tie to your next meet.

-----------
Proton Soup

"Homo sapiens non urinat in ventum."