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Jim
September 18th 04, 04:37 AM
Shouldnt this **** be illegal. This seems like a common problem. I don't
mean censoring the internet,but shouldnt companies or whoever who damage or
do bad stuff to a persons computer be liable?

Jim

Big_Jerk
September 18th 04, 04:48 AM
On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 23:37:08 -0400, "Jim" > wrote:

>Shouldnt this **** be illegal. This seems like a common problem. I don't
>mean censoring the internet,but shouldnt companies or whoever who damage or
>do bad stuff to a persons computer be liable?
>

I totally agree......in addition to a good virus scanner, I have to run
Spybot and Adaware once a week to get the scumware off my
computer.

Brandon Berg
September 18th 04, 06:52 AM
"Big_Jerk" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 23:37:08 -0400, "Jim" > wrote:
>
>>Shouldnt this **** be illegal. This seems like a common problem. I don't
>>mean censoring the internet,but shouldnt companies or whoever who damage
>>or
>>do bad stuff to a persons computer be liable?
>
> I totally agree......in addition to a good virus scanner, I have to run
> Spybot and Adaware once a week to get the scumware off my
> computer.

I don't know what you're doing wrong, but I've never had a problem, even
though I'm using a suite of software (Windows/IE/Outlook Express) that the
Linux fanatics tell me is going to call down a storm of nuclear meteors to
destroy my computer and everyone I love.

To answer the original question, it's my understanding that you agree to it
when you accept the EULA. It's very important to be careful about what you
install.

Jim
September 18th 04, 06:58 AM
"Brandon Berg" > wrote in message
...
> "Big_Jerk" > wrote in message
> ...
> > On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 23:37:08 -0400, "Jim" > wrote:
> >
> >>Shouldnt this **** be illegal. This seems like a common problem. I don't
> >>mean censoring the internet,but shouldnt companies or whoever who damage
> >>or
> >>do bad stuff to a persons computer be liable?
> >
> > I totally agree......in addition to a good virus scanner, I have to run
> > Spybot and Adaware once a week to get the scumware off my
> > computer.
>
> I don't know what you're doing wrong, but I've never had a problem, even
> though I'm using a suite of software (Windows/IE/Outlook Express) that the
> Linux fanatics tell me is going to call down a storm of nuclear meteors to
> destroy my computer and everyone I love.
>
> To answer the original question, it's my understanding that you agree to
it
> when you accept the EULA. It's very important to be careful about what you
> install.
>
>
Absolutely not. It ****ed up my computer and I didnt accept or install
anything. I clicked on a link..thats all.

Jim

Big_Jerk
September 18th 04, 07:08 AM
On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 22:52:42 -0700, "Brandon Berg" > wrote:

>"Big_Jerk" > wrote in message
...
>> On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 23:37:08 -0400, "Jim" > wrote:
>>
>>>Shouldnt this **** be illegal. This seems like a common problem. I don't
>>>mean censoring the internet,but shouldnt companies or whoever who damage
>>>or
>>>do bad stuff to a persons computer be liable?
>>
>> I totally agree......in addition to a good virus scanner, I have to run
>> Spybot and Adaware once a week to get the scumware off my
>> computer.
>
>I don't know what you're doing wrong, but I've never had a problem, even
>though I'm using a suite of software (Windows/IE/Outlook Express) that the
>Linux fanatics tell me is going to call down a storm of nuclear meteors to
>destroy my computer and everyone I love.
>
>To answer the original question, it's my understanding that you agree to it
>when you accept the EULA. It's very important to be careful about what you
>install.
>

I'm not doing anything wrong.
I DO NOT allow or agree to install anything like GATOR, GAIN, Butt Buddy,
WEB Assistant, etc, etc.......(of which of course if you agree to, you're just
agreeing to install Spyware).

It's inherent to the operating system......javascript and cookies will get you,
unless of course you really ratch'it up your security settings in IE to the max
settings.

Run Spybot or Adaware on your system, and I think you'll be surprised
at what it finds..

John M. Williams
September 18th 04, 07:57 AM
"Brandon Berg" > wrote:
>"Big_Jerk" > wrote:
>> "Jim" > wrote:
>>
>>>Shouldnt this **** be illegal. This seems like a common problem. I don't
>>>mean censoring the internet,but shouldnt companies or whoever who damage
>>>or do bad stuff to a persons computer be liable?
>>
>> I totally agree......in addition to a good virus scanner, I have to run
>> Spybot and Adaware once a week to get the scumware off my
>> computer.
>
>I don't know what you're doing wrong, but I've never had a problem, even
>though I'm using a suite of software (Windows/IE/Outlook Express) that the
>Linux fanatics tell me is going to call down a storm of nuclear meteors to
>destroy my computer and everyone I love.
>
>To answer the original question, it's my understanding that you agree to it
>when you accept the EULA. It's very important to be careful about what you
>install.

You can occasionally find a rogue spyware dumper that installs ****
without the EULA, and then you're screwed bigtime. I had to use
Mozilla on my office computer and couldn't use MSIE for many months.
If you killed the files that started the popups, the main program
would spawn new ones with random, nonsense names. Adaware, Spybot,
and Spyhunter couldn't touch it. I had to search the web for
information, and once if found information on all the potential names,
I had to search the whole drive for them and delete them manually.

Peter Webb
September 18th 04, 09:05 AM
"Jim" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Brandon Berg" > wrote in message
> ...
> > "Big_Jerk" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > > On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 23:37:08 -0400, "Jim" > wrote:
> > >
> > >>Shouldnt this **** be illegal. This seems like a common problem. I
don't
> > >>mean censoring the internet,but shouldnt companies or whoever who
damage
> > >>or
> > >>do bad stuff to a persons computer be liable?
> > >
> > > I totally agree......in addition to a good virus scanner, I have to
run
> > > Spybot and Adaware once a week to get the scumware off my
> > > computer.
> >
> > I don't know what you're doing wrong, but I've never had a problem, even
> > though I'm using a suite of software (Windows/IE/Outlook Express) that
the
> > Linux fanatics tell me is going to call down a storm of nuclear meteors
to
> > destroy my computer and everyone I love.
> >
> > To answer the original question, it's my understanding that you agree to
> it
> > when you accept the EULA. It's very important to be careful about what
you
> > install.
> >
> >
> Absolutely not. It ****ed up my computer and I didnt accept or install
> anything. I clicked on a link..thats all.
>
> Jim
>
>

No, you didn't.

Unless you want to identify the link you clicked on, and we can find a new,
massive security hole that so far has eluded everybody else that uses the
internet ...

Pistolsat40paces
September 18th 04, 02:23 PM
"Big_Jerk" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 22:52:42 -0700, "Brandon Berg" >
wrote:
>
> >"Big_Jerk" > wrote in message
> ...
> >> On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 23:37:08 -0400, "Jim" > wrote:
> >>
> >>>Shouldnt this **** be illegal. This seems like a common problem. I
don't
> >>>mean censoring the internet,but shouldnt companies or whoever who
damage
> >>>or
> >>>do bad stuff to a persons computer be liable?
> >>
> >> I totally agree......in addition to a good virus scanner, I have to run
> >> Spybot and Adaware once a week to get the scumware off my
> >> computer.
> >
> >I don't know what you're doing wrong, but I've never had a problem, even
> >though I'm using a suite of software (Windows/IE/Outlook Express) that
the
> >Linux fanatics tell me is going to call down a storm of nuclear meteors
to
> >destroy my computer and everyone I love.
> >
> >To answer the original question, it's my understanding that you agree to
it
> >when you accept the EULA. It's very important to be careful about what
you
> >install.
> >
>
> I'm not doing anything wrong.
> I DO NOT allow or agree to install anything like GATOR, GAIN, Butt Buddy,
> WEB Assistant, etc, etc.......(of which of course if you agree to, you're
just
> agreeing to install Spyware).
>
> It's inherent to the operating system......javascript and cookies will get
you,
> unless of course you reallty ratch'it up your security settings in IE to
the max
> settings.
you're going to have to show me how they do that! i've been programming with
javascript and cookies for 7 or 8 years now and i have no clue how to
unknowingly install programs on someone's PC using those avenues.

there's no shame in being duped by these evil people. they got me one time.
i dont know...i must've had a brain embollism or something...i got an email
from telling me that my account had been sending spam
out and i needed to run the attached program to fix it. even as a clicked on
it i knew they had gotten me...i was stupid that day. had to re-do my whole
machine. nasty.
>
> Run Spybot or Adaware on your system, and I think you'll be surprised
> at what it finds..
>

ray miller
September 18th 04, 04:11 PM
>you're going to have to show me how they do that! i've been programming with
>javascript and cookies for 7 or 8 years now and i have no clue how to
>unknowingly install programs on someone's PC using those avenues.

You were following the rules - the bad guys don't.

If you really want to know how to use a particular exploit you should
be able to find out easy enough with google.

Ray
--
rmnsuk
273/187/182

fj
September 19th 04, 01:34 AM
"Jim" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Brandon Berg" > wrote in message
> ...
> > "Big_Jerk" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > > On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 23:37:08 -0400, "Jim" > wrote:
> > >
> > >>Shouldnt this **** be illegal. This seems like a common problem. I
don't
> > >>mean censoring the internet,but shouldnt companies or whoever who
damage
> > >>or
> > >>do bad stuff to a persons computer be liable?
> > >
> > > I totally agree......in addition to a good virus scanner, I have to
run
> > > Spybot and Adaware once a week to get the scumware off my
> > > computer.
> >
> > I don't know what you're doing wrong, but I've never had a problem, even
> > though I'm using a suite of software (Windows/IE/Outlook Express) that
the
> > Linux fanatics tell me is going to call down a storm of nuclear meteors
to
> > destroy my computer and everyone I love.
> >
> > To answer the original question, it's my understanding that you agree to
> it
> > when you accept the EULA. It's very important to be careful about what
you
> > install.
> >
> >
> Absolutely not. It ****ed up my computer and I didnt accept or install
> anything. I clicked on a link..thats all.
>
> Jim
>
>

There are lots of setting in internet explorer. For example, you can block
ActiveX component like Flash plug-in, Google tollbar..., or any malicious
client script from running. In a simple word, increase your security/privacy
level.

You did give the permission to install spyware on your computer without you
ever noticed it.

Open Internet Explorer menu->tools->internet option->security tab->custom
level
you will find a lot of options to choose from. That's how you block spyware.

Also, apply latest windows security update from Microsoft website. When you
are asked to install something that you are not sure, answer no.

HTH

-fj

fj
September 19th 04, 01:46 AM
"John M. Williams" > wrote in message
...
> "Brandon Berg" > wrote:
> >"Big_Jerk" > wrote:
> >> "Jim" > wrote:
> >>
> >>>Shouldnt this **** be illegal. This seems like a common problem. I
don't
> >>>mean censoring the internet,but shouldnt companies or whoever who
damage
> >>>or do bad stuff to a persons computer be liable?
> >>
> >> I totally agree......in addition to a good virus scanner, I have to run
> >> Spybot and Adaware once a week to get the scumware off my
> >> computer.
> >
> >I don't know what you're doing wrong, but I've never had a problem, even
> >though I'm using a suite of software (Windows/IE/Outlook Express) that
the
> >Linux fanatics tell me is going to call down a storm of nuclear meteors
to
> >destroy my computer and everyone I love.
> >
> >To answer the original question, it's my understanding that you agree to
it
> >when you accept the EULA. It's very important to be careful about what
you
> >install.
>
> You can occasionally find a rogue spyware dumper that installs ****
> without the EULA, and then you're screwed . bigtime. I had to use
> Mozilla on my office computer and couldn't use MSIE for many months.
> If you killed the files that started the popups, the main program
> would spawn new ones with random, nonsense names. Adaware, Spybot,
> and Spyhunter couldn't touch it. I had to search the web for
> information, and once if found information on all the potential names,
> I had to search the whole drive for them and delete them manually.

In windows operating system, a program(spyware) can be loaded automatically.
If it's in startup folder that's a easy fix. you can remove it. But if it's
in a lower level, you have to open windows registery
run\regedit ->HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\MICROSOFT\WINDOWS\CURR ENTVERSION\R
UN
You will find interesting programs that are loaded when you boot up your
computer. You can change it if you do a backup first and are sure what you
are doing.

HTH

fj

MJL
September 19th 04, 08:55 PM
On Sat, 18 Sep 2004 18:05:26 +1000, "Peter Webb"
> wrote:

>
>"Jim" > wrote in message
...
>>
>> "Brandon Berg" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> > "Big_Jerk" > wrote in message
>> > ...
>> > > On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 23:37:08 -0400, "Jim" > wrote:
>> > >
>> > >>Shouldnt this **** be illegal. This seems like a common problem. I
>don't
>> > >>mean censoring the internet,but shouldnt companies or whoever who
>damage
>> > >>or
>> > >>do bad stuff to a persons computer be liable?
>> > >
>> > > I totally agree......in addition to a good virus scanner, I have to
>run
>> > > Spybot and Adaware once a week to get the scumware off my
>> > > computer.
>> >
>> > I don't know what you're doing wrong, but I've never had a problem, even
>> > though I'm using a suite of software (Windows/IE/Outlook Express) that
>the
>> > Linux fanatics tell me is going to call down a storm of nuclear meteors
>to
>> > destroy my computer and everyone I love.
>> >
>> > To answer the original question, it's my understanding that you agree to
>> it
>> > when you accept the EULA. It's very important to be careful about what
>you
>> > install.
>> >
>> >
>> Absolutely not. It ****ed up my computer and I didnt accept or install
>> anything. I clicked on a link..thats all.
>>
>> Jim
>>
>>
>
>No, you didn't.
>
>Unless you want to identify the link you clicked on, and we can find a new,
>massive security hole that so far has eluded everybody else that uses the
>internet ...
>
>

He probably means tracking cookies. One can tun off cookies but it
makes it a pain in the ass to use some useful websites and useful
functions.


--
http://www.texansfortruth.org/

MJL
September 19th 04, 09:03 PM
On Sat, 18 Sep 2004 17:46:03 -0700, "fj" >
wrote:


>In windows operating system, a program(spyware) can be loaded automatically.
>If it's in startup folder that's a easy fix. you can remove it. But if it's
>in a lower level, you have to open windows registery
>run\regedit ->HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\MICROSOFT\WINDOWS\CURR ENTVERSION\R
>UN
>You will find interesting programs that are loaded when you boot up your
>computer. You can change it if you do a backup first and are sure what you
>are doing.
>
>HTH
>
>fj
>

Messing with registry bad.

I think most people ought to run a firewall and deny everything that
looks at all suspicious. Over time even a novice will figure out what
things ought to have access and what should not. Like, if you click
no for Generic Host Process your whole machine will stop working and
you'll figure out you should let that go. However, viewmgr can be
safely denied (I have no idea what that is but denying it does not
cost me any functionality).

A firewall is the "oops" catcher that keeps REALLY bad spyware, like
keystroke loggers, from having unfettered access to the net. Of
course, in today's world, it really is necessary to also be running AV
software with the subscriptions up to date. My McAfee AV updates its
virus definitions almost daily. Yes it is a pain when that yearly
subscription comes due but I consider it a cost of being online.


--
http://www.texansfortruth.org/

Randy Shrader
September 19th 04, 09:29 PM
"MJL" > wrote in message
...
> On Sat, 18 Sep 2004 17:46:03 -0700, "fj" >
> wrote:
>
>
> Messing with registry bad.
>
> I think most people ought to run a firewall and deny everything that
> looks at all suspicious. Over time even a novice will figure out what
> things ought to have access and what should not. Like, if you click
> no for Generic Host Process your whole machine will stop working and
> you'll figure out you should let that go. However, viewmgr can be
> safely denied (I have no idea what that is but denying it does not
> cost me any functionality).
>
> A firewall is the "oops" catcher that keeps REALLY bad spyware, like
> keystroke loggers, from having unfettered access to the net. Of
> course, in today's world, it really is necessary to also be running AV
> software with the subscriptions up to date. My McAfee AV updates its
> virus definitions almost daily. Yes it is a pain when that yearly
> subscription comes due but I consider it a cost of being online.
>
>
> --
> http://www.texansfortruth.org/



There's a good guide here that'll tell you what each process does and which
ones can be disabled:

http://www.blackviper.com/

Randy

Jim
September 19th 04, 09:51 PM
"John M. Williams" > wrote in message
...
> "Brandon Berg" > wrote:
> >"Big_Jerk" > wrote:
> >> "Jim" > wrote:
> >>
> >>>Shouldnt this **** be illegal. This seems like a common problem. I
don't
> >>>mean censoring the internet,but shouldnt companies or whoever who
damage
> >>>or do bad stuff to a persons computer be liable?
> >>
> >> I totally agree......in addition to a good virus scanner, I have to run
> >> Spybot and Adaware once a week to get the scumware off my
> >> computer.
> >
> >I don't know what you're doing wrong, but I've never had a problem, even
> >though I'm using a suite of software (Windows/IE/Outlook Express) that
the
> >Linux fanatics tell me is going to call down a storm of nuclear meteors
to
> >destroy my computer and everyone I love.
> >
> >To answer the original question, it's my understanding that you agree to
it
> >when you accept the EULA. It's very important to be careful about what
you
> >install.
>
> You can occasionally find a rogue spyware dumper that installs ****
> without the EULA, and then you're screwed . bigtime. I had to use
> Mozilla on my office computer and couldn't use MSIE for many months.
> If you killed the files that started the popups, the main program
> would spawn new ones with random, nonsense names. Adaware, Spybot,
> and Spyhunter couldn't touch it. I had to search the web for
> information, and once if found information on all the potential names,
> I had to search the whole drive for them and delete them manually.

Thats what I had to do. Everytime I ran Spybot,it "fixed" it but then came
back. I had to google it and read the technical forums to do it manually. My
biggest gripe is that these seem to be known companies...not some renegade
hacker. It should be stopped.

Jim

bc
September 20th 04, 04:31 PM
"Jim" > wrote in message >...
> "John M. Williams" > wrote in message
> ...
> > "Brandon Berg" > wrote:
> > >"Big_Jerk" > wrote:
> > >> "Jim" > wrote:
> > >>
> > >>>Shouldnt this **** be illegal. This seems like a common problem. I
> don't
> > >>>mean censoring the internet,but shouldnt companies or whoever who
> damage
> > >>>or do bad stuff to a persons computer be liable?
> > >>
> > >> I totally agree......in addition to a good virus scanner, I have to run
> > >> Spybot and Adaware once a week to get the scumware off my

> > >> computer.
> > >
> > >I don't know what you're doing wrong, but I've never had a problem, even
> > >though I'm using a suite of software (Windows/IE/Outlook Express) that
> the
> > >Linux fanatics tell me is going to call down a storm of nuclear meteors
> to
> > >destroy my computer and everyone I love.
> > >
> > >To answer the original question, it's my understanding that you agree to
> it
> > >when you accept the EULA. It's very important to be careful about what
> you
> > >install.
> >
> > You can occasionally find a rogue spyware dumper that installs ****
> > without the EULA, and then you're screwed . bigtime. I had to use
> > Mozilla on my office computer and couldn't use MSIE for many months.
> > If you killed the files that started the popups, the main program
> > would spawn new ones with random, nonsense names. Adaware, Spybot,
> > and Spyhunter couldn't touch it. I had to search the web for
> > information, and once if found information on all the potential names,
> > I had to search the whole drive for them and delete them manually.
>
> Thats what I had to do. Everytime I ran Spybot,it "fixed" it but then came
> back. I had to google it and read the technical forums to do it manually. My
> biggest gripe is that these seem to be known companies...not some renegade
> hacker. It should be stopped.
>
> Jim


Been there, done that. The regedit fix worked fine. I agree that the
spyware stuff is incredibly annoying.

- bc

Seth Breidbart
September 22nd 04, 01:44 AM
In article >,
Peter Webb > wrote:
>"Jim" > wrote in message
...

>> Absolutely not. It ****ed up my computer and I didnt accept or install
>> anything. I clicked on a link..thats all.

>No, you didn't.
>
>Unless you want to identify the link you clicked on, and we can find a new,
>massive security hole that so far has eluded everybody else that uses the
>internet ...

Read bugtraq. Internet Exploder has many flaws, some of which are
known to be exploited by web sites to install spyware on the victim's
computer (and some of those have appeared on web sites without the
knowledge of the sites' owners).

Seth
--
chown -R us /yourbase

Seth Breidbart
September 22nd 04, 01:44 AM
In article >,
MJL > wrote:

>He probably means tracking cookies. One can tun off cookies but it
>makes it a pain in the ass to use some useful websites and useful
>functions.

At worst, tracking cookies cost you a little privacy. They don't
screw up your computer, they just might let Site A know that you went
to Site B (and which pages you viewed there, or what you bought there,
etc.)

Seth
--
chown -R us /yourbase

Slambram
September 22nd 04, 03:49 PM
On Sat, 18 Sep 2004 01:58:53 -0400, "Jim" > wrote:

>Absolutely not. It ****ed up my computer and I didnt accept or install
>anything. I clicked on a link..thats all.
>
>Jim
>

Bull****. If i had a nickel for every time one of the users said
this. Funny how i've never had a Spyware problem. Yes, i know
computers and do it for a living, but that doesn't make me immune. I
surf the web just as much as the next guy.

August Pamplona
November 24th 04, 08:42 PM
In ,
John M. Williams > typed:
> "Brandon Berg" > wrote:
>> "Big_Jerk" > wrote:
>>> "Jim" > wrote:
>>>
>>>> Shouldnt this **** be illegal. This seems like a common problem. I
>>>> don't mean censoring the internet,but shouldnt companies or
>>>> whoever who damage or do bad stuff to a persons computer be liable?
>>>
>>> I totally agree......in addition to a good virus scanner, I have to
>>> run Spybot and Adaware once a week to get the scumware off my
>>> computer.
>>
>> I don't know what you're doing wrong, but I've never had a problem,
>> even though I'm using a suite of software (Windows/IE/Outlook
>> Express) that the Linux fanatics tell me is going to call down a
>> storm of nuclear meteors to destroy my computer and everyone I love.
>>
>> To answer the original question, it's my understanding that you
>> agree to it when you accept the EULA. It's very important to be
>> careful about what you install.
>
> You can occasionally find a rogue spyware dumper that installs ****
> without the EULA, and then you're screwed . bigtime. I had to use
> Mozilla on my office computer and couldn't use MSIE for many months.
> If you killed the files that started the popups, the main program
> would spawn new ones with random, nonsense names. Adaware, Spybot,
> and Spyhunter couldn't touch it. I had to search the web for
> information, and once if found information on all the potential names,
> I had to search the whole drive for them and delete them manually.

http://www.benedelman.org/news/111804-1.html

This guy claims a whole bunch of these programs installing through a
security exploit without ever explicitly asking for consent. From the
clip shown, there's a reference to some URL in the install process (you
are agreeing to the terms mentioned at http://somewhere.com sort of
thing) but no explicit EULA (where it actually shows what you are
agreeing to right there). It's probably not uncommon. It does seem to
give you the option to not install that **** but I can see how someone
who might fall more on the computer illiterate end of the spectrum (like
my dad) could easily get ****ed over by such spyware.

August Pamplona
--
The waterfall in Java is not wet.
- omegazero2003 on m.f.w.

a.a. # 1811 apatriot #20 Eater of smut
Proud member of the reality-based community.
The address in this message's 'From' field, in accordance with
individual.net's TOS, is real. However, almost all messages
reaching this address are deleted without human intervention.
In other words, if you e-mail me there, I will not receive your message.

To make sure that e-mail messages actually reach me,
make sure that my e-mail address is not hot.

John M. Williams
November 25th 04, 12:48 AM
"August Pamplona" > wrote:
>John M. Williams > typed:
>> "Brandon Berg" > wrote:
>>> "Big_Jerk" > wrote:
>>>> "Jim" > wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Shouldnt this **** be illegal. This seems like a common problem. I
>>>>> don't mean censoring the internet,but shouldnt companies or
>>>>> whoever who damage or do bad stuff to a persons computer be liable?
>>>>
>>>> I totally agree......in addition to a good virus scanner, I have to
>>>> run Spybot and Adaware once a week to get the scumware off my
>>>> computer.
>>>
>>> I don't know what you're doing wrong, but I've never had a problem,
>>> even though I'm using a suite of software (Windows/IE/Outlook
>>> Express) that the Linux fanatics tell me is going to call down a
>>> storm of nuclear meteors to destroy my computer and everyone I love.
>>>
>>> To answer the original question, it's my understanding that you
>>> agree to it when you accept the EULA. It's very important to be
>>> careful about what you install.
>>
>> You can occasionally find a rogue spyware dumper that installs ****
>> without the EULA, and then you're screwed . bigtime. I had to use
>> Mozilla on my office computer and couldn't use MSIE for many months.
>> If you killed the files that started the popups, the main program
>> would spawn new ones with random, nonsense names. Adaware, Spybot,
>> and Spyhunter couldn't touch it. I had to search the web for
>> information, and once if found information on all the potential names,
>> I had to search the whole drive for them and delete them manually.
>
>http://www.benedelman.org/news/111804-1.html
>
> This guy claims a whole bunch of these programs installing through a
>security exploit without ever explicitly asking for consent. From the
>clip shown, there's a reference to some URL in the install process (you
>are agreeing to the terms mentioned at http://somewhere.com sort of
>thing) but no explicit EULA (where it actually shows what you are
>agreeing to right there). It's probably not uncommon. It does seem to
>give you the option to not install that **** but I can see how someone
>who might fall more on the computer illiterate end of the spectrum (like
>my dad) could easily get ****ed over by such spyware.

I couldn't remember what it was that infected my office computer.
After a little Googling, I recall: VX2/Transponder. Here's what The
Guardian says about it:

"How bad can spyware get? By general agreement, the worst offender is
the VX2/ Transponder. 'This thing is horrendous,' says Healan. 'It
installs with no disclosure. There is no user interface. There is no
privacy statement or any documentation. It integrates with Internet
Explorer and is able to read every keyword the user types, every
website they visit. Then it uses their bandwidth to download ads.'
Webb points out that it collects the user's name and email address
too, adding that 'one of the companies involved, Mindset Interactive,
was recently sued after selling the collected email addresses to
marketers.'"

http://www.guardian.co.uk/online/story/0,3605,744203,00.html

Gee, for once, I actually agree with them on something. Numerous
variants of this thing have since been spawned, and each new one is
more difficult to remove.

bc
November 25th 04, 07:13 AM
John M. Williams > wrote in message >...
> "August Pamplona" > wrote:
> >John M. Williams > typed:
> >> "Brandon Berg" > wrote:
> >>> "Big_Jerk" > wrote:
> >>>> "Jim" > wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>>> Shouldnt this **** be illegal. This seems like a common problem. I
> >>>>> don't mean censoring the internet,but shouldnt companies or
> >>>>> whoever who damage or do bad stuff to a persons computer be liable?
> >>>>
> >>>> I totally agree......in addition to a good virus scanner, I have to
> >>>> run Spybot and Adaware once a week to get the scumware off my
> >>>> computer.
> >>>
> >>> I don't know what you're doing wrong, but I've never had a problem,
> >>> even though I'm using a suite of software (Windows/IE/Outlook
> >>> Express) that the Linux fanatics tell me is going to call down a
> >>> storm of nuclear meteors to destroy my computer and everyone I love.
> >>>
> >>> To answer the original question, it's my understanding that you
> >>> agree to it when you accept the EULA. It's very important to be
> >>> careful about what you install.
> >>
> >> You can occasionally find a rogue spyware dumper that installs ****
> >> without the EULA, and then you're screwed . bigtime. I had to use
> >> Mozilla on my office computer and couldn't use MSIE for many months.
> >> If you killed the files that started the popups, the main program
> >> would spawn new ones with random, nonsense names. Adaware, Spybot,
> >> and Spyhunter couldn't touch it. I had to search the web for
> >> information, and once if found information on all the potential names,
> >> I had to search the whole drive for them and delete them manually.
> >
> >http://www.benedelman.org/news/111804-1.html
> >
> > This guy claims a whole bunch of these programs installing through a
> >security exploit without ever explicitly asking for consent. From the
> >clip shown, there's a reference to some URL in the install process (you
> >are agreeing to the terms mentioned at http://somewhere.com sort of
> >thing) but no explicit EULA (where it actually shows what you are
> >agreeing to right there). It's probably not uncommon. It does seem to
> >give you the option to not install that **** but I can see how someone
> >who might fall more on the computer illiterate end of the spectrum (like
> >my dad) could easily get ****ed over by such spyware.
>
> I couldn't remember what it was that infected my office computer.
> After a little Googling, I recall: VX2/Transponder. Here's what The
> Guardian says about it:
>
> "How bad can spyware get? By general agreement, the worst offender is
> the VX2/ Transponder. 'This thing is horrendous,' says Healan. 'It
> installs with no disclosure. There is no user interface. There is no
> privacy statement or any documentation. It integrates with Internet
> Explorer and is able to read every keyword the user types, every
> website they visit. Then it uses their bandwidth to download ads.'
> Webb points out that it collects the user's name and email address
> too, adding that 'one of the companies involved, Mindset Interactive,
> was recently sued after selling the collected email addresses to
> marketers.'"
>
> http://www.guardian.co.uk/online/story/0,3605,744203,00.html
>
> Gee, for once, I actually agree with them on something. Numerous
> variants of this thing have since been spawned, and each new one is
> more difficult to remove.


I am so thinking of going to Linux for everyone at home with network access.

- bc

John HUDSON
November 25th 04, 09:11 AM
On 25 Nov 2004 08:06:23 GMT, DZ > wrote:

>bc > wrote:
>> John M. Williams > wrote
>>> I couldn't remember what it was that infected my office computer.
>>> After a little Googling, I recall: VX2/Transponder. Here's what The
>>> Guardian says about it:
>>>
>>> "How bad can spyware get? By general agreement, the worst offender is
>>> the VX2/ Transponder. 'This thing is horrendous,' says Healan. 'It
>>> installs with no disclosure. There is no user interface. There is no
>>> privacy statement or any documentation. It integrates with Internet
>>> Explorer and is able to read every keyword the user types, every
>>> website they visit. Then it uses their bandwidth to download ads.'
>>> Webb points out that it collects the user's name and email address
>>> too, adding that 'one of the companies involved, Mindset Interactive,
>>> was recently sued after selling the collected email addresses to
>>> marketers.'"
>>>
>>> http://www.guardian.co.uk/online/story/0,3605,744203,00.html
>>>
>>> Gee, for once, I actually agree with them on something. Numerous
>>> variants of this thing have since been spawned, and each new one is
>>> more difficult to remove.
>>
>> I am so thinking of going to Linux for everyone at home with network access.
>
>I do all networking via a Linux account called HUDSON. It does not
>have any data I'd regret losing. But nobody's breaking into it
>anyway. I ensure the traffic is encrypted, although the main reason is
>that I cannot always afford strings like "total utter ****ing retards"
>and other lyleisms to float in plain text through my computers.
>
>So, no breaking in... except for John Hudson - somehow he figured out
>how to decipher the encrypted packets and hackes into it all the time
>to edit my killfiles and also the newsgroups file, adding MFW and some
>kinky groups from which I have to unsubscribe almost daily.

I'm astounded sometimes at my own brilliance!

However, this endorsement by DZ does make it clear that it's not wise
to **** me off!! ;o)

>
>Needless to say the above spyware stories sound really horrifying!

Be very afraid!!

JRH

Axel of the North!
November 29th 04, 04:14 AM
On Wed, 24 Nov 2004 19:48:36 -0500, John M. Williams
> wrote:

>"August Pamplona" > wrote:
>>John M. Williams > typed:
>>> "Brandon Berg" > wrote:
>>>> "Big_Jerk" > wrote:
>>>>> "Jim" > wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> Shouldnt this **** be illegal. This seems like a common problem. I
>>>>>> don't mean censoring the internet,but shouldnt companies or
>>>>>> whoever who damage or do bad stuff to a persons computer be liable?
>>>>>
>>>>> I totally agree......in addition to a good virus scanner, I have to
>>>>> run Spybot and Adaware once a week to get the scumware off my
>>>>> computer.
>>>>
>>>> I don't know what you're doing wrong, but I've never had a problem,
>>>> even though I'm using a suite of software (Windows/IE/Outlook
>>>> Express) that the Linux fanatics tell me is going to call down a
>>>> storm of nuclear meteors to destroy my computer and everyone I love.
>>>>
>>>> To answer the original question, it's my understanding that you
>>>> agree to it when you accept the EULA. It's very important to be
>>>> careful about what you install.
>>>
>>> You can occasionally find a rogue spyware dumper that installs ****
>>> without the EULA, and then you're screwed . bigtime. I had to use
>>> Mozilla on my office computer and couldn't use MSIE for many months.
>>> If you killed the files that started the popups, the main program
>>> would spawn new ones with random, nonsense names. Adaware, Spybot,
>>> and Spyhunter couldn't touch it. I had to search the web for
>>> information, and once if found information on all the potential names,
>>> I had to search the whole drive for them and delete them manually.
>>
>>http://www.benedelman.org/news/111804-1.html
>>
>> This guy claims a whole bunch of these programs installing through a
>>security exploit without ever explicitly asking for consent. From the
>>clip shown, there's a reference to some URL in the install process (you
>>are agreeing to the terms mentioned at http://somewhere.com sort of
>>thing) but no explicit EULA (where it actually shows what you are
>>agreeing to right there). It's probably not uncommon. It does seem to
>>give you the option to not install that **** but I can see how someone
>>who might fall more on the computer illiterate end of the spectrum (like
>>my dad) could easily get ****ed over by such spyware.
>
>I couldn't remember what it was that infected my office computer.
>After a little Googling, I recall: VX2/Transponder. Here's what The
>Guardian says about it:
>
>"How bad can spyware get? By general agreement, the worst offender is
>the VX2/ Transponder. 'This thing is horrendous,' says Healan. 'It
>installs with no disclosure. There is no user interface. There is no
>privacy statement or any documentation. It integrates with Internet
>Explorer and is able to read every keyword the user types, every
>website they visit. Then it uses their bandwidth to download ads.'
>Webb points out that it collects the user's name and email address
>too, adding that 'one of the companies involved, Mindset Interactive,
>was recently sued after selling the collected email addresses to
>marketers.'"
>
>http://www.guardian.co.uk/online/story/0,3605,744203,00.html
>
>Gee, for once, I actually agree with them on something. Numerous
>variants of this thing have since been spawned, and each new one is
>more difficult to remove.

OMG! i hope *i* don't catch anything like that!