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Tiger Hillside
September 19th 04, 12:40 AM
For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs. I know that it is more
difficult to carry a life person than a well balanced stable weight. I
figure that the general weight training I am doing is the right path,
but I am trying to set a weight goal. Does anyone have some idea of
how to translate this to, say, a deadlift or curl or something?

Proton Soup
September 19th 04, 01:08 AM
On 19 Sep 2004 00:10:37 GMT, geek_girl > wrote:

>In > Tiger Hillside wrote:
>> For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
>> 125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs.
>
>Can't you think of a way to get her upstairs before you give her the
>Rohypnol? Alternatively, you could stay downstairs and do her on the
>couch, but that's just plain tacky.
>
>> I know that it is more
>> difficult to carry a life person than a well balanced stable weight.
>
>Not if the person is conscious and *wants* to be carried. In that case
>it's much easier than carrying dead weight. Even I could carry a willing
>125 lb person up a flight of stairs.

Yeah, I's thinking the same thing. If she wraps her arms and legs
around you to hold on, then it's mostly a leg exercise, with a bit of
work on the back, too, to keep it erect.

-----------
Proton Soup

"Homo sapiens non urinat in ventum."

geek_girl
September 19th 04, 01:10 AM
In > Tiger Hillside wrote:
> For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
> 125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs.

Can't you think of a way to get her upstairs before you give her the
Rohypnol? Alternatively, you could stay downstairs and do her on the
couch, but that's just plain tacky.

> I know that it is more
> difficult to carry a life person than a well balanced stable weight.

Not if the person is conscious and *wants* to be carried. In that case
it's much easier than carrying dead weight. Even I could carry a willing
125 lb person up a flight of stairs.

Justin Case
September 19th 04, 01:22 AM
On Sat, 18 Sep 2004 23:40:56 GMT, Tiger Hillside
> wrote:

>For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
>125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs. I know that it is more
>difficult to carry a life person than a well balanced stable weight. I
>figure that the general weight training I am doing is the right path,
>but I am trying to set a weight goal. Does anyone have some idea of
>how to translate this to, say, a deadlift or curl or something?
>
How about a deadlift & curl and front squats.
Barbell step ups too for the going upstairs part and
some twisting/bending work for your midsection.
Those seem to me like the most obvious but I can also
see SLDL and conventional squats.

Kevin J. Coolidge
September 19th 04, 01:55 AM
carry a lighter person up the stairs and work your way up.


"Tiger Hillside" > wrote in message
...
> For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
> 125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs. I know that it is more
> difficult to carry a life person than a well balanced stable weight. I
> figure that the general weight training I am doing is the right path,
> but I am trying to set a weight goal. Does anyone have some idea of
> how to translate this to, say, a deadlift or curl or something?
>
>

Tiger Hillside
September 19th 04, 02:02 AM
On 19 Sep 2004 00:10:37 GMT, geek_girl > wrote:

>In > Tiger Hillside wrote:
>> For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
>> 125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs.
>
>Can't you think of a way to get her upstairs before you give her the
>Rohypnol? Alternatively, you could stay downstairs and do her on the
>couch, but that's just plain tacky.
>
>> I know that it is more
>> difficult to carry a life person than a well balanced stable weight.
>
>Not if the person is conscious and *wants* to be carried. In that case
>it's much easier than carrying dead weight. Even I could carry a willing
>125 lb person up a flight of stairs.

She is will, but medically it is difficult. She should be able to hold
on but now with her legs. And I want to be able to do this with ease,
as thought it did not matter.

Tiger Hillside
September 19th 04, 02:02 AM
On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 00:22:20 GMT, Justin Case >
wrote:

>On Sat, 18 Sep 2004 23:40:56 GMT, Tiger Hillside
> wrote:
>
>>For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
>>125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs. I know that it is more
>>difficult to carry a life person than a well balanced stable weight. I
>>figure that the general weight training I am doing is the right path,
>>but I am trying to set a weight goal. Does anyone have some idea of
>>how to translate this to, say, a deadlift or curl or something?
>>
>How about a deadlift & curl and front squats.
>Barbell step ups too for the going upstairs part and
>some twisting/bending work for your midsection.
>Those seem to me like the most obvious but I can also
>see SLDL and conventional squats.

Sorry, it was the weight amount I was wondering. That is, how much
deadlift seems like 125 lb of person up stairs? How much curl?

Tiger Hillside
September 19th 04, 02:03 AM
On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 00:55:46 GMT, "Kevin J. Coolidge" >
wrote:

>carry a lighter person up the stairs and work your way up.
>
<slap head>

Now why didn't I think of that?

;-)

All I have to do is find willing people in, say, 5 lb increments.

>"Tiger Hillside" > wrote in message
...
>> For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
>> 125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs. I know that it is more
>> difficult to carry a life person than a well balanced stable weight. I
>> figure that the general weight training I am doing is the right path,
>> but I am trying to set a weight goal. Does anyone have some idea of
>> how to translate this to, say, a deadlift or curl or something?
>>
>>
>

JC Der Koenig
September 19th 04, 02:25 AM
"Tiger Hillside" > wrote in message
...
>
> All I have to do is find willing people in, say, 5 lb increments.
>

Get a duffel bag and fill it with various objects until you can carry it
upstairs with 200 lbs in it. After that, a 125 lb person should be easy.

David
September 19th 04, 02:35 AM
"Tiger Hillside" > wrote in message
...
> For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
> 125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs. I know that it is more
> difficult to carry a life person than a well balanced stable weight. I
> figure that the general weight training I am doing is the right path,
> but I am trying to set a weight goal. Does anyone have some idea of
> how to translate this to, say, a deadlift or curl or something?
>
I would say that alignment would be the major issue - your lower back will
give way no matter how much strength you have in your legs and upper body.
So if you find a way to sling her over your shoulder then you are most of
the way there

Dally
September 19th 04, 02:42 AM
Kevin J. Coolidge wrote:
> carry a lighter person up the stairs and work your way up.

Or better yet, carry the 125 person part way, then set her down for a
moment while you "go tend to an errand", then come back and carry her
the rest of the way. :-)

I think it's sweet that you want to pretend that you can do it with
ease, as if it doesn't matter. She'll see through you, of course, but
it won't matter. Keep trying and eventually you'll be able to. (And
maybe she'll weigh less in time.)

Dally

Dally
September 19th 04, 02:44 AM
geek_girl wrote:
> In > Tiger Hillside wrote:
>
>>For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
>>125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs.
>
> Can't you think of a way to get her upstairs before you give her the
> Rohypnol? Alternatively, you could stay downstairs and do her on the
> couch, but that's just plain tacky.

That's funny, I guessed a completely different scenario: I'm seeing a
man carrying his disabled wife. I interpreted him wanting to do it with
ease not being macho, but wanting to make her not feel guilty for having
him need to do this.

I suspect I've had better dates than you.

Dally

geek_girl
September 19th 04, 02:54 AM
In > Dally wrote:
> geek_girl wrote:
>> In > Tiger Hillside wrote:
>>
>>>For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
>>>125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs.
>>
>> Can't you think of a way to get her upstairs before you give her the
>> Rohypnol? Alternatively, you could stay downstairs and do her on the
>> couch, but that's just plain tacky.
>
> That's funny, I guessed a completely different scenario: I'm seeing a
> man carrying his disabled wife.

Why? If she's permanently disabled, there's all kinds of equipment
available that would be much more efficient than him carrying her, and
that would allow her to get upstairs by herself if he's not available.
And if she's temporarily disabled, it's likely that by the time he's
trained enough to do it easily, she'll be better. It just doesn't make
sense.

> I interpreted him wanting to do it
> with ease not being macho, but wanting to make her not feel guilty
> for having him need to do this.

Have you ever been disabled, even temporarily? Not wanting to need help
has very little to do with guilt or how easy it is for someone to help
you.

> I suspect I've had better dates than you.

I suspect I've had a lot more dates than you.

Tiger Hillside
September 19th 04, 03:17 AM
On 19 Sep 2004 01:54:49 GMT, geek_girl > wrote:

>In > Dally wrote:
>> geek_girl wrote:
>>> In > Tiger Hillside wrote:
>>>
>>>>For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
>>>>125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs.
>>>
>>> Can't you think of a way to get her upstairs before you give her the
>>> Rohypnol? Alternatively, you could stay downstairs and do her on the
>>> couch, but that's just plain tacky.
>>
>> That's funny, I guessed a completely different scenario: I'm seeing a
>> man carrying his disabled wife.
>
>Why? If she's permanently disabled, there's all kinds of equipment
>available that would be much more efficient than him carrying her, and
>that would allow her to get upstairs by herself if he's not available.
>And if she's temporarily disabled, it's likely that by the time he's
>trained enough to do it easily, she'll be better. It just doesn't make
>sense.

How about if it is a close friend or relative not living with me? Or a
spouse and the issue is other places, not home? The disabled do leave
the house on occasion.

>> I interpreted him wanting to do it
>> with ease not being macho, but wanting to make her not feel guilty
>> for having him need to do this.
>
>Have you ever been disabled, even temporarily? Not wanting to need help
>has very little to do with guilt or how easy it is for someone to help
>you.

That, however, is an issue.

>> I suspect I've had better dates than you.
>
>I suspect I've had a lot more dates than you.

I suspect that you were not joking with your first post. In which case
I should either feel insult or sorry for you. Since you don't know me
at all you really could not have insulted me so your post said more
about you than me. So I do feel sorry for you.

Tiger Hillside
September 19th 04, 03:17 AM
On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 01:25:47 GMT, "JC Der Koenig"
> wrote:

>"Tiger Hillside" > wrote in message
...
>>
>> All I have to do is find willing people in, say, 5 lb increments.
>>
>
>Get a duffel bag and fill it with various objects until you can carry it
>upstairs with 200 lbs in it. After that, a 125 lb person should be easy.

I was thinking of about 200 lb as a goal as well. Makes sense.

Tiger Hillside
September 19th 04, 03:19 AM
On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 01:35:07 GMT, "David" >
wrote:

>
>"Tiger Hillside" > wrote in message
...
>> For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
>> 125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs. I know that it is more
>> difficult to carry a life person than a well balanced stable weight. I
>> figure that the general weight training I am doing is the right path,
>> but I am trying to set a weight goal. Does anyone have some idea of
>> how to translate this to, say, a deadlift or curl or something?
>>
>I would say that alignment would be the major issue - your lower back will
>give way no matter how much strength you have in your legs and upper body.
>So if you find a way to sling her over your shoulder then you are most of
>the way there
>
Yeah, I thought of that. A fireman's carry is the easiest, but not
terribly comfortable or elegant.

Proton Soup
September 19th 04, 03:21 AM
On Sat, 18 Sep 2004 21:42:42 -0400, Dally > wrote:

>Kevin J. Coolidge wrote:
>> carry a lighter person up the stairs and work your way up.
>
>Or better yet, carry the 125 person part way, then set her down for a
>moment while you "go tend to an errand", then come back and carry her
>the rest of the way. :-)
>
>I think it's sweet that you want to pretend that you can do it with
>ease, as if it doesn't matter. She'll see through you, of course, but
>it won't matter. Keep trying and eventually you'll be able to. (And
>maybe she'll weigh less in time.)

Appearing at ease may be intended for her benefit, but why not put
safety first instead? What does he do if he loses his balance? He
needs to be able to grab onto handrails (both sides of the stairs) and
not drop her. So some type of sling (like maybe parents use to carry
infants) might not be a bad idea. The last thing you want is two
disabled people.

And then there's the type thing that geekgirl is hinting at, like
those motorized stair rail-climbing chairs that elderly people use.

-----------
Proton Soup

"Homo sapiens non urinat in ventum."

David
September 19th 04, 03:21 AM
"Tiger Hillside" > wrote in message
...
> On 19 Sep 2004 01:54:49 GMT, geek_girl > wrote:
>
> >In > Dally wrote:
> >> geek_girl wrote:
> >>> In > Tiger Hillside wrote:
> >>>
> >>>>For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
> >>>>125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs.
> >>>
> >>> Can't you think of a way to get her upstairs before you give her the
> >>> Rohypnol? Alternatively, you could stay downstairs and do her on the
> >>> couch, but that's just plain tacky.
> >>
> >> That's funny, I guessed a completely different scenario: I'm seeing a
> >> man carrying his disabled wife.
> >
> >Why? If she's permanently disabled, there's all kinds of equipment
> >available that would be much more efficient than him carrying her, and
> >that would allow her to get upstairs by herself if he's not available.
> >And if she's temporarily disabled, it's likely that by the time he's
> >trained enough to do it easily, she'll be better. It just doesn't make
> >sense.
>
> How about if it is a close friend or relative not living with me? Or a
> spouse and the issue is other places, not home? The disabled do leave
> the house on occasion.
>
> >> I interpreted him wanting to do it
> >> with ease not being macho, but wanting to make her not feel guilty
> >> for having him need to do this.
> >
> >Have you ever been disabled, even temporarily? Not wanting to need help
> >has very little to do with guilt or how easy it is for someone to help
> >you.
>
> That, however, is an issue.
>
> >> I suspect I've had better dates than you.
> >
> >I suspect I've had a lot more dates than you.
>
> I suspect that you were not joking with your first post. In which case
> I should either feel insult or sorry for you. Since you don't know me
> at all you really could not have insulted me so your post said more
> about you than me. So I do feel sorry for you.
>
believe me, she was joking.

David
September 19th 04, 03:26 AM
"Tiger Hillside" > wrote in message
...
> On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 01:35:07 GMT, "David" >
> wrote:
>
> >
> >"Tiger Hillside" > wrote in message
> ...
> >> For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
> >> 125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs. I know that it is more
> >> difficult to carry a life person than a well balanced stable weight. I
> >> figure that the general weight training I am doing is the right path,
> >> but I am trying to set a weight goal. Does anyone have some idea of
> >> how to translate this to, say, a deadlift or curl or something?
> >>
> >I would say that alignment would be the major issue - your lower back
will
> >give way no matter how much strength you have in your legs and upper
body.
> >So if you find a way to sling her over your shoulder then you are most of
> >the way there
> >
> Yeah, I thought of that. A fireman's carry is the easiest, but not
> terribly comfortable or elegant.
>
elegance goes out the window when your back gives way and both of collapse
in a heap

Dally
September 19th 04, 03:28 AM
David wrote:

> "Tiger Hillside" > wrote in message

>>I suspect that you were not joking with your first post. In which case
>>I should either feel insult or sorry for you. Since you don't know me
>>at all you really could not have insulted me so your post said more
>>about you than me. So I do feel sorry for you.
>>
>
> believe me, she was joking.

Even I, humor impaired as I am, thought she wasn't seriously thinking
that was your goal.

But... having just read Spodosaurus talking about his disturbingly dim
prospects in the deca and test thread, I was in the mindset of dealing
with rotten luck as elegantly as you can.

Dally

Dally
September 19th 04, 03:28 AM
David wrote:

> "Tiger Hillside" > wrote in message

>>Yeah, I thought of that. A fireman's carry is the easiest, but not
>>terribly comfortable or elegant.
>
> elegance goes out the window when your back gives way and both of collapse
> in a heap

A sense of humor comes in handy then, though.

Dally

geek_girl
September 19th 04, 03:30 AM
In > Tiger Hillside wrote:
> On 19 Sep 2004 01:54:49 GMT, geek_girl > wrote:
>
>>In > Dally wrote:
>>> geek_girl wrote:
>>>> In > Tiger Hillside
>>>> wrote:
>>>>>For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry
>>>>>a 125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs.
>>>>
>>>> Can't you think of a way to get her upstairs before you give her
>>>> the Rohypnol? Alternatively, you could stay downstairs and do her
>>>> on the couch, but that's just plain tacky.
>>>
>>> That's funny, I guessed a completely different scenario: I'm seeing
>>> a man carrying his disabled wife.
>>
>>Why? If she's permanently disabled, there's all kinds of equipment
>>available that would be much more efficient than him carrying her, and
>>that would allow her to get upstairs by herself if he's not available.
>>And if she's temporarily disabled, it's likely that by the time he's
>>trained enough to do it easily, she'll be better. It just doesn't make
>>sense.
>
> How about if it is a close friend or relative not living with me?

So you plan on bringing them to your house and carrying them up your
stairs?

> Or a
> spouse and the issue is other places, not home? The disabled do leave
> the house on occasion.

Yes, so isn't it convenient that so many public buildings have elevators
and wheelchair ramps?

>
>>> I interpreted him wanting to do it
>>> with ease not being macho, but wanting to make her not feel guilty
>>> for having him need to do this.
>>
>>Have you ever been disabled, even temporarily? Not wanting to need
>>help has very little to do with guilt or how easy it is for someone
>>to help you.
>
> That, however, is an issue.

Uhh, yeah. That's why the whole scenario sounded bizarre - AFAIK most
disabled people really don't like being carried on a regular basis.

>>> I suspect I've had better dates than you.
>>
>>I suspect I've had a lot more dates than you.
>
> I suspect that you were not joking with your first post.

It depends on what you mean by "joking".

David
September 19th 04, 03:40 AM
"Dally" > wrote in message
...
> David wrote:
>
> > "Tiger Hillside" > wrote in message
>
> >>Yeah, I thought of that. A fireman's carry is the easiest, but not
> >>terribly comfortable or elegant.
> >
> > elegance goes out the window when your back gives way and both of
collapse
> > in a heap
>
> A sense of humor comes in handy then, though.
>
> Dally

Dally, I for one would find it impossible to contain myself - in fact am
laughing already just at the prospect

Dally
September 19th 04, 03:46 AM
David wrote:

> "Dally" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>>David wrote:
>>
>>
>>>"Tiger Hillside" > wrote in message
>>
>>>>Yeah, I thought of that. A fireman's carry is the easiest, but not
>>>>terribly comfortable or elegant.
>>>
>>>elegance goes out the window when your back gives way and both of
>
> collapse
>
>>>in a heap
>>
>>A sense of humor comes in handy then, though.
>>
>>Dally
>
>
> Dally, I for one would find it impossible to contain myself - in fact am
> laughing already just at the prospect

Well, I'm not *suggesting* you fling crippled people about for fun. :-)
But if it happens, well, you may as well laugh about it.

Dally

Brandon Berg
September 19th 04, 04:22 AM
"Dally" > wrote in message
...
> Well, I'm not *suggesting* you fling crippled people about for fun...

But when you're out of able-bodied dwarves, you just have to make do with
what you've got.

John M. Williams
September 19th 04, 05:03 AM
geek_girl > wrote:
> Tiger Hillside wrote:
>> geek_girl > wrote:
>>> Dally wrote:
>>>>
>>>> I interpreted him wanting to do it
>>>> with ease not being macho, but wanting to make her not feel guilty
>>>> for having him need to do this.
>>>
>>>Have you ever been disabled, even temporarily? Not wanting to need
>>>help has very little to do with guilt or how easy it is for someone
>>>to help you.
>>
>> That, however, is an issue.
>
>Uhh, yeah. That's why the whole scenario sounded bizarre - AFAIK most
>disabled people really don't like being carried on a regular basis.

I suspect this is more about him than about her.

Proton Soup
September 19th 04, 05:14 AM
On Sat, 18 Sep 2004 20:22:30 -0700, "Brandon Berg" >
wrote:

>
>"Dally" > wrote in message
...
>> Well, I'm not *suggesting* you fling crippled people about for fun...
>
>But when you're out of able-bodied dwarves, you just have to make do with
>what you've got.

How do you think they got that way you insensitive *******?

-----------
Proton Soup

"Homo sapiens non urinat in ventum."

David
September 19th 04, 06:10 AM
"Brandon Berg" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Dally" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Well, I'm not *suggesting* you fling crippled people about for fun...
>
> But when you're out of able-bodied dwarves, you just have to make do with
> what you've got.
>
99 people here will find that funny
1 person here will take offense

Brandon Berg
September 19th 04, 06:54 AM
"David" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Brandon Berg" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Dally" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> > Well, I'm not *suggesting* you fling crippled people about for fun...
>>
>> But when you're out of able-bodied dwarves, you just have to make do with
>> what you've got.
>
> 99 people here will find that funny
> 1 person here will take offense

Quite possibly. Fortunately, the person offended will be neither a dwarf nor
a cripple, but some samely-abled busybody of average height whose only
source of joy in life is taking vicarious offense. So really, everybody
wins.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/2285348.stm
http://www.shortsupport.org/News/0361.html

--
Brandon Berg
Fix the obvious homonym substitution to reply.

David
September 19th 04, 06:58 AM
"Brandon Berg" > wrote in message
...
>
> "David" > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> > "Brandon Berg" > wrote in message
> > ...
> >>
> >> "Dally" > wrote in message
> >> ...
> >> > Well, I'm not *suggesting* you fling crippled people about for fun...
> >>
> >> But when you're out of able-bodied dwarves, you just have to make do
with
> >> what you've got.
> >
> > 99 people here will find that funny
> > 1 person here will take offense
>
> Quite possibly. Fortunately, the person offended will be neither a dwarf
nor
> a cripple, but some samely-abled busybody of average height whose only
> source of joy in life is taking vicarious offense. So really, everybody
> wins.
>
> http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/2285348.stm
> http://www.shortsupport.org/News/0361.html
>
> --
> Brandon Berg
> Fix the obvious homonym substitution to reply.
>
Good links. I suppose as long as you are not throwing around crippled
dwarfs there can;t be too much wrong with it

Mistress Krista
September 19th 04, 11:35 AM
"Tiger Hillside" > wrote in message
...
> For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
> 125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs. I know that it is more
> difficult to carry a life person than a well balanced stable weight. I
> figure that the general weight training I am doing is the right path,
> but I am trying to set a weight goal. Does anyone have some idea of
> how to translate this to, say, a deadlift or curl or something?
>
>

Can't really say how it will transfer numerically, because the movements are
rather different. What you have are three components:

-picking up (getting the weight up and into position)
-carrying (in part an isometric hold, stabilizing an awkward weight while
moving thru space)
-putting down (an underrated part of any lift!)

#1 job is to buy yourself a sandbag. Army surplus duffel bag + bag of
carpenter's sand = $15-20 and a good investment. Personally I'd start with a
lighter bag of sand but I don't know how big you are relative to the 125 lb
person. Then I would practice with that sandbag, with two main exercises:
picking up/putting down, and carrying. Picking up/putting down, IMHO,
should be practiced quite a bit, as this is the part where you could really
do yourself some harm if you weren't careful. Sets of 5-8 pickups/putdowns
should also get the heart rate going nicely if the bag is sufficiently
heavy.

Then I would do the carry for distance over level ground as well as up
stairs. I might even get two sandbags: a heavier one for pickups/carry plus
a lighter one for weighted exercises such as a squat + press combo.

If I had to choose a transfer to regular weights exercise I would choose
things like the deadlift, one-hand press, bent-over rows, weighted stepups,
curls and perhaps even an isometric curl hold (depending on how you plan to
carry) and weighted twisting abdominal work such as woodchops.


Krista

--
http://www.stumptuous.com/weights.html
http://www.trans-health.com
mistresskrista at stumptuous dot com

Lordy
September 19th 04, 01:19 PM
Tiger Hillside > wrote in
:

> Sorry, it was the weight amount I was wondering. That is, how much
> deadlift seems like 125 lb of person up stairs? How much curl?

Curl is not going to help you much if at all.

Going up stairs will be harder than simply doing reps. Esp if we are
talking about a flight of 15-20 steps.

There are also different ways to carry -

piggyback - more leg strength
firemans lift - legs and upperbody

Also how much do you weigh? From original question and mentioning curls,
I'm assuming you are fairly untrained?


--
Lordy

Lee Michaels
September 19th 04, 02:30 PM
"Mistress Krista" wrote...
>
> "Tiger Hillside" > wrote in message
> ...
> > For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
> > 125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs. I know that it is more
> > difficult to carry a life person than a well balanced stable weight. I
> > figure that the general weight training I am doing is the right path,
> > but I am trying to set a weight goal. Does anyone have some idea of
> > how to translate this to, say, a deadlift or curl or something?
> >
> >
>
> Can't really say how it will transfer numerically, because the movements
are
> rather different. What you have are three components:
>
> -picking up (getting the weight up and into position)
> -carrying (in part an isometric hold, stabilizing an awkward weight while
> moving thru space)
> -putting down (an underrated part of any lift!)
>
> #1 job is to buy yourself a sandbag. Army surplus duffel bag + bag of
> carpenter's sand = $15-20 and a good investment. Personally I'd start with
a
> lighter bag of sand but I don't know how big you are relative to the 125
lb
> person. Then I would practice with that sandbag, with two main exercises:
> picking up/putting down, and carrying. Picking up/putting down, IMHO,
> should be practiced quite a bit, as this is the part where you could
really
> do yourself some harm if you weren't careful. Sets of 5-8
pickups/putdowns
> should also get the heart rate going nicely if the bag is sufficiently
> heavy.
>
> Then I would do the carry for distance over level ground as well as up
> stairs. I might even get two sandbags: a heavier one for pickups/carry
plus
> a lighter one for weighted exercises such as a squat + press combo.
>
> If I had to choose a transfer to regular weights exercise I would choose
> things like the deadlift, one-hand press, bent-over rows, weighted
stepups,
> curls and perhaps even an isometric curl hold (depending on how you plan
to
> carry) and weighted twisting abdominal work such as woodchops.
>
>
All this sage adivice involving sandbags, etc.

Why doesn't he just use a dead body?

That would give him some kind of similar resistance.

And if it was dead, ti wouldn't bitch and complain either.

HTH

Dally
September 19th 04, 03:10 PM
Lee Michaels wrote:

> All this sage adivice involving sandbags, etc.
>
> Why doesn't he just use a dead body?

IMO, it wouldn't be nearly as hilarious as flinging cripples. Too messy.

Dally, always practical about messes

Dally
September 19th 04, 03:10 PM
David wrote:

> "Brandon Berg" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>>"Dally" > wrote in message
...
>>
>>>Well, I'm not *suggesting* you fling crippled people about for fun...
>>
>>But when you're out of able-bodied dwarves, you just have to make do with
>>what you've got.
>>
>
> 99 people here will find that funny
> 1 person here will take offense

Proton Soup gamely stepped up to the plate to be offended, so the rest
of us can find it funny. (Thanks, PS.)

Dally

Mistress Krista
September 19th 04, 04:08 PM
"Dally" > wrote in message
...
> Lee Michaels wrote:
>
> > All this sage adivice involving sandbags, etc.
> >
> > Why doesn't he just use a dead body?
>
> IMO, it wouldn't be nearly as hilarious as flinging cripples. Too messy.
>


Nonsense. With a few contractor garbage bags and a bit of duct tape, the
sensible corpse-dragging homemaker can ensure that her carpet stays pristine
even as she is flinging the stiffs. The problem is really one of
progressive resistance. If you have a series of corpses that are about the
same weight, perhaps chop a few up so that you can have body bags of varying
mass, thus enabling many options for varying intensity and workload.
Personally I recommend a compound mitre saw for this so that you can get
some nice clean cuts at the appropriate angle, although with a fat corpse, a
chainsaw might be a better choice as the blade tends to catch with larger
diameters. Be sure to wipe down blades between cuts, and scrub blades with a
solution of baking soda and lemon juice when finished, to deodorize and keep
the meat-hacking apparatus sparkling. Tie different coloured ribbons and
perhaps a nice engraved tag around the bags to remember which is which!


Martha

--
http://www.stumptuous.com/weights.html
http://www.trans-health.com
mistresskrista at stumptuous dot com

MJL
September 19th 04, 07:47 PM
On Sat, 18 Sep 2004 23:40:56 GMT, Tiger Hillside
> wrote:

>For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
>125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs. I know that it is more
>difficult to carry a life person than a well balanced stable weight. I
>figure that the general weight training I am doing is the right path,
>but I am trying to set a weight goal. Does anyone have some idea of
>how to translate this to, say, a deadlift or curl or something?
>

125 lbs is not a lot of weight for a reasonably fit man to carry.
You're problem won't be carrying the weight, it will be getting so
fatigued that you trip or simply can't continue in the time allotted.
Toward that end I'd think some pretty intense cardiovascular training
is called for.


--
http://www.texansfortruth.org/

MJL
September 19th 04, 07:50 PM
On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 01:02:04 GMT, Tiger Hillside
> wrote:

>On 19 Sep 2004 00:10:37 GMT, geek_girl > wrote:
>
>>In > Tiger Hillside wrote:
>>> For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
>>> 125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs.
>>
>>Can't you think of a way to get her upstairs before you give her the
>>Rohypnol? Alternatively, you could stay downstairs and do her on the
>>couch, but that's just plain tacky.
>>
>>> I know that it is more
>>> difficult to carry a life person than a well balanced stable weight.
>>
>>Not if the person is conscious and *wants* to be carried. In that case
>>it's much easier than carrying dead weight. Even I could carry a willing
>>125 lb person up a flight of stairs.
>
>She is will, but medically it is difficult. She should be able to hold
>on but now with her legs. And I want to be able to do this with ease,
>as thought it did not matter.
>

So you'll be doing this regularly? Dood, your legs are gonna git
hyooge!


--
http://www.texansfortruth.org/

MJL
September 19th 04, 07:51 PM
On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 02:19:03 GMT, Tiger Hillside
> wrote:

>On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 01:35:07 GMT, "David" >
>wrote:
>
>>
>>"Tiger Hillside" > wrote in message
...
>>> For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
>>> 125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs. I know that it is more
>>> difficult to carry a life person than a well balanced stable weight. I
>>> figure that the general weight training I am doing is the right path,
>>> but I am trying to set a weight goal. Does anyone have some idea of
>>> how to translate this to, say, a deadlift or curl or something?
>>>
>>I would say that alignment would be the major issue - your lower back will
>>give way no matter how much strength you have in your legs and upper body.
>>So if you find a way to sling her over your shoulder then you are most of
>>the way there
>>
>Yeah, I thought of that. A fireman's carry is the easiest, but not
>terribly comfortable or elegant.
>

You're going to have a human being on you in a VERY precarious
situation. Please don't discount the risk of both of you falling down
an entire flight of stairs. Use the safest method...


--
http://www.texansfortruth.org/

Proton Soup
September 19th 04, 08:46 PM
On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 10:10:43 -0400, Dally > wrote:

>David wrote:
>
>> "Brandon Berg" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>
>>>"Dally" > wrote in message
...
>>>
>>>>Well, I'm not *suggesting* you fling crippled people about for fun...
>>>
>>>But when you're out of able-bodied dwarves, you just have to make do with
>>>what you've got.
>>>
>>
>> 99 people here will find that funny
>> 1 person here will take offense
>
>Proton Soup gamely stepped up to the plate to be offended, so the rest
>of us can find it funny. (Thanks, PS.)

You're welcome. I do what I can.

-----------
Proton Soup

"Homo sapiens non urinat in ventum."

Brandon Berg
September 19th 04, 10:01 PM
"Proton Soup" > wrote in message
...
> On Sat, 18 Sep 2004 20:22:30 -0700, "Brandon Berg" >
> wrote:
>>"Dally" > wrote in message
...
>>> Well, I'm not *suggesting* you fling crippled people about for fun...
>>
>>But when you're out of able-bodied dwarves, you just have to make do with
>>what you've got.
>
> How do you think they got that way you insensitive *******?

I don't know...diving accidents?

Proton Soup
September 19th 04, 11:02 PM
On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 14:01:17 -0700, "Brandon Berg" >
wrote:

>"Proton Soup" > wrote in message
...
>> On Sat, 18 Sep 2004 20:22:30 -0700, "Brandon Berg" >
>> wrote:
>>>"Dally" > wrote in message
...
>>>> Well, I'm not *suggesting* you fling crippled people about for fun...
>>>
>>>But when you're out of able-bodied dwarves, you just have to make do with
>>>what you've got.
>>
>> How do you think they got that way you insensitive *******?
>
>I don't know...diving accidents?

Not likely. The horse usually hits the water first. But when they do
land dwarf-first, it's a bloody damn sight indeed.

-----------
Proton Soup

"Homo sapiens non urinat in ventum."

David Cohen
September 19th 04, 11:15 PM
"Proton Soup" > wrote
> "Brandon Berg" > wrote:
> >"Proton Soup" > wrote
> >> "Brandon Berg" > wrote:
> >>>"Dally" > wrote
> >>>> Well, I'm not *suggesting* you fling crippled people about for fun...
> >>>
> >>>But when you're out of able-bodied dwarves, you just have to make do
with
> >>>what you've got.
> >>
> >> How do you think they got that way you insensitive *******?
> >
> >I don't know...diving accidents?
>
> Not likely. The horse usually hits the water first. But when they do
> land dwarf-first, it's a bloody damn sight indeed.

It is well known that if you drop a cat from a reasonable height, it will
land feet first. It is also well known that a slice of bread with peanut
butter on it will, if dropped, land peanut butter side down.

So, what happens if you strap a slice of bread with peanut butter on the
back of a cat, and drop it?

David

Proton Soup
September 19th 04, 11:54 PM
On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 22:15:18 GMT, "David Cohen"
> wrote:

>
>"Proton Soup" > wrote
>> "Brandon Berg" > wrote:
>> >"Proton Soup" > wrote
>> >> "Brandon Berg" > wrote:
>> >>>"Dally" > wrote
>> >>>> Well, I'm not *suggesting* you fling crippled people about for fun...
>> >>>
>> >>>But when you're out of able-bodied dwarves, you just have to make do
>with
>> >>>what you've got.
>> >>
>> >> How do you think they got that way you insensitive *******?
>> >
>> >I don't know...diving accidents?
>>
>> Not likely. The horse usually hits the water first. But when they do
>> land dwarf-first, it's a bloody damn sight indeed.
>
>It is well known that if you drop a cat from a reasonable height, it will
>land feet first. It is also well known that a slice of bread with peanut
>butter on it will, if dropped, land peanut butter side down.
>
>So, what happens if you strap a slice of bread with peanut butter on the
>back of a cat, and drop it?

I don't know, but it surely must involve some tangled quantum states.
Probably, both states occur superimposed.

Or maybe it would levatate and spin above the floor. Hmm.

-----------
Proton Soup

"Homo sapiens non urinat in ventum."

Lash Rambo
September 20th 04, 06:11 AM
"David Cohen" > wrote in
et:

>
> "Proton Soup" > wrote
>> "Brandon Berg" > wrote:
>> >"Proton Soup" > wrote
>> >> "Brandon Berg" > wrote:
>> >>>"Dally" > wrote
>> >>>> Well, I'm not *suggesting* you fling crippled people about for
>> >>>> fun...
>> >>>
>> >>>But when you're out of able-bodied dwarves, you just have to make
>> >>>do
> with
>> >>>what you've got.
>> >>
>> >> How do you think they got that way you insensitive *******?
>> >
>> >I don't know...diving accidents?
>>
>> Not likely. The horse usually hits the water first. But when they
>> do land dwarf-first, it's a bloody damn sight indeed.
>
> It is well known that if you drop a cat from a reasonable height, it
> will land feet first. It is also well known that a slice of bread with
> peanut butter on it will, if dropped, land peanut butter side down.
>
> So, what happens if you strap a slice of bread with peanut butter on
> the back of a cat, and drop it?

Simple. The cat flails about madly, catching your leg with the claws of
one of its forepaws. It then swings around, latching the claws of its
other forepaw in your groin. This will have unsettled the bread, which
will fall, landing with the peanut butter facing up. Finally, your flesh
will give way, and the cat will fall and land upon the bread, back-first.

Whether you then proceed to eat the peanut butter and cat sandwich is a
question that modern physics sadly cannot answer.

> David

Al
September 20th 04, 06:26 AM
Lash Rambo wrote:


> Simple. The cat flails about madly, catching your leg with the
> claws of one of its forepaws. It then swings around, latching the
> claws of its other forepaw in your groin.

You must be talking about 'Pinky'

http://www.digitalfog.com/gallery/pinky.htm

--
Al

TimR
September 20th 04, 11:46 AM
MJL > wrote in message >...
> On Sat, 18 Sep 2004 23:40:56 GMT, Tiger Hillside
> > wrote:
>
> >For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
> >125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs. I know that it is more
> >difficult to carry a life person than a well balanced stable weight. I
> >figure that the general weight training I am doing is the right path,
> >but I am trying to set a weight goal. Does anyone have some idea of
> >how to translate this to, say, a deadlift or curl or something?
> >
>
> 125 lbs is not a lot of weight for a reasonably fit man to carry.
> You're problem won't be carrying the weight, it will be getting so
> fatigued that you trip or simply can't continue in the time allotted.
> Toward that end I'd think some pretty intense cardiovascular training
> is called for.

Man is a tool user. So my first thought was, wheelbarrow.

However, the crash could be awkward.

The best carry is obviously Estonian Wife Carrying position. It is
far safer because you have your hands free to balance yourself and
prevent any kind of a fall. In the competitions they cross obstacles,
ponds, etc. It's much better than that movie "in your arms" position,
which is very unstable; and better than fireman's carry (too wide for
many stairways, center of gravity too high, and too easy to bump the
victim's head.) It's actually fairly comfortable for both
participants. Depending on the handicap, though, I'm not sure how
easy it is for you to get into it.

Tiger Hillside
September 20th 04, 12:31 PM
On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 13:30:12 GMT, "Lee Michaels"
> wrote:

[snip]


>All this sage adivice involving sandbags, etc.
>
>Why doesn't he just use a dead body?
>
>That would give him some kind of similar resistance.
>
>And if it was dead, ti wouldn't bitch and complain either.
>
>HTH

It was my understanding that one of the issues of carrying people was
that they move. If you think a dead body would do the job then we have
solved the original problem. (That I now have a new problem is
obvious, but I am sure there is a newsgroup appropriate for finding a
supply of appropriate sized dead bodies.)

Richard Smith
September 20th 04, 01:55 PM
"Proton Soup" > wrote in message
...
> On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 22:15:18 GMT, "David Cohen"
> > wrote:
>
> >
> >"Proton Soup" > wrote
> >> "Brandon Berg" > wrote:
> >> >"Proton Soup" > wrote
> >> >> "Brandon Berg" > wrote:
> >> >>>"Dally" > wrote
> >> >>>> Well, I'm not *suggesting* you fling crippled people about for
fun...
> >> >>>
> >> >>>But when you're out of able-bodied dwarves, you just have to make do
> >with
> >> >>>what you've got.
> >> >>
> >> >> How do you think they got that way you insensitive *******?
> >> >
> >> >I don't know...diving accidents?
> >>
> >> Not likely. The horse usually hits the water first. But when they do
> >> land dwarf-first, it's a bloody damn sight indeed.
> >
> >It is well known that if you drop a cat from a reasonable height, it will
> >land feet first. It is also well known that a slice of bread with peanut
> >butter on it will, if dropped, land peanut butter side down.
> >
> >So, what happens if you strap a slice of bread with peanut butter on the
> >back of a cat, and drop it?
>
> I don't know, but it surely must involve some tangled quantum states.
> Probably, both states occur superimposed.
>
> Or maybe it would levatate and spin above the floor. Hmm.
>
> -----------
> Proton Soup

Do you suppose that may be what was found at the Roswell crash in '47?

Several cats w/PB on their backs spinning above the desert. Wonder if they
may have used some kind of magnetic "bottle" to contain the cats...and
possibly the plasma created as the rate of spin increases.

Richard
>
> "Homo sapiens non urinat in ventum."

bc
September 20th 04, 04:06 PM
Proton Soup > wrote in message >...
> On 19 Sep 2004 00:10:37 GMT, geek_girl > wrote:
>
> >In > Tiger Hillside wrote:
> >> For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
> >> 125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs.
> >
> >Can't you think of a way to get her upstairs before you give her the
> >Rohypnol? Alternatively, you could stay downstairs and do her on the
> >couch, but that's just plain tacky.
> >
> >> I know that it is more
> >> difficult to carry a life person than a well balanced stable weight.
> >
> >Not if the person is conscious and *wants* to be carried. In that case
> >it's much easier than carrying dead weight. Even I could carry a willing
> >125 lb person up a flight of stairs.
>
> Yeah, I's thinking the same thing. If she wraps her arms and legs
> around you to hold on, then it's mostly a leg exercise, with a bit of
> work on the back, too, to keep it erect.

Erect? He didn't say anything about stoinking while going up the
stairs. It would involve plenty of hip and ab work if that were the
case. Of course, if it's only a flight or two, it must just be for a
quickie.

- bc

Dally
September 20th 04, 06:27 PM
Mistress Krista wrote:

> "Dally" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>>Lee Michaels wrote:
>>
>>
>>>All this sage adivice involving sandbags, etc.
>>>
>>>Why doesn't he just use a dead body?
>>
>>IMO, it wouldn't be nearly as hilarious as flinging cripples. Too messy.

> Nonsense. With a few contractor garbage bags and a bit of duct tape, the
> sensible corpse-dragging homemaker can ensure that her carpet stays pristine
> even as she is flinging the stiffs. The problem is really one of
> progressive resistance. If you have a series of corpses that are about the
> same weight, perhaps chop a few up so that you can have body bags of varying
> mass, thus enabling many options for varying intensity and workload.
> Personally I recommend a compound mitre saw for this so that you can get
> some nice clean cuts at the appropriate angle, although with a fat corpse, a
> chainsaw might be a better choice as the blade tends to catch with larger
> diameters. Be sure to wipe down blades between cuts, and scrub blades with a
> solution of baking soda and lemon juice when finished, to deodorize and keep
> the meat-hacking apparatus sparkling. Tie different coloured ribbons and
> perhaps a nice engraved tag around the bags to remember which is which!
>
>
> Martha

I love the way you consistently support training goals with an eye
towards a woman's perspective. Thanks again!

-- Dally

Lash Rambo
September 20th 04, 07:31 PM
"Al" > wrote in news:[email protected]:

> Lash Rambo wrote:
>
>> Simple. The cat flails about madly, catching your leg with the
>> claws of one of its forepaws. It then swings around, latching the
>> claws of its other forepaw in your groin.
>
> You must be talking about 'Pinky'
>
> http://www.digitalfog.com/gallery/pinky.htm

YES! That's exactly what I was envisioning! Pinky gets an A+.

Justin Case
September 20th 04, 08:29 PM
On Mon, 20 Sep 2004 18:31:10 GMT, Lash Rambo > wrote:

>"Al" > wrote in news:[email protected]:
>
>> Lash Rambo wrote:
>>
>>> Simple. The cat flails about madly, catching your leg with the
>>> claws of one of its forepaws. It then swings around, latching the
>>> claws of its other forepaw in your groin.
>>
>> You must be talking about 'Pinky'
>>
>> http://www.digitalfog.com/gallery/pinky.htm
>
>YES! That's exactly what I was envisioning! Pinky gets an A+.

Too funny! The last thing the handler said about the cat was "He's a
very loving cat." Yeah. This is the new ad.
http://www.ebaumsworld.com/freecat.html

Tiger Hillside
September 20th 04, 10:11 PM
On 20 Sep 2004 03:46:35 -0700, (TimR) wrote:

>MJL > wrote in message >...
>> On Sat, 18 Sep 2004 23:40:56 GMT, Tiger Hillside
>> > wrote:
>>
>> >For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
>> >125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs. I know that it is more
>> >difficult to carry a life person than a well balanced stable weight. I
>> >figure that the general weight training I am doing is the right path,
>> >but I am trying to set a weight goal. Does anyone have some idea of
>> >how to translate this to, say, a deadlift or curl or something?
>> >
>>
>> 125 lbs is not a lot of weight for a reasonably fit man to carry.
>> You're problem won't be carrying the weight, it will be getting so
>> fatigued that you trip or simply can't continue in the time allotted.
>> Toward that end I'd think some pretty intense cardiovascular training
>> is called for.
>
>Man is a tool user. So my first thought was, wheelbarrow.
>
>However, the crash could be awkward.
>
>The best carry is obviously Estonian Wife Carrying position. It is
>far safer because you have your hands free to balance yourself and
>prevent any kind of a fall. In the competitions they cross obstacles,
>ponds, etc. It's much better than that movie "in your arms" position,
>which is very unstable; and better than fireman's carry (too wide for
>many stairways, center of gravity too high, and too easy to bump the
>victim's head.) It's actually fairly comfortable for both
>participants. Depending on the handicap, though, I'm not sure how
>easy it is for you to get into it.

Zow! I can't wait until I can use the phrase Estonian Wife Carrying
Position in a conversation. And then mention that there is a wife
carrying competition. That is almost as good as Bulls and Swimming
Pools. Unfortunately the person in question's handicap makes that
impossible. Now my wife, OTOH, ...

bc
September 20th 04, 11:07 PM
Proton Soup > wrote in message >...
> On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 10:10:43 -0400, Dally > wrote:
>
> >David wrote:
> >
> >> "Brandon Berg" > wrote in message
> >> ...
> >>
> >>>"Dally" > wrote in message
> ...
> >>>
> >>>>Well, I'm not *suggesting* you fling crippled people about for fun...
> >>>
> >>>But when you're out of able-bodied dwarves, you just have to make do with
> >>>what you've got.
> >>>
> >>
> >> 99 people here will find that funny
> >> 1 person here will take offense
> >
> >Proton Soup gamely stepped up to the plate to be offended, so the rest
> >of us can find it funny. (Thanks, PS.)
>
> You're welcome. I do what I can.
>

Well, I laughed my ass off. Pinky is my hero. I mean, didn't this
guy, who seems to be connected with an animal husbandry effort of some
kind, notice how Pinky was getting increasingly miffed at all that
holding and scratching under the chin that he was receiving? Any self
respecting cat would have carved a chunk out of him. And the leash?

- bc

TheTortoise
September 21st 04, 12:32 AM
Tiger Hillside wrote:
> For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
> 125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs. I know that it is more
> difficult to carry a life person than a well balanced stable weight.
I
> figure that the general weight training I am doing is the right path,
> but I am trying to set a weight goal. Does anyone have some idea of
> how to translate this to, say, a deadlift or curl or something?

Perhaps the old sailor's trick might work for you.

1. Buy yourself a very small calf.
2. Every day, put the calf on your shoulders and carry it up the
stairs.
3. After a year or two (how long does it take?) you'll be carrying a
full grown cow!

:?P

Tiger Hillside
September 21st 04, 12:46 AM
On 20 Sep 2004 16:32:59 -0700, "TheTortoise" >
wrote:

>
>Tiger Hillside wrote:
>> For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
>> 125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs. I know that it is more
>> difficult to carry a life person than a well balanced stable weight.
>I
>> figure that the general weight training I am doing is the right path,
>> but I am trying to set a weight goal. Does anyone have some idea of
>> how to translate this to, say, a deadlift or curl or something?
>
>Perhaps the old sailor's trick might work for you.
>
>1. Buy yourself a very small calf.
>2. Every day, put the calf on your shoulders and carry it up the
>stairs.
>3. After a year or two (how long does it take?) you'll be carrying a
>full grown cow!

Again, this does solve the problem. It now leaves me with the problem
of where to keep the cow when not carrying it up and down the stairs.
Perhaps if I start with a really small cow I can keep it in a
backpack. And then just keep getting larger and larger backpacks.

TimR
September 21st 04, 06:56 AM
Tiger Hillside > wrote in message >...
> On 20 Sep 2004 16:32:59 -0700, "TheTortoise" >
> wrote:
>
> >
> >Tiger Hillside wrote:
> >> For personal reasons I want to be able to easily pick up and carry a
> >> 125 lb person up a flight or two of stairs. I know that it is more
> >> difficult to carry a life person than a well balanced stable weight.
> I
> >> figure that the general weight training I am doing is the right path,
> >> but I am trying to set a weight goal. Does anyone have some idea of
> >> how to translate this to, say, a deadlift or curl or something?
> >
> >Perhaps the old sailor's trick might work for you.
> >


The wife carrying competition is done every year, in Finland I think.

The prize is your wife's weight in beer. This makes for an
interesting optimization problem. Do you want your wife skinny, to
increase your chances of winning? Or "less skinny" to increase the
size of the prize?

I don't know how the contestants get into position. With my kids I do
it by bending at the waist, letting them climb on from the front, and
straightening. They weigh 110 and 120 (teenagers). I'm not sure I
could do it this way with anyone much heavier. Once in position it is
fairly comfortable and I can easily go up stairs. I weigh about 175,
I'm in fair shape for a guy in his 50's but not a powerlifter by any
means.

The sailor's trick doesn't work. They tried it at Iowa State one year
with a lineman from the football team and a calf from the agriculture
department. Calves grow faster than you realize, he couldn't keep up
even for one semester.