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View Full Version : Omega-3 in Grass Fed Beef?


Swann
September 25th 04, 05:49 AM
I'm trying to avoid relying on flax oil as my primary source of
omega-3's. That said, how would one go about determining the amount
of omega-3 in grass-fed beef? Is there a source of information that
provides accurate
nutritional information, like the USDA does for all other types of
beef? Is there a ratio I can use to come up with a rough estimate?

Thanks,
Swann

Wayne S. Hill
September 25th 04, 03:22 PM
Swann wrote:

> I'm trying to avoid relying on flax oil as my primary source
> of omega-3's. That said, how would one go about determining
> the amount of omega-3 in grass-fed beef? Is there a source
> of information that provides accurate nutritional information,
> like the USDA does for all other types of beef? Is there a
> ratio I can use to come up with a rough estimate?

You might take a look here:

http://www.eatwild.com

They indicate that it's something like 70 mg/100 grams of meat,
with a 2:1 n-6:n-3 ratio. They say their source is G.J. Miller,
"Lipids in Wild Ruminant Animals and Steers." J. of Food
Quality, 9:331-343, 1986.

--
-Wayne

David R. Throop
October 16th 04, 08:04 PM
In article >,
Wayne S. Hill > wrote:
>Swann wrote:
>

>> That said, how would one go about determining
>> the amount of omega-3 in grass-fed beef?

>They indicate that it's something like 70 mg/100 grams of meat,
>with a 2:1 n-6:n-3 ratio. They say their source is G.J. Miller,
>"Lipids in Wild Ruminant Animals and Steers." J. of Food
>Quality, 9:331-343, 1986.

Mmmm. I'd be cautious about extrapolating from wild animals to
domesticated ones, even if they're grass fed. Domestic animals still
have a much higher body fat fraction than the wild ones do.

How do you feel about fish? Canned salmon, mackerel, sardines are
cheap and delicious, have very high omega-3 content.

David Throop

Axel of the North!
October 17th 04, 03:32 AM
On 16 Oct 2004 14:04:35 -0500, (David R. Throop)
wrote:

>In article >,
>Wayne S. Hill > wrote:
>>Swann wrote:
>>
>
>>> That said, how would one go about determining
>>> the amount of omega-3 in grass-fed beef?
>
>>They indicate that it's something like 70 mg/100 grams of meat,
>>with a 2:1 n-6:n-3 ratio. They say their source is G.J. Miller,
>>"Lipids in Wild Ruminant Animals and Steers." J. of Food
>>Quality, 9:331-343, 1986.
>
>Mmmm. I'd be cautious about extrapolating from wild animals to
>domesticated ones, even if they're grass fed. Domestic animals still
>have a much higher body fat fraction than the wild ones do.
>
>How do you feel about fish? Canned salmon, mackerel, sardines are
>cheap and delicious, have very high omega-3 content.
>
>David Throop
>

yes. you WANT more fat, the lean cuts aren't the best meals. what it
eats is what matters, not whether or not it is out in the wild vs.
controlled by humans.

z_bumbi
October 17th 04, 09:56 AM
(Axel of the North!) wrote in message >...
> what it
> eats is what matters, not whether or not it is out in the wild vs.
> controlled by humans.


The type of animal does mater and last time I was in the wild I didnīt
see any cows breeded to give as much meat as possibly, the amount of
exercise that the animal do also have an impact on the quality of the
meat.

Bjorn

James Stein
October 17th 04, 05:07 PM
"z_bumbi" > wrote in message
om...
> (Axel of the North!) wrote in message
> >...
>> what it
>> eats is what matters, not whether or not it is out in the wild vs.
>> controlled by humans.
>
>
> The type of animal does mater and last time I was in the wild I didnīt
> see any cows breeded to give as much meat as possibly, the amount of
> exercise that the animal do also have an impact on the quality of the
> meat.

Not to mention that non-free-range meat is kept in cages and fed *humongous*
amounts of antibiotics. Even free-range meat is fed large quantities of
antibio's these days, but those in cages are fed far more, due to their
close quarters, large numbers, and lack of mobility resulting in 'bed sore'
type infectios.

Axel of the North!
October 18th 04, 03:46 AM
On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 16:07:41 GMT, "James Stein"
> wrote:
>
>"z_bumbi" > wrote in message
om...
>> (Axel of the North!) wrote in message
>> >...
>>> what it
>>> eats is what matters, not whether or not it is out in the wild vs.
>>> controlled by humans.
>>
>>
>> The type of animal does mater and last time I was in the wild I didnīt
>> see any cows breeded to give as much meat as possibly, the amount of
>> exercise that the animal do also have an impact on the quality of the
>> meat.
>
>Not to mention that non-free-range meat is kept in cages and fed *humongous*
>amounts of antibiotics. Even free-range meat is fed large quantities of
>antibio's these days, but those in cages are fed far more, due to their
>close quarters, large numbers, and lack of mobility resulting in 'bed sore'
>type infectios.
>

alright... but doesn't it make sense that grass-fed animals are... not
penned up because they are walking around when they are EATING THE
GRASS??? oh, no, wait, i guess i forgot!

how silly of me!!!

i forgot about the giant treaded robot with the many white-gloved
robotic arms that picked up all the cows and mechanically ran them
over the ground, thus eliminating the bovine's need to walk while it
eats the food that makes it grow (thus enabling the animal to bulk up
easier, increasing net profits!).

thanks, guys. i really needed that fresh dose of reality...

James Stein
October 18th 04, 04:32 AM
"Axel of the North!" > wrote in message
...
> On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 16:07:41 GMT, "James Stein"
> > wrote:
>>
>>"z_bumbi" > wrote in message
om...
>>> (Axel of the North!) wrote in message
>>> >...
>>>> what it
>>>> eats is what matters, not whether or not it is out in the wild vs.
>>>> controlled by humans.
>>>
>>>
>>> The type of animal does mater and last time I was in the wild I didnīt
>>> see any cows breeded to give as much meat as possibly, the amount of
>>> exercise that the animal do also have an impact on the quality of the
>>> meat.
>>
>>Not to mention that non-free-range meat is kept in cages and fed
>>*humongous*
>>amounts of antibiotics. Even free-range meat is fed large quantities of
>>antibio's these days, but those in cages are fed far more, due to their
>>close quarters, large numbers, and lack of mobility resulting in 'bed
>>sore'
>>type infectios.
>>
>
> alright... but doesn't it make sense that grass-fed animals are... not
> penned up because they are walking around when they are EATING THE
> GRASS??? oh, no, wait, i guess i forgot!
>
> how silly of me!!!
>
> i forgot about the giant treaded robot with the many white-gloved
> robotic arms that picked up all the cows and mechanically ran them
> over the ground, thus eliminating the bovine's need to walk while it
> eats the food that makes it grow (thus enabling the animal to bulk up
> easier, increasing net profits!).
>
> thanks, guys. i really needed that fresh dose of reality...

I.

See that? It's a capital letter.

Also: .
It's a period. A cousin to the exclamation point it is, in fact, just as
effective at ending a sentence.

Now then, to address your comments; I never commented on the relationship of
"free range" to "grass-eating." Now, surely, one could *stretch* their
imagine to it's utmost and think that perhaps one could pen an animal and
*bring* it grass; much in the same way that a penned animal would be brought
*any* sort of food, since regardless of what food you use an example, the
bovine in question will not be moving to it.

Your comment regarding the "giant treated robot" was almost beyond belief in
it's stupidity. Yes, food is gathered for the cows. Yes, it is brought to
the troughs from which the cows eat. This is, in fact, a process that is
carried out in part by people, and in part by machines - much like any
assembly-line-like product.

If these concepts are foreign to you, then I certainly agree you need a
stronger dose, though reality might not be the first thing on your list of
required Rxs.

Wayne S. Hill
October 18th 04, 01:53 PM
James Stein wrote:

> Your comment regarding the "giant treated robot" was almost
> beyond belief in it's stupidity. Yes, food is gathered for
> the cows. Yes, it is brought to the troughs from which the
> cows eat. This is, in fact, a process that is carried out in
> part by people, and in part by machines - much like any
> assembly-line-like product.

I don't know a grass-fed beef farmer who would do that. Animals
that are fed exclusively on grass are usually good grazers. You
feed them the best possible hay when there's no grass, but they're
still free to roam.

-Wayne

Lee Michaels
October 18th 04, 02:34 PM
"Wayne S. Hill" wrote

> James Stein wrote:
>
> > Your comment regarding the "giant treated robot" was almost
> > beyond belief in it's stupidity. Yes, food is gathered for
> > the cows. Yes, it is brought to the troughs from which the
> > cows eat. This is, in fact, a process that is carried out in
> > part by people, and in part by machines - much like any
> > assembly-line-like product.
>
> I don't know a grass-fed beef farmer who would do that. Animals
> that are fed exclusively on grass are usually good grazers. You
> feed them the best possible hay when there's no grass, but they're
> still free to roam.
>

With the possible exception of the bio-engineered grass, that when
approaching the end of their life cycle, just get and walk to the nearest
cow and throw themselves at their feet.


> -Wayne

James Stein
October 18th 04, 02:35 PM
"Wayne S. Hill" > wrote in message
...
> James Stein wrote:
>
>> Your comment regarding the "giant treated robot" was almost
>> beyond belief in it's stupidity. Yes, food is gathered for
>> the cows. Yes, it is brought to the troughs from which the
>> cows eat. This is, in fact, a process that is carried out in
>> part by people, and in part by machines - much like any
>> assembly-line-like product.
>
> I don't know a grass-fed beef farmer who would do that. Animals
> that are fed exclusively on grass are usually good grazers. You
> feed them the best possible hay when there's no grass, but they're
> still free to roam.

Mind you, my initial post made no argument that grass-fed equalled
free-range or otherwise. I merely commented on the antibiotic content of the
food provided to bovines, and the much larger quantity given to penned
animals. I merely had to respond to the overwhelming incredulity at the very
possibility that a cow might somehow ingest a certain product without being
there to tear it from the ground itself.

Axel of the North!
October 20th 04, 05:43 AM
On Mon, 18 Oct 2004 03:32:21 GMT, "James Stein"
> wrote:

>
>"Axel of the North!" > wrote in message
...
>> On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 16:07:41 GMT, "James Stein"
>> > wrote:
>>>
>>>"z_bumbi" > wrote in message
om...
>>>> (Axel of the North!) wrote in message
>>>> >...
>>>>> what it
>>>>> eats is what matters, not whether or not it is out in the wild vs.
>>>>> controlled by humans.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> The type of animal does mater and last time I was in the wild I didnīt
>>>> see any cows breeded to give as much meat as possibly, the amount of
>>>> exercise that the animal do also have an impact on the quality of the
>>>> meat.
>>>
>>>Not to mention that non-free-range meat is kept in cages and fed
>>>*humongous*
>>>amounts of antibiotics. Even free-range meat is fed large quantities of
>>>antibio's these days, but those in cages are fed far more, due to their
>>>close quarters, large numbers, and lack of mobility resulting in 'bed
>>>sore'
>>>type infectios.
>>>
>>
>> alright... but doesn't it make sense that grass-fed animals are... not
>> penned up because they are walking around when they are EATING THE
>> GRASS??? oh, no, wait, i guess i forgot!
>>
>> how silly of me!!!
>>
>> i forgot about the giant treaded robot with the many white-gloved
>> robotic arms that picked up all the cows and mechanically ran them
>> over the ground, thus eliminating the bovine's need to walk while it
>> eats the food that makes it grow (thus enabling the animal to bulk up
>> easier, increasing net profits!).
>>
>> thanks, guys. i really needed that fresh dose of reality...
>
>I.
>
>See that? It's a capital letter.

my sincerest thanks burt aye feel aye am unworthy of such honuhs. i
shell re-mane UNcapitolized,,, (it's also easier on the ole eyes)

>
>Also: .
>It's a period. A cousin to the exclamation point it is, in fact, just as
>effective at ending a sentence.
>
>Now then, to address your comments; I never commented on the relationship of
>"free range" to "grass-eating." Now, surely, one could *stretch* their
>imagine to it's utmost and think that perhaps one could pen an animal and
>*bring* it grass; much in the same way that a penned animal would be brought
>*any* sort of food, since regardless of what food you use an example, the
>bovine in question will not be moving to it.

i've heard that something "magically" essential is lost if it is cut
and left to suffer for too long.

>
>Your comment regarding the "giant treated robot" was almost beyond belief in
>it's stupidity. Yes, food is gathered for the cows. Yes, it is brought to
>the troughs from which the cows eat. This is, in fact, a process that is
>carried out in part by people, and in part by machines - much like any
>assembly-line-like product.

i'm guess i'm a really stupid guy. but it wasn't "treated", it was
"treaded".

>
>If these concepts are foreign to you, then I certainly agree you need a
>stronger dose, though reality might not be the first thing on your list of
>required Rxs.
>

thank you, sir. just reading your post was like a blast of real
reality.

James Stein
October 20th 04, 11:03 PM
"Axel of the North!" > wrote in message
...
> On Mon, 18 Oct 2004 03:32:21 GMT, "James Stein"
> > wrote:
>
>>
>>"Axel of the North!" > wrote in message
...
>>> On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 16:07:41 GMT, "James Stein"
>>> > wrote:
>>>>
>>>>"z_bumbi" > wrote in message
om...
>>>>> (Axel of the North!) wrote in message
>>>>> >...
>>>>>> what it
>>>>>> eats is what matters, not whether or not it is out in the wild vs.
>>>>>> controlled by humans.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> The type of animal does mater and last time I was in the wild I didnīt
>>>>> see any cows breeded to give as much meat as possibly, the amount of
>>>>> exercise that the animal do also have an impact on the quality of the
>>>>> meat.
>>>>
>>>>Not to mention that non-free-range meat is kept in cages and fed
>>>>*humongous*
>>>>amounts of antibiotics. Even free-range meat is fed large quantities of
>>>>antibio's these days, but those in cages are fed far more, due to their
>>>>close quarters, large numbers, and lack of mobility resulting in 'bed
>>>>sore'
>>>>type infectios.
>>>>
>>>
>>> alright... but doesn't it make sense that grass-fed animals are... not
>>> penned up because they are walking around when they are EATING THE
>>> GRASS??? oh, no, wait, i guess i forgot!
>>>
>>> how silly of me!!!
>>>
>>> i forgot about the giant treaded robot with the many white-gloved
>>> robotic arms that picked up all the cows and mechanically ran them
>>> over the ground, thus eliminating the bovine's need to walk while it
>>> eats the food that makes it grow (thus enabling the animal to bulk up
>>> easier, increasing net profits!).
>>>
>>> thanks, guys. i really needed that fresh dose of reality...
>>
>>I.
>>
>>See that? It's a capital letter.
>
> my sincerest thanks burt aye feel aye am unworthy of such honuhs. i
> shell re-mane UNcapitolized,,, (it's also easier on the ole eyes)
>

Then you get killfiled. Simple, eh?

Remainder of your replies snipped due to lack of wit.

Axel of the North!
October 21st 04, 04:32 AM
On Wed, 20 Oct 2004 22:03:06 GMT, "James Stein"
> wrote:

>
>"Axel of the North!" > wrote in message
...
>> On Mon, 18 Oct 2004 03:32:21 GMT, "James Stein"
>> > wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>"Axel of the North!" > wrote in message
...
>>>> On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 16:07:41 GMT, "James Stein"
>>>> > wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>"z_bumbi" > wrote in message
om...
>>>>>> (Axel of the North!) wrote in message
>>>>>> >...
>>>>>>> what it
>>>>>>> eats is what matters, not whether or not it is out in the wild vs.
>>>>>>> controlled by humans.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> The type of animal does mater and last time I was in the wild I didnīt
>>>>>> see any cows breeded to give as much meat as possibly, the amount of
>>>>>> exercise that the animal do also have an impact on the quality of the
>>>>>> meat.
>>>>>
>>>>>Not to mention that non-free-range meat is kept in cages and fed
>>>>>*humongous*
>>>>>amounts of antibiotics. Even free-range meat is fed large quantities of
>>>>>antibio's these days, but those in cages are fed far more, due to their
>>>>>close quarters, large numbers, and lack of mobility resulting in 'bed
>>>>>sore'
>>>>>type infectios.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> alright... but doesn't it make sense that grass-fed animals are... not
>>>> penned up because they are walking around when they are EATING THE
>>>> GRASS??? oh, no, wait, i guess i forgot!
>>>>
>>>> how silly of me!!!
>>>>
>>>> i forgot about the giant treaded robot with the many white-gloved
>>>> robotic arms that picked up all the cows and mechanically ran them
>>>> over the ground, thus eliminating the bovine's need to walk while it
>>>> eats the food that makes it grow (thus enabling the animal to bulk up
>>>> easier, increasing net profits!).
>>>>
>>>> thanks, guys. i really needed that fresh dose of reality...
>>>
>>>I.
>>>
>>>See that? It's a capital letter.
>>
>> my sincerest thanks burt aye feel aye am unworthy of such honuhs. i
>> shell re-mane UNcapitolized,,, (it's also easier on the ole eyes)
>>
>
>Then you get killfiled. Simple, eh?
>
>Remainder of your replies snipped due to lack of wit.
>

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