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View Full Version : multi-gym - advice on which one?


Ric
September 26th 04, 03:21 PM
Hi

New here - hoping for some useful advice.

I want to buy a multi-gym - the ones I have been looking at are around the
250 - 300 mark, by Weider, York (the main one I am considering is the 'York
2002 Multi-Gym') and various other brands.

I am 50 and about 1.5 stone overweight and pretty un-fit, I've just acquired
a very basic rowing machine for the warm-up/cardio vascular.

Any thoughts/advice on the matter would be appreciated!

Thanks in advance

Ric

Lee Michaels
September 26th 04, 05:30 PM
"Ric" > wrote in message
...
> Hi
>
> New here - hoping for some useful advice.
>
> I want to buy a multi-gym - the ones I have been looking at are around the
> 250 - 300 mark, by Weider, York (the main one I am considering is the
'York
> 2002 Multi-Gym') and various other brands.
>
> I am 50 and about 1.5 stone overweight and pretty un-fit, I've just
acquired
> a very basic rowing machine for the warm-up/cardio vascular.
>
> Any thoughts/advice on the matter would be appreciated!
>
> Thanks in advance
>
>

Multi gyms are a waste of time and money. Buy real weights. They are much
safer, cheaper and more effective.

Anna Martelli Ravenscroft
September 26th 04, 05:41 PM
Ric wrote:
> Hi
>
> New here - hoping for some useful advice.
>
> I want to buy a multi-gym - the ones I have been looking at are around the
> 250 - 300 mark, by Weider, York (the main one I am considering is the 'York
> 2002 Multi-Gym') and various other brands.
>
> I am 50 and about 1.5 stone overweight and pretty un-fit, I've just acquired
> a very basic rowing machine for the warm-up/cardio vascular.
>
> Any thoughts/advice on the matter would be appreciated!

I got one of those for free once upon a time. I quickly dumped it for a
bench and freeweights. Unless you're built EXACTLY like the guy they
modelled it after - it won't fit right - which means it'll mess you up.

You're better off buying a simple bench (NOT the junk with the leg
extension thingies = but make sure to get one that you can bench press
with), a barbell, some dumbbell handles, a bunch of weights, and mebbe a
pullup bar. You can get some great results with just that. And some of
the benches are fold-uppable, so they don't take up much space. Oh, get
a couple good pads for under your barbell for when you deadlift.

Read www.stumptuous.com/weights.html for a good beginners program, and
www.exrx.net for nice explanations (with video clips) of how to do the
exercises.

Good for you for taking control of your health.

Anna

Former Bodybuilder
October 26th 04, 06:20 PM
How are your joints? As fory-three year old, former competitive bodybuilder
with severe joint damage, I would recommend against using free weight until
you have conditioned yourself to the point where the little muscles that
stabilize the weight have been toned. The number one problem with using
free weight is that it is very easy to injure one's joints. I am living
proof of what free weight can do to the human body over time. I have
already undergone three joint-related surgies: namely, Baker cyst removal
(herniated synovial sac), subacromial decompression, rotator cuff repair,
and I am sure that I will need to have both my knees resurfaced by the time
I hit my mid fifties.