PDA

View Full Version : OT - How to catch a hummingbird


Proton Soup
September 27th 04, 04:55 AM
I caught a hummingbird this evening, and I'm not even a certified
ninja. See, I've got this feeder on the back porch, and hanging off
the edge is a feeder. I had left not only the sliding glass door
open, but in order to hopefully get a little more breeze blowing in,
the screen was also open.

I guess I should have known better. I've even seen one chase another
into the glass before when the vertical blinds were pulled back. Must
be what happened this time, another one chased it in and it got stuck.

Now, I don't know if you've ever had a bird in your living room or
not, but they get really confused. Apparently seeing an open door is
not enough invitation to fly back out. She kept flying towards the
lamps for some reason, like an oversized moth. And straight up is
also a prefered direction, which ceilings seem to complicate.

So I first tried what I thought was a logical approach, turn on the
porch light, turn off the inside lights (it was already dark out), and
the bird would fly towards the open door and out. Wrong. Turning
off the lights inside just made her freak out. Lots of buzzing along
the ceiling. No acknowledgement at all of the light outside.

At some point, she alit on an antler I had found and used to adorn the
top of my bookshelf. I decided to turn the light back off and
approached. To my surprise, I was able to slowly reach my hand behind
and grab her.

So now for the release. When I get outside, I open my hand and she's
playing dead. Then suddenly springs to life and is now buzzing the
ceiling of the porch. *sigh* At some point she calms down and lands
on the feeder. When she appeared to have taken her fill, I turned off
the light. Last time I peeked, she was sleeping there. So I learned
something firsthand today that I'm not likely to forget. Birds, or
hummers at least, can't see in the dark.

-----------
Proton Soup

"Homo sapiens non urinat in ventum."

Jim Ranieri
September 27th 04, 03:28 PM
"Proton Soup" > wrote in message

> So now for the release. When I get outside, I open my hand and she's
> playing dead. Then suddenly springs to life and is now buzzing the
> ceiling of the porch. *sigh* At some point she calms down and lands
> on the feeder. When she appeared to have taken her fill, I turned off
> the light. Last time I peeked, she was sleeping there. So I learned
> something firsthand today that I'm not likely to forget. Birds, or
> hummers at least, can't see in the dark.
>

Bizzare little creatures. Like big bugs with beaks. They tend to get
themselves trapped in open garages as well - the theory being that the
hanging door release handle (usually red) entices them in. Once they get in,
their escape strategy is to fly straight up and they end up exhausting
themselves after banging against the ceiling for a couple hours.

bc
September 27th 04, 05:21 PM
Proton Soup > wrote in message >...
> I caught a hummingbird this evening, and I'm not even a certified
> ninja.

> At some point, she alit on an antler I had found and used to adorn the
> top of my bookshelf. I decided to turn the light back off and
> approached. To my surprise, I was able to slowly reach my hand behind
> and grab her.
>
> So now for the release. When I get outside, I open my hand and she's
> playing dead. Then suddenly springs to life and is now buzzing the
> ceiling of the porch. *sigh* At some point she calms down and lands
> on the feeder. When she appeared to have taken her fill, I turned off
> the light. Last time I peeked, she was sleeping there.

I caught one once in a similar way. It flew into a large electronics
lab where I was working as a summer hire. It had windows up high all
around, and the hummingbird was focused on getting out of one of
those, but we couldn't remove the screen. So, I stood on a lab bench
and just slowly reached up to it, closing my hands around it while it
hovered at the screen. It relaxed so that I could grip it loosely,
and I jumped down and let it go outside the doors. I was astounded
that it let me do that.

- bc

Karl Hungus
September 27th 04, 06:39 PM
"Proton Soup" > wrote in message
...

> I caught a hummingbird this evening, and I'm not even a certified
> ninja. See, I've got this feeder on the back porch, and hanging off
> the edge is a feeder. I had left not only the sliding glass door
> open, but in order to hopefully get a little more breeze blowing in,
> the screen was also open.


And you let it go. Obviously someone's never eaten fresh wild hummingbird,
and doesn't realize what a delicacy it truly is. Their dark, succulent meat
makes for a truly remarkable (and decadent!) feast. As always, though,
proper preparation is key. Here's how I prepare mine:

First, open and empty the body cavity of all innards (ideally, this should
be done in the field). You'll need a SHARP, heavy-bladed knife to get
through the bird's tough skin and heavy bone. The innards can be set aside
for later use in a gravy or sauce. Next, be sure all shot is removed.
Fortunately, since #4 shot or larger is recommended to reliably down one of
these creatures, this task is usually quick and easy.

Once this is done, and the feathers have been removed, you're ready to begin
cooking. A simple box stuffing, such as Stovetop, can really enhance an
already-fine meal. For cooking, I recommend a 350-degree oven, cooking for
about 15 minutes per pound. Average cooking time is around 27 seconds.

Lee Michaels
September 27th 04, 06:44 PM
"bc" wrote
>
> I caught one once in a similar way. It flew into a large electronics
> lab where I was working as a summer hire. It had windows up high all
> around, and the hummingbird was focused on getting out of one of
> those, but we couldn't remove the screen. So, I stood on a lab bench
> and just slowly reached up to it, closing my hands around it while it
> hovered at the screen. It relaxed so that I could grip it loosely,
> and I jumped down and let it go outside the doors. I was astounded
> that it let me do that.
>
Yes grasshopper.

That is when we know that you would become a shaolin priest.

spodosaurus
September 27th 04, 06:45 PM
So YOU are patient 0 of the new improved bird flu!

--
spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

Proton Soup
September 27th 04, 07:17 PM
On 27 Sep 2004 09:21:04 -0700, (bc)
wrote:

>Proton Soup > wrote in message >...
>> I caught a hummingbird this evening, and I'm not even a certified
>> ninja.
>
>> At some point, she alit on an antler I had found and used to adorn the
>> top of my bookshelf. I decided to turn the light back off and
>> approached. To my surprise, I was able to slowly reach my hand behind
>> and grab her.
>>
>> So now for the release. When I get outside, I open my hand and she's
>> playing dead. Then suddenly springs to life and is now buzzing the
>> ceiling of the porch. *sigh* At some point she calms down and lands
>> on the feeder. When she appeared to have taken her fill, I turned off
>> the light. Last time I peeked, she was sleeping there.
>
>I caught one once in a similar way. It flew into a large electronics
>lab where I was working as a summer hire. It had windows up high all
>around, and the hummingbird was focused on getting out of one of
>those, but we couldn't remove the screen. So, I stood on a lab bench
>and just slowly reached up to it, closing my hands around it while it
>hovered at the screen. It relaxed so that I could grip it loosely,
>and I jumped down and let it go outside the doors. I was astounded
>that it let me do that.

Yeah, it was really calm (or terrified perhaps). No struggle at all.

-----------
Proton Soup

"Homo sapiens non urinat in ventum."

Proton Soup
September 27th 04, 07:19 PM
On Mon, 27 Sep 2004 17:39:06 GMT, "Karl Hungus"
> wrote:

>
>"Proton Soup" > wrote in message
...
>
>> I caught a hummingbird this evening, and I'm not even a certified
>> ninja. See, I've got this feeder on the back porch, and hanging off
>> the edge is a feeder. I had left not only the sliding glass door
>> open, but in order to hopefully get a little more breeze blowing in,
>> the screen was also open.
>
>
>And you let it go. Obviously someone's never eaten fresh wild hummingbird,
>and doesn't realize what a delicacy it truly is. Their dark, succulent meat
>makes for a truly remarkable (and decadent!) feast. As always, though,
>proper preparation is key. Here's how I prepare mine:
>
>First, open and empty the body cavity of all innards (ideally, this should
>be done in the field). You'll need a SHARP, heavy-bladed knife to get
>through the bird's tough skin and heavy bone. The innards can be set aside
>for later use in a gravy or sauce. Next, be sure all shot is removed.
>Fortunately, since #4 shot or larger is recommended to reliably down one of
>these creatures, this task is usually quick and easy.
>
>Once this is done, and the feathers have been removed, you're ready to begin
>cooking. A simple box stuffing, such as Stovetop, can really enhance an
>already-fine meal. For cooking, I recommend a 350-degree oven, cooking for
>about 15 minutes per pound. Average cooking time is around 27 seconds.

I guess you have no French in your blood then. Evisceration is for
sissies. You eat it whole.

-----------
Proton Soup

"Homo sapiens non urinat in ventum."

Lee Michaels
September 27th 04, 07:36 PM
"Proton Soup" > wrote in message
...
> On Mon, 27 Sep 2004 17:39:06 GMT, "Karl Hungus"
> > wrote:
>
> >
> >"Proton Soup" > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> >> I caught a hummingbird this evening, and I'm not even a certified
> >> ninja. See, I've got this feeder on the back porch, and hanging off
> >> the edge is a feeder. I had left not only the sliding glass door
> >> open, but in order to hopefully get a little more breeze blowing in,
> >> the screen was also open.
> >
> >
> >And you let it go. Obviously someone's never eaten fresh wild
hummingbird,
> >and doesn't realize what a delicacy it truly is. Their dark, succulent
meat
> >makes for a truly remarkable (and decadent!) feast. As always, though,
> >proper preparation is key. Here's how I prepare mine:
> >
> >First, open and empty the body cavity of all innards (ideally, this
should
> >be done in the field). You'll need a SHARP, heavy-bladed knife to get
> >through the bird's tough skin and heavy bone. The innards can be set
aside
> >for later use in a gravy or sauce. Next, be sure all shot is removed.
> >Fortunately, since #4 shot or larger is recommended to reliably down one
of
> >these creatures, this task is usually quick and easy.
> >
> >Once this is done, and the feathers have been removed, you're ready to
begin
> >cooking. A simple box stuffing, such as Stovetop, can really enhance an
> >already-fine meal. For cooking, I recommend a 350-degree oven, cooking
for
> >about 15 minutes per pound. Average cooking time is around 27 seconds.
>
> I guess you have no French in your blood then. Evisceration is for
> sissies. You eat it whole.
>
He also must be anorexic.

How much meat is on a hummingbird?

Jim Ranieri
September 27th 04, 09:25 PM
"Lee Michaels" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s01...
>
> "Proton Soup" > wrote in message
> ...
> > On Mon, 27 Sep 2004 17:39:06 GMT, "Karl Hungus"
> > > wrote:
> >
> > >
> > >"Proton Soup" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > >
> > >> I caught a hummingbird this evening, and I'm not even a certified
> > >> ninja. See, I've got this feeder on the back porch, and hanging off
> > >> the edge is a feeder. I had left not only the sliding glass door
> > >> open, but in order to hopefully get a little more breeze blowing in,
> > >> the screen was also open.
> > >
> > >
> > >And you let it go. Obviously someone's never eaten fresh wild
> hummingbird,
> > >and doesn't realize what a delicacy it truly is. Their dark, succulent
> meat
> > >makes for a truly remarkable (and decadent!) feast. As always, though,
> > >proper preparation is key. Here's how I prepare mine:
> > >
> > >First, open and empty the body cavity of all innards (ideally, this
> should
> > >be done in the field). You'll need a SHARP, heavy-bladed knife to get
> > >through the bird's tough skin and heavy bone. The innards can be set
> aside
> > >for later use in a gravy or sauce. Next, be sure all shot is removed.
> > >Fortunately, since #4 shot or larger is recommended to reliably down
one
> of
> > >these creatures, this task is usually quick and easy.
> > >
> > >Once this is done, and the feathers have been removed, you're ready to
> begin
> > >cooking. A simple box stuffing, such as Stovetop, can really enhance
an
> > >already-fine meal. For cooking, I recommend a 350-degree oven, cooking
> for
> > >about 15 minutes per pound. Average cooking time is around 27 seconds.
> >
> > I guess you have no French in your blood then. Evisceration is for
> > sissies. You eat it whole.
> >
> He also must be anorexic.
>
> How much meat is on a hummingbird?
>
>
>

You really need about 40-50 of 'em. Dip in batter (whole), deep fry and
serve with dipping sauce.

John M. Williams
September 27th 04, 11:03 PM
Proton Soup > wrote:

>I caught a hummingbird this evening, and I'm not even a certified
>ninja. See, I've got this feeder on the back porch, and hanging off
>the edge is a feeder. I had left not only the sliding glass door
>open, but in order to hopefully get a little more breeze blowing in,
>the screen was also open.
>
>I guess I should have known better. I've even seen one chase another
>into the glass before when the vertical blinds were pulled back. Must
>be what happened this time, another one chased it in and it got stuck.
>
>Now, I don't know if you've ever had a bird in your living room or
>not, but they get really confused. Apparently seeing an open door is
>not enough invitation to fly back out. She kept flying towards the
>lamps for some reason, like an oversized moth. And straight up is
>also a prefered direction, which ceilings seem to complicate.
>
>So I first tried what I thought was a logical approach, turn on the
>porch light, turn off the inside lights (it was already dark out), and
>the bird would fly towards the open door and out. Wrong. Turning
>off the lights inside just made her freak out. Lots of buzzing along
>the ceiling. No acknowledgement at all of the light outside.
>
>At some point, she alit on an antler I had found and used to adorn the
>top of my bookshelf. I decided to turn the light back off and
>approached. To my surprise, I was able to slowly reach my hand behind
>and grab her.
>
>So now for the release. When I get outside, I open my hand and she's
>playing dead. Then suddenly springs to life and is now buzzing the
>ceiling of the porch. *sigh* At some point she calms down and lands
>on the feeder. When she appeared to have taken her fill, I turned off
>the light. Last time I peeked, she was sleeping there. So I learned
>something firsthand today that I'm not likely to forget. Birds, or
>hummers at least, can't see in the dark.

A similar thing happened to my sister-in-law recently. She found the
hummingbird floundering in one of the potted plants on her front
porch, probably after hitting one of the windows. She didn't know how
long it had been there. She took it to the feeder and found the
feeder empty, so she put the bird on a bench and filled the feeder.
It was still there when she came back. She put its beak in the feeder
several times, but to no avail; on the fourth try, it started
drinking. To make sure it could breath, she withdrew its beak several
times, but she let it drink until it had its fill. She put it back on
the bench, waited a couple of minutes, and suddenly, it flew away.

Seth Breidbart
September 28th 04, 12:44 AM
In article <[email protected]_s01>,
Lee Michaels > wrote:
>> On Mon, 27 Sep 2004 17:39:06 GMT, "Karl Hungus"
>> > wrote:

>> > For cooking, I recommend a 350-degree oven, cooking for
>> >about 15 minutes per pound. Average cooking time is around 27 seconds.

>He also must be anorexic.
>
>How much meat is on a hummingbird?

Do the arithmetic yourself.

Seth
--
Of course, common logic fails to hold up here on mfw, as a general rule
of thumb. -- Lyle McDonald