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bc
September 27th 04, 05:30 PM
I was looking at a few shots in the newspaper from the games this
weekend, and it caused me to wonder, what kind of strength training do
NFL teams use? There's tons of muscle out there on the field, and it
would seem that compounds would be the way to build the overall full
body strength needed to survive the game. Has anyone here been
involved with one of the programs enough to know how they train?

- bc

Keith Hobman
September 27th 04, 08:30 PM
In article >,
(bc) wrote:

> I was looking at a few shots in the newspaper from the games this
> weekend, and it caused me to wonder, what kind of strength training do
> NFL teams use? There's tons of muscle out there on the field, and it
> would seem that compounds would be the way to build the overall full
> body strength needed to survive the game. Has anyone here been
> involved with one of the programs enough to know how they train?

Every team has their own strength coach and there isn't one method.

The Green Bay Packers use a variation of Westside Barbell training.

I don't know if they still do, but for years the Washington Redskins used HIT.

The best coaches seem to integrate a variety of methods and apply them
individually to address each athletes particular needs and personality. As
with everything else - one size (method) doesn't fit all. Never has, never
will.

Mike Singletary was a good example. He didn't like weights and all used a
device where he basically rotated his torso. That, in combination with
sprints, agility drills, hills, stairs and sleds kept him in pretty good
shape.

Jerry Rice is a training fanatic who uses what seems like a different
method every off-season. But consistent is hill sprints and focus.

Nina
September 27th 04, 09:37 PM
>In article >,
(bc) wrote:
>
>> I was looking at a few shots in the newspaper from the games this
>> weekend, and it caused me to wonder, what kind of strength training do
>> NFL teams use? There's tons of muscle out there on the field, and it
>> would seem that compounds would be the way to build the overall full
>> body strength needed to survive the game. Has anyone here been
>> involved with one of the programs enough to know how they train?
>

It's not NFL, but there's an article in the 2004 College Football
Preview with the strength coaches from USC and other ranked teams.

Cheers,
Nina
delicious! evil! calorie free!
http://www.theslack.com

DoctorElefant
September 27th 04, 10:16 PM
In message-id: >

(bc) wrote:

>I was looking at a few shots in the newspaper from the games this
>weekend, and it caused me to wonder, what kind of strength training do
>NFL teams use? There's tons of muscle out there on the field, and it
>would seem that compounds would be the way to build the overall full
>body strength needed to survive the game. Has anyone here been
>involved with one of the programs enough to know how they train?

From what I've heard lately...

I understand the Jacksonville Jaguars, since Jack Del Rio took over as head
coach, use HIT and have machines and free weights.

On the other hand, the New York Giants, since (the former Jacksonville coach)
Tom Coughlin took over as head coach, got rid of their exercise machines and
only have free weights on site. They also do some kind of combination
strength-endurance weight training where they go heavy, strip off weight and go
for more reps. I don't know if the results are any better, but one defensive
lineman tore a pectoral muscle in the off-season doing this method. I'm not
certain, but I think their strength coach also likes plyometrics which some
coaches don't.

Tiki Barber, the Giants star running back, hired his own trainer in the
off-season and did HIT. He said it made him a lot stronger and put on about 10
pounds.


DocE
--------
"The future ain't what it used to be." -Yogi Berra

September 28th 04, 12:42 AM
On 27 Sep 2004 21:16:21 GMT, (DoctorElefant)
wrote:

>Tiki Barber, the Giants star running back, hired his own trainer in the
>off-season and did HIT. He said it made him a lot stronger and put on about 10
>pounds.
>
Would this be Joe Carini?

http://www.fourseasonsfitness.net/trainers/index.html

http://www.blackchat.co.uk/theblackforum/forum36/3477-7.html

DoctorElefant
September 28th 04, 08:48 AM
In message-id: >

wrote:

>Would this be Joe Carini?
>
>http://www.fourseasonsfitness.net/trainers/index.html
>
>http://www.blackchat.co.uk/theblackforum/forum36/3477-7.html

Must be.




DocE
--------
"The future ain't what it used to be." -Yogi Berra

Jay
September 29th 04, 05:23 PM
> Every team has their own strength coach and there isn't one method.
>
> The Green Bay Packers use a variation of Westside Barbell training.

Might this explain their level of success?
>
> I don't know if they still do, but for years the Washington Redskins used
HIT.

might this explain their level of failure?
>
> The best coaches seem to integrate a variety of methods and apply them
> individually to address each athletes particular needs and personality. As
> with everything else - one size (method) doesn't fit all. Never has, never
> will.
>
> Mike Singletary was a good example. He didn't like weights and all used a
> device where he basically rotated his torso. That, in combination with
> sprints, agility drills, hills, stairs and sleds kept him in pretty good
> shape.
>
> Jerry Rice is a training fanatic who uses what seems like a different
> method every off-season. But consistent is hill sprints and focus.

Lyle McDonald
September 29th 04, 09:03 PM
Jay wrote:

>>Every team has their own strength coach and there isn't one method.
>>
>>The Green Bay Packers use a variation of Westside Barbell training.
>
>
> Might this explain their level of success?
>
>>I don't know if they still do, but for years the Washington Redskins used
>
> HIT.
>
> might this explain their level of failure?

No in both casese.
Success in a team sport like football is only marginally (at best) going
to be related to the S&C component of training, IMO. So much skill,
strategy and other stuff involved.

Lyle

Keith Hobman
September 29th 04, 09:13 PM
In article >, Lyle McDonald
> wrote:

> Jay wrote:
>
> >>Every team has their own strength coach and there isn't one method.
> >>
> >>The Green Bay Packers use a variation of Westside Barbell training.
> >
> >
> > Might this explain their level of success?
> >
> >>I don't know if they still do, but for years the Washington Redskins used
> >
> > HIT.
> >
> > might this explain their level of failure?
>
> No in both casese.
> Success in a team sport like football is only marginally (at best) going
> to be related to the S&C component of training, IMO. So much skill,
> strategy and other stuff involved.

FWIW Eddie George uses yoga for strength and conditioning. But you've got
a naturally big, genetically gifted guy who is doing lots of conditioning
specific to being a running back who supplements his training with yoga.
None the less all the yoga people jumped on yoga being responsible for
George's longevity and success.

Also, backing up Lyle's point.

Washington was using HIT in the 80's - 3 Superbowl appearance, 2 wins.
Their coach didn't really care how effective it was ofr strength compared
to other methods. It gave him more time to work on sport specific skills,
plays and other stuff. Washington was hugely successful during their HIT
period. Green Bay during their Westside period. S&C is just icing on the
cake for these people.