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Tiger Hillside
September 28th 04, 04:39 PM
I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting. I
have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before and
during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can have
some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:


1) Make sure to warm up.
2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
3) Always use good form.
4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what % of
your single life amount you should use.)
5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
muscles at a time.

I have fewer for stretching and want more:

1) Stretch when warm.
2) Don't bounce.
3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.

I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but remember
I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.

Keith Hobman
September 28th 04, 04:47 PM
In article >, Tiger Hillside
> wrote:

> I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting. I
> have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before and
> during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can have
> some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
>
>
> 1) Make sure to warm up.
> 2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
> 3) Always use good form.
> 4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
> important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what % of
> your single life amount you should use.)
> 5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
> muscles at a time.
>
> I have fewer for stretching and want more:
>
> 1) Stretch when warm.
> 2) Don't bounce.
> 3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
> 4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
>
> I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but remember
> I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.

You need to review stretching.

There is a place for ballistic stretching. You are describing one type of
stretching.

John M. Williams
September 28th 04, 05:23 PM
Tiger Hillside > wrote:

>I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting. I
>have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before and
>during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can have
>some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
>
>
>1) Make sure to warm up.
>2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>3) Always use good form.
>4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what % of
>your single life amount you should use.)
>5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
>muscles at a time.
>
>I have fewer for stretching and want more:
>
>1) Stretch when warm.
>2) Don't bounce.
>3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
>4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
>
>I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but remember
>I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.

OK. "Just shut up and lift."

David
September 28th 04, 06:48 PM
"John M. Williams" > wrote in message
...
> Tiger Hillside > wrote:
>
> >I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting. I
> >have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before and
> >during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can have
> >some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
> >
> >
> >1) Make sure to warm up.
> >2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
> >3) Always use good form.
> >4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
> >important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what % of
> >your single life amount you should use.)
> >5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
> >muscles at a time.
> >
> >I have fewer for stretching and want more:
> >
> >1) Stretch when warm.
> >2) Don't bounce.
> >3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
> >4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
> >
> >I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but remember
> >I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.
>
> OK. "Just shut up and lift."

I like "Shut the **** up and lift" better

Larry Hodges
September 28th 04, 07:10 PM
David wrote:
> "John M. Williams" > wrote in
> message ...
>> Tiger Hillside > wrote:
>>
>>> I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting.
>>> I have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before
>>> and during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can
>>> have some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
>>>
>>>
>>> 1) Make sure to warm up.
>>> 2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>>> 3) Always use good form.
>>> 4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>>> important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what %
>>> of your single life amount you should use.)
>>> 5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
>>> muscles at a time.
>>>
>>> I have fewer for stretching and want more:
>>>
>>> 1) Stretch when warm.
>>> 2) Don't bounce.
>>> 3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
>>> 4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
>>>
>>> I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but
>>> remember I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.
>>
>> OK. "Just shut up and lift."
>
> I like "Shut the **** up and lift" better

Shut the sam hell **** up and lift!
--
-Larry

Tiger Hillside
September 28th 04, 07:21 PM
On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 11:10:48 -0700, "Larry Hodges"
> wrote:

>David wrote:
>> "John M. Williams" > wrote in
>> message ...
>>> Tiger Hillside > wrote:
>>>
>>>> I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting.
>>>> I have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before
>>>> and during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can
>>>> have some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> 1) Make sure to warm up.
>>>> 2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>>>> 3) Always use good form.
>>>> 4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>>>> important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what %
>>>> of your single life amount you should use.)
>>>> 5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
>>>> muscles at a time.
>>>>
>>>> I have fewer for stretching and want more:
>>>>
>>>> 1) Stretch when warm.
>>>> 2) Don't bounce.
>>>> 3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
>>>> 4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
>>>>
>>>> I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but
>>>> remember I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.
>>>
>>> OK. "Just shut up and lift."
>>
>> I like "Shut the **** up and lift" better
>
>Shut the sam hell **** up and lift!

Then what is the point of a newsgroup regarding weights?

Larry Hodges
September 28th 04, 07:29 PM
Tiger Hillside wrote:
> On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 11:10:48 -0700, "Larry Hodges"
> > wrote:
>
>> David wrote:
>>> "John M. Williams" > wrote in
>>> message ...
>>>> Tiger Hillside > wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding
>>>>> lifting. I have to say I have been amazed how much mental work,
>>>>> but before and during the workout, lifting requires. It will help
>>>>> me if I can have some list of things to remember. Here is what I
>>>>> have so far:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> 1) Make sure to warm up.
>>>>> 2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>>>>> 3) Always use good form.
>>>>> 4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>>>>> important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what
>>>>> % of your single life amount you should use.)
>>>>> 5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work
>>>>> several muscles at a time.
>>>>>
>>>>> I have fewer for stretching and want more:
>>>>>
>>>>> 1) Stretch when warm.
>>>>> 2) Don't bounce.
>>>>> 3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
>>>>> 4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
>>>>>
>>>>> I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but
>>>>> remember I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.
>>>>
>>>> OK. "Just shut up and lift."
>>>
>>> I like "Shut the **** up and lift" better
>>
>> Shut the sam hell **** up and lift!
>
> Then what is the point of a newsgroup regarding weights?

This branch of the thread deals more with the "misc" portion of mfw. We
trust you found our personal training tips helpful.
--
-Larry

Keith Hobman
September 28th 04, 07:29 PM
In article >, Tiger Hillside
> wrote:

> On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 11:10:48 -0700, "Larry Hodges"
> > wrote:
>
> >David wrote:
> >> "John M. Williams" > wrote in
> >> message ...
> >>> Tiger Hillside > wrote:
> >>>
> >>>> I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting.
> >>>> I have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before
> >>>> and during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can
> >>>> have some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>> 1) Make sure to warm up.
> >>>> 2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
> >>>> 3) Always use good form.
> >>>> 4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
> >>>> important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what %
> >>>> of your single life amount you should use.)
> >>>> 5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
> >>>> muscles at a time.
> >>>>
> >>>> I have fewer for stretching and want more:
> >>>>
> >>>> 1) Stretch when warm.
> >>>> 2) Don't bounce.
> >>>> 3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
> >>>> 4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
> >>>>
> >>>> I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but
> >>>> remember I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.
> >>>
> >>> OK. "Just shut up and lift."
> >>
> >> I like "Shut the **** up and lift" better
> >
> >Shut the sam hell **** up and lift!
>
> Then what is the point of a newsgroup regarding weights?

Dude - we're all about 'misc'.

HTH.

Larry Hodges
September 28th 04, 07:49 PM
Tiger Hillside wrote:
> I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting. I
> have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before and
> during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can have
> some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
>
>
> 1) Make sure to warm up.
> 2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
> 3) Always use good form.
> 4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
> important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what % of
> your single life amount you should use.)
> 5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
> muscles at a time.
>
> I have fewer for stretching and want more:
>
> 1) Stretch when warm.
> 2) Don't bounce.
> 3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
> 4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
>
> I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but remember
> I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.

I'll address your stretching question.

As Keith points out, bouncing is ballistic stretching. Static stretching is
when you enter into a stretch and hold it, pushing the limits of your
flexibility. This should only be done when warm.

Personally, I use ballistic stretching to warm up. But I DO NOT try to
increase flexibility, but rather simply warm up my muscles and joints with
the movement, stretching well within my flexibility limitations. In fact, I
don't attempt to even approach what I am capable of stretching at this
point.

After my workout, and I'm good and warm, I'll do static stretching if I want
to increase my flexibility. I will enter a stretch to the point of it being
uncomfortable and wait for a count of 10. By then, I've loosened up, so I
push farther into the stretch and hold for another 10 count. Repeat again
if you want. Let discomfort be your guide. You obviously will be
experiencing discomfort since you're pushing the limits of your current
flexibility, but it shouldn't hurt. Just remember, flexibility takes time
and consistent regular stretching to avoid injury. It's not just muscle
tissue, but all the connecting tissue and joints that you're pushing past
comfortable limits.

Some here argue that extreme flexibility is not necessarily a good thing for
a weight lifter, their argument being limited flexibility protects the
joints. I won't offer an opinion on this other than to say, for me, I like
good flexibility. But then again, martial arts is my emphasis, so I don't
fit the mold of just weight lifter. So take my advice with a grain of salt.
--
-Larry

John M. Williams
September 28th 04, 08:52 PM
Tiger Hillside > wrote:
> "Larry Hodges" > wrote:
>>David wrote:
>>> "John M. Williams" > wrote:
>>>> Tiger Hillside > wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting.
>>>>> I have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before
>>>>> and during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can
>>>>> have some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> 1) Make sure to warm up.
>>>>> 2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>>>>> 3) Always use good form.
>>>>> 4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>>>>> important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what %
>>>>> of your single life amount you should use.)
>>>>> 5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
>>>>> muscles at a time.
>>>>>
>>>>> I have fewer for stretching and want more:
>>>>>
>>>>> 1) Stretch when warm.
>>>>> 2) Don't bounce.
>>>>> 3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
>>>>> 4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
>>>>>
>>>>> I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but
>>>>> remember I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.
>>>>
>>>> OK. "Just shut up and lift."
>>>
>>> I like "Shut the **** up and lift" better
>>
>>Shut the sam hell **** up and lift!
>
>Then what is the point of a newsgroup regarding weights?

All our super-secret training tips are encoded into our off-topic
posts and can be decrypted only by the truly worthy. You don't get
the password yet.

David
September 28th 04, 10:14 PM
"Larry Hodges" > wrote in message
...
> Tiger Hillside wrote:
> > On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 11:10:48 -0700, "Larry Hodges"
> > > wrote:
> >
> >> David wrote:
> >>> "John M. Williams" > wrote in
> >>> message ...
> >>>> Tiger Hillside > wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>>> I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding
> >>>>> lifting. I have to say I have been amazed how much mental work,
> >>>>> but before and during the workout, lifting requires. It will help
> >>>>> me if I can have some list of things to remember. Here is what I
> >>>>> have so far:
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>> 1) Make sure to warm up.
> >>>>> 2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
> >>>>> 3) Always use good form.
> >>>>> 4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
> >>>>> important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what
> >>>>> % of your single life amount you should use.)
> >>>>> 5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work
> >>>>> several muscles at a time.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> I have fewer for stretching and want more:
> >>>>>
> >>>>> 1) Stretch when warm.
> >>>>> 2) Don't bounce.
> >>>>> 3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
> >>>>> 4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but
> >>>>> remember I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.
> >>>>
> >>>> OK. "Just shut up and lift."
> >>>
> >>> I like "Shut the **** up and lift" better
> >>
> >> Shut the sam hell **** up and lift!
> >
> > Then what is the point of a newsgroup regarding weights?
>
> This branch of the thread deals more with the "misc" portion of mfw. We
> trust you found our personal training tips helpful.
> --
> -Larry
>
Yes this is the 'inspirational' part of mfw. (well . . . he said he wanted a
simple rule, no elaborations)

David
September 28th 04, 11:20 PM
"John M. Williams" > wrote in message
...
> Tiger Hillside > wrote:
> > "Larry Hodges" > wrote:
> >>David wrote:
> >>> "John M. Williams" > wrote:
> >>>> Tiger Hillside > wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>>> I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting.
> >>>>> I have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before
> >>>>> and during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can
> >>>>> have some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>> 1) Make sure to warm up.
> >>>>> 2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
> >>>>> 3) Always use good form.
> >>>>> 4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
> >>>>> important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what %
> >>>>> of your single life amount you should use.)
> >>>>> 5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
> >>>>> muscles at a time.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> I have fewer for stretching and want more:
> >>>>>
> >>>>> 1) Stretch when warm.
> >>>>> 2) Don't bounce.
> >>>>> 3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
> >>>>> 4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but
> >>>>> remember I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.
> >>>>
> >>>> OK. "Just shut up and lift."
> >>>
> >>> I like "Shut the **** up and lift" better
> >>
> >>Shut the sam hell **** up and lift!
> >
> >Then what is the point of a newsgroup regarding weights?
>
> All our super-secret training tips are encoded into our off-topic
> posts and can be decrypted only by the truly worthy. You don't get
> the password yet.

And to be truly worthy he has to learn to ask for advice but not the precise
form in which it is to be given -

John M. Williams
September 29th 04, 12:12 AM
"David" > wrote:
>"John M. Williams" > wrote:
>> Tiger Hillside > wrote:
>> > "Larry Hodges" > wrote:
>> >>David wrote:
>> >>> "John M. Williams" > wrote:
>> >>>> Tiger Hillside > wrote:
>> >>>>
>> >>>>> I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting.
>> >>>>> I have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before
>> >>>>> and during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can
>> >>>>> have some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>> 1) Make sure to warm up.
>> >>>>> 2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>> >>>>> 3) Always use good form.
>> >>>>> 4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>> >>>>> important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what %
>> >>>>> of your single life amount you should use.)
>> >>>>> 5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
>> >>>>> muscles at a time.
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>> I have fewer for stretching and want more:
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>> 1) Stretch when warm.
>> >>>>> 2) Don't bounce.
>> >>>>> 3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
>> >>>>> 4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>> I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but
>> >>>>> remember I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.
>> >>>>
>> >>>> OK. "Just shut up and lift."
>> >>>
>> >>> I like "Shut the **** up and lift" better
>> >>
>> >>Shut the sam hell **** up and lift!
>> >
>> >Then what is the point of a newsgroup regarding weights?
>>
>> All our super-secret training tips are encoded into our off-topic
>> posts and can be decrypted only by the truly worthy. You don't get
>> the password yet.
>
>And to be truly worthy he has to learn to ask for advice but not the precise
>form in which it is to be given -

Dave! You're catching on! We're so proud!

Larry Hodges
September 29th 04, 12:21 AM
John M. Williams wrote:
> "David" > wrote:
>> "John M. Williams" > wrote:
>>> Tiger Hillside > wrote:
>>>> "Larry Hodges" > wrote:
>>>>> David wrote:
>>>>>> "John M. Williams" > wrote:
>>>>>>> Tiger Hillside > wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding
>>>>>>>> lifting. I have to say I have been amazed how much mental
>>>>>>>> work, but before and during the workout, lifting requires. It
>>>>>>>> will help me if I can have some list of things to remember.
>>>>>>>> Here is what I have so far:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> 1) Make sure to warm up.
>>>>>>>> 2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>>>>>>>> 3) Always use good form.
>>>>>>>> 4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>>>>>>>> important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and
>>>>>>>> what % of your single life amount you should use.)
>>>>>>>> 5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work
>>>>>>>> several muscles at a time.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> I have fewer for stretching and want more:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> 1) Stretch when warm.
>>>>>>>> 2) Don't bounce.
>>>>>>>> 3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
>>>>>>>> 4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but
>>>>>>>> remember I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> OK. "Just shut up and lift."
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I like "Shut the **** up and lift" better
>>>>>
>>>>> Shut the sam hell **** up and lift!
>>>>
>>>> Then what is the point of a newsgroup regarding weights?
>>>
>>> All our super-secret training tips are encoded into our off-topic
>>> posts and can be decrypted only by the truly worthy. You don't get
>>> the password yet.
>>
>> And to be truly worthy he has to learn to ask for advice but not the
>> precise form in which it is to be given -
>
> Dave! You're catching on! We're so proud!

Golf clap as we award him with a bottle of MD 20/20.
--
-Larry

David
September 29th 04, 01:06 AM
"John M. Williams" > wrote in message
...
> "David" > wrote:
> >"John M. Williams" > wrote:
> >> Tiger Hillside > wrote:
> >> > "Larry Hodges" > wrote:
> >> >>David wrote:
> >> >>> "John M. Williams" > wrote:
> >> >>>> Tiger Hillside > wrote:
> >> >>>>
> >> >>>>> I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding
lifting.
> >> >>>>> I have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before
> >> >>>>> and during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I
can
> >> >>>>> have some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
> >> >>>>>
> >> >>>>>
> >> >>>>> 1) Make sure to warm up.
> >> >>>>> 2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
> >> >>>>> 3) Always use good form.
> >> >>>>> 4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
> >> >>>>> important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what
%
> >> >>>>> of your single life amount you should use.)
> >> >>>>> 5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work
several
> >> >>>>> muscles at a time.
> >> >>>>>
> >> >>>>> I have fewer for stretching and want more:
> >> >>>>>
> >> >>>>> 1) Stretch when warm.
> >> >>>>> 2) Don't bounce.
> >> >>>>> 3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
> >> >>>>> 4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
> >> >>>>>
> >> >>>>> I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but
> >> >>>>> remember I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.
> >> >>>>
> >> >>>> OK. "Just shut up and lift."
> >> >>>
> >> >>> I like "Shut the **** up and lift" better
> >> >>
> >> >>Shut the sam hell **** up and lift!
> >> >
> >> >Then what is the point of a newsgroup regarding weights?
> >>
> >> All our super-secret training tips are encoded into our off-topic
> >> posts and can be decrypted only by the truly worthy. You don't get
> >> the password yet.
> >
> >And to be truly worthy he has to learn to ask for advice but not the
precise
> >form in which it is to be given -
>
> Dave! You're catching on! We're so proud!

I've had good teachers and learned at great personal sacrifice!

David
September 29th 04, 01:08 AM
"Larry Hodges" > wrote in message
...
> John M. Williams wrote:
> > "David" > wrote:
> >> "John M. Williams" > wrote:
> >>> Tiger Hillside > wrote:
> >>>> "Larry Hodges" > wrote:
> >>>>> David wrote:
> >>>>>> "John M. Williams" > wrote:
> >>>>>>> Tiger Hillside > wrote:
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>> I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding
> >>>>>>>> lifting. I have to say I have been amazed how much mental
> >>>>>>>> work, but before and during the workout, lifting requires. It
> >>>>>>>> will help me if I can have some list of things to remember.
> >>>>>>>> Here is what I have so far:
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>> 1) Make sure to warm up.
> >>>>>>>> 2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
> >>>>>>>> 3) Always use good form.
> >>>>>>>> 4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
> >>>>>>>> important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and
> >>>>>>>> what % of your single life amount you should use.)
> >>>>>>>> 5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work
> >>>>>>>> several muscles at a time.
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>> I have fewer for stretching and want more:
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>> 1) Stretch when warm.
> >>>>>>>> 2) Don't bounce.
> >>>>>>>> 3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
> >>>>>>>> 4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>> I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but
> >>>>>>>> remember I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>> OK. "Just shut up and lift."
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> I like "Shut the **** up and lift" better
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Shut the sam hell **** up and lift!
> >>>>
> >>>> Then what is the point of a newsgroup regarding weights?
> >>>
> >>> All our super-secret training tips are encoded into our off-topic
> >>> posts and can be decrypted only by the truly worthy. You don't get
> >>> the password yet.
> >>
> >> And to be truly worthy he has to learn to ask for advice but not the
> >> precise form in which it is to be given -
> >
> > Dave! You're catching on! We're so proud!
>
> Golf clap as we award him with a bottle of MD 20/20.
> --
> -Larry
>
Just send a coupla sawbucks and I'll be happy

David
September 29th 04, 01:15 AM
"Carl Nisarel" > wrote in message
...
> But heard, half-heard in the silliness, John M. Williams
> writes;
>
> > All our super-secret training tips are encoded into our
> > off-topic posts and can be decrypted only by the truly
> > worthy.
>
> Your egos are overblown and suffering from steriod-induced
> effects.

that's a fair assessment - we all take steroids here. They work great for
building massive egos .

John Hanson
September 29th 04, 02:00 AM
On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 15:39:37 GMT, Tiger Hillside
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

>I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting. I
>have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before and
>during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can have
>some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
>
>
>1) Make sure to warm up.
>2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>3) Always use good form.
>4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what % of
>your single life amount you should use.)
>5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
>muscles at a time.
>
6) If it feels heavy, add weight.

Tiger Hillside
September 29th 04, 02:08 AM
On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 21:14:21 GMT, "David" >
wrote:

>
>"Larry Hodges" > wrote in message
...
>> Tiger Hillside wrote:
>> > On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 11:10:48 -0700, "Larry Hodges"
>> > > wrote:
>> >
>> >> David wrote:
>> >>> "John M. Williams" > wrote in
>> >>> message ...
>> >>>> Tiger Hillside > wrote:
>> >>>>
>> >>>>> I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding
>> >>>>> lifting. I have to say I have been amazed how much mental work,
>> >>>>> but before and during the workout, lifting requires. It will help
>> >>>>> me if I can have some list of things to remember. Here is what I
>> >>>>> have so far:
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>> 1) Make sure to warm up.
>> >>>>> 2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>> >>>>> 3) Always use good form.
>> >>>>> 4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>> >>>>> important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what
>> >>>>> % of your single life amount you should use.)
>> >>>>> 5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work
>> >>>>> several muscles at a time.
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>> I have fewer for stretching and want more:
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>> 1) Stretch when warm.
>> >>>>> 2) Don't bounce.
>> >>>>> 3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
>> >>>>> 4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>> I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but
>> >>>>> remember I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.
>> >>>>
>> >>>> OK. "Just shut up and lift."
>> >>>
>> >>> I like "Shut the **** up and lift" better
>> >>
>> >> Shut the sam hell **** up and lift!
>> >
>> > Then what is the point of a newsgroup regarding weights?
>>
>> This branch of the thread deals more with the "misc" portion of mfw. We
>> trust you found our personal training tips helpful.
>> --
>> -Larry
>>
>Yes this is the 'inspirational' part of mfw. (well . . . he said he wanted a
>simple rule, no elaborations)

Rules, not elaboration*s*. The plurals are rather significant. I am
trying to see if I am understanding the discussions here. I don't
understand why that came across as arrogant, it certainly was not
intended that way. I wanted to see if I could distill some knowledge
to remind myself before lifting. A full discussion on the merits of
one kind of press vs. another is quite useful, but not as a reminder.

John M. Williams
September 29th 04, 02:17 AM
Carl Nisarel > bleated:

>But heard, half-heard in the silliness, John M. Williams
>writes;
>
>> All our super-secret training tips are encoded into our
>> off-topic posts and can be decrypted only by the truly
>> worthy.
>
>Your egos are overblown and suffering from steriod-induced
>effects.

You are an angry little man. It appears that we have upset you even
more. Maybe you should meditate or take a sedative or something.

elzinator
September 29th 04, 03:54 AM
On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 12:29:30 -0600, Keith Hobman wrote:
>In article >, Tiger Hillside
> wrote:
>
>> On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 11:10:48 -0700, "Larry Hodges"
>> > wrote:
>>
>> >David wrote:
>> >> "John M. Williams" > wrote in
>> >> message ...
>> >>> Tiger Hillside > wrote:
>> >>>
>> >>>> I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting.
>> >>>> I have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before
>> >>>> and during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can
>> >>>> have some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
>> >>>>
>> >>>>
>> >>>> 1) Make sure to warm up.
>> >>>> 2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>> >>>> 3) Always use good form.
>> >>>> 4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>> >>>> important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what %
>> >>>> of your single life amount you should use.)
>> >>>> 5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
>> >>>> muscles at a time.
>> >>>>
>> >>>> I have fewer for stretching and want more:
>> >>>>
>> >>>> 1) Stretch when warm.
>> >>>> 2) Don't bounce.
>> >>>> 3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
>> >>>> 4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
>> >>>>
>> >>>> I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but
>> >>>> remember I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.
>> >>>
>> >>> OK. "Just shut up and lift."
>> >>
>> >> I like "Shut the **** up and lift" better
>> >
>> >Shut the sam hell **** up and lift!
>>
>> Then what is the point of a newsgroup regarding weights?
>
>Dude - we're all about 'misc'.


Yep. There are an awful lot of misc.fits on this forum

:)


Beelzibub

"Modern man must rediscover a deeper source of his own spiritual life. To do this,he is obligated
to struggle with evil, to confront his own shadow, to integrate the devil."
- Carl Jung

David
September 29th 04, 04:02 AM
"elzinator" > wrote in message
...
> On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 12:29:30 -0600, Keith Hobman wrote:
> >In article >, Tiger Hillside
> > wrote:
> >
> >> On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 11:10:48 -0700, "Larry Hodges"
> >> > wrote:
> >>
> >> >David wrote:
> >> >> "John M. Williams" > wrote in
> >> >> message ...
> >> >>> Tiger Hillside > wrote:
> >> >>>
> >> >>>> I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding
lifting.
> >> >>>> I have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before
> >> >>>> and during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can
> >> >>>> have some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
> >> >>>>
> >> >>>>
> >> >>>> 1) Make sure to warm up.
> >> >>>> 2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
> >> >>>> 3) Always use good form.
> >> >>>> 4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
> >> >>>> important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what
%
> >> >>>> of your single life amount you should use.)
> >> >>>> 5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work
several
> >> >>>> muscles at a time.
> >> >>>>
> >> >>>> I have fewer for stretching and want more:
> >> >>>>
> >> >>>> 1) Stretch when warm.
> >> >>>> 2) Don't bounce.
> >> >>>> 3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
> >> >>>> 4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
> >> >>>>
> >> >>>> I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but
> >> >>>> remember I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.
> >> >>>
> >> >>> OK. "Just shut up and lift."
> >> >>
> >> >> I like "Shut the **** up and lift" better
> >> >
> >> >Shut the sam hell **** up and lift!
> >>
> >> Then what is the point of a newsgroup regarding weights?
> >
> >Dude - we're all about 'misc'.
>
>
> Yep. There are an awful lot of misc.fits on this forum

that is funny Elzi. There also a couple of Ms fits as well.

elzinator
September 29th 04, 04:02 AM
On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 20:00:48 -0500, John Hanson wrote:
>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 15:39:37 GMT, Tiger Hillside
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>
>>I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting. I
>>have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before and
>>during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can have
>>some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
>>
>>
>>1) Make sure to warm up.
>>2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>>3) Always use good form.
>>4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>>important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what % of
>>your single life amount you should use.)
>>5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
>>muscles at a time.
>>
>6) If it feels heavy, add weight.

7) Check your ego in at the door.



Beelzibub

"Modern man must rediscover a deeper source of his own spiritual life. To do this,he is obligated
to struggle with evil, to confront his own shadow, to integrate the devil."
- Carl Jung

elzinator
September 29th 04, 04:05 AM
On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 11:49:27 -0700, Larry Hodges wrote:
>Tiger Hillside wrote:
>> I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting. I
>> have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before and
>> during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can have
>> some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
>>
>>
>> 1) Make sure to warm up.
>> 2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>> 3) Always use good form.
>> 4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>> important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what % of
>> your single life amount you should use.)
>> 5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
>> muscles at a time.
>>
>> I have fewer for stretching and want more:
>>
>> 1) Stretch when warm.
>> 2) Don't bounce.
>> 3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
>> 4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
>>
>> I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but remember
>> I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.
>
>I'll address your stretching question.
>
>As Keith points out, bouncing is ballistic stretching. Static stretching is
>when you enter into a stretch and hold it, pushing the limits of your
>flexibility. This should only be done when warm.
>
>Personally, I use ballistic stretching to warm up. But I DO NOT try to
>increase flexibility, but rather simply warm up my muscles and joints with
>the movement, stretching well within my flexibility limitations. In fact, I
>don't attempt to even approach what I am capable of stretching at this
>point.
>
>After my workout, and I'm good and warm, I'll do static stretching if I want
>to increase my flexibility. I will enter a stretch to the point of it being
>uncomfortable and wait for a count of 10. By then, I've loosened up, so I
>push farther into the stretch and hold for another 10 count. Repeat again
>if you want. Let discomfort be your guide. You obviously will be
>experiencing discomfort since you're pushing the limits of your current
>flexibility, but it shouldn't hurt. Just remember, flexibility takes time
>and consistent regular stretching to avoid injury. It's not just muscle
>tissue, but all the connecting tissue and joints that you're pushing past
>comfortable limits.
>
>Some here argue that extreme flexibility is not necessarily a good thing for
>a weight lifter, their argument being limited flexibility protects the
>joints. I won't offer an opinion on this other than to say, for me, I like
>good flexibility. But then again, martial arts is my emphasis, so I don't
>fit the mold of just weight lifter. So take my advice with a grain of salt.

Or, to be more succinct:

there is static stretching, passive stretching, dynamic stretching and
'ballistic' stretching. Each has merits with the appropriate goal.

So, basically, your rules for stretching are irrelevant and not
correct.

How about a suggestion for a substitute:

Stretch what's tight.
Use warm-up reps/sets as stretching.


Beelzibub

"Modern man must rediscover a deeper source of his own spiritual life. To do this,he is obligated
to struggle with evil, to confront his own shadow, to integrate the devil."
- Carl Jung

Lyle McDonald
September 29th 04, 04:08 AM
John Hanson wrote:
> On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 22:02:41 -0500, elzinator
> > wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>
>
>>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 20:00:48 -0500, John Hanson wrote:
>>
>>>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 15:39:37 GMT, Tiger Hillside
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>>>
>>>
>>>>I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting. I
>>>>have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before and
>>>>during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can have
>>>>some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>1) Make sure to warm up.
>>>>2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>>>>3) Always use good form.
>>>>4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>>>>important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what % of
>>>>your single life amount you should use.)
>>>>5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
>>>>muscles at a time.
>>>>
>>>
>>>6) If it feels heavy, add weight.
>>
>>7) Check your ego in at the door.
>>
>
> Number 6 has nothing to do with ego if that is what you are implying.
> Try it once, you may be pleasantly surprised.

are you really this ****ing illiterate/moronic?

Lyle

John Hanson
September 29th 04, 04:10 AM
On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 22:02:41 -0500, elzinator
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 20:00:48 -0500, John Hanson wrote:
>>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 15:39:37 GMT, Tiger Hillside
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>>
>>>I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting. I
>>>have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before and
>>>during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can have
>>>some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
>>>
>>>
>>>1) Make sure to warm up.
>>>2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>>>3) Always use good form.
>>>4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>>>important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what % of
>>>your single life amount you should use.)
>>>5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
>>>muscles at a time.
>>>
>>6) If it feels heavy, add weight.
>
>7) Check your ego in at the door.
>
Number 6 has nothing to do with ego if that is what you are implying.
Try it once, you may be pleasantly surprised. I'm not talking 100
pounds either. Just 5 pounds might be sufficient. This concept might
even be something to research as I have a lot of anecdotal evidence to
support it. Having said that, number 7 is a very good rule.

Lyle McDonald
September 29th 04, 04:10 AM
elzinator wrote:

> there is static stretching, passive stretching, dynamic stretching and
> 'ballistic' stretching. Each has merits with the appropriate goal.

Ballistic is probably the one that has the least general usefulness.
And the highest risk.

Static stretching prior to training can decrease strength and power
output. In general, it should be reserved for afterwards as part of
developmental stretching (to increase flexibility).

Dynamic stretching (NOT the same as ballistic) is more appropriate as a
general rule of thumb as part of the warmup.

Lyle

elzinator
September 29th 04, 04:16 AM
On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 22:10:19 -0500, John Hanson wrote:
>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 22:02:41 -0500, elzinator
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>
>>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 20:00:48 -0500, John Hanson wrote:
>>>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 15:39:37 GMT, Tiger Hillside
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>>>
>>>>I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting. I
>>>>have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before and
>>>>during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can have
>>>>some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>1) Make sure to warm up.
>>>>2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>>>>3) Always use good form.
>>>>4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>>>>important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what % of
>>>>your single life amount you should use.)
>>>>5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
>>>>muscles at a time.
>>>>
>>>6) If it feels heavy, add weight.
>>
>>7) Check your ego in at the door.
>>
>Number 6 has nothing to do with ego if that is what you are implying.
>Try it once, you may be pleasantly surprised. I'm not talking 100
>pounds either. Just 5 pounds might be sufficient. This concept might
>even be something to research as I have a lot of anecdotal evidence to
>support it. Having said that, number 7 is a very good rule.


Dude, you are incredibly paranoid. Chill out.
My proposed rule was not in reply to yours.
sheesh


Beelzibub

"Modern man must rediscover a deeper source of his own spiritual life. To do this,he is obligated
to struggle with evil, to confront his own shadow, to integrate the devil."
- Carl Jung

John Hanson
September 29th 04, 04:17 AM
On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 21:08:25 -0600, Lyle McDonald
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

>John Hanson wrote:
>> On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 22:02:41 -0500, elzinator
>> > wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>>
>>
>>>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 20:00:48 -0500, John Hanson wrote:
>>>
>>>>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 15:39:37 GMT, Tiger Hillside
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting. I
>>>>>have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before and
>>>>>during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can have
>>>>>some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>1) Make sure to warm up.
>>>>>2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>>>>>3) Always use good form.
>>>>>4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>>>>>important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what % of
>>>>>your single life amount you should use.)
>>>>>5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
>>>>>muscles at a time.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>6) If it feels heavy, add weight.
>>>
>>>7) Check your ego in at the door.
>>>
>>
>> Number 6 has nothing to do with ego if that is what you are implying.
>> Try it once, you may be pleasantly surprised.
>
>are you really this ****ing illiterate/moronic?
>
Yes, I am.

John Hanson
September 29th 04, 04:21 AM
On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 22:16:13 -0500, elzinator
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 22:10:19 -0500, John Hanson wrote:
>>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 22:02:41 -0500, elzinator
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>>
>>>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 20:00:48 -0500, John Hanson wrote:
>>>>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 15:39:37 GMT, Tiger Hillside
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>>>>
>>>>>I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting. I
>>>>>have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before and
>>>>>during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can have
>>>>>some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>1) Make sure to warm up.
>>>>>2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>>>>>3) Always use good form.
>>>>>4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>>>>>important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what % of
>>>>>your single life amount you should use.)
>>>>>5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
>>>>>muscles at a time.
>>>>>
>>>>6) If it feels heavy, add weight.
>>>
>>>7) Check your ego in at the door.
>>>
>>Number 6 has nothing to do with ego if that is what you are implying.
>>Try it once, you may be pleasantly surprised. I'm not talking 100
>>pounds either. Just 5 pounds might be sufficient. This concept might
>>even be something to research as I have a lot of anecdotal evidence to
>>support it. Having said that, number 7 is a very good rule.
>
>
>Dude, you are incredibly paranoid. Chill out.
>My proposed rule was not in reply to yours.
>sheesh
>
Did I seem that way? I wasn't sure so I mentioned the whole implying
thing and how yours is a good rule. Anywho, what I failed to mention
is that this only seems to apply to squats with me. Others have had
the occasional response with deadlifts and even rarer is the response
to adding weight when if feels heavy to bench.

David
September 29th 04, 04:22 AM
"John Hanson" > wrote in message
...
> On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 21:08:25 -0600, Lyle McDonald
> > wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>
> >John Hanson wrote:
> >> On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 22:02:41 -0500, elzinator
> >> > wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
> >>
> >>
> >>>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 20:00:48 -0500, John Hanson wrote:
> >>>
> >>>>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 15:39:37 GMT, Tiger Hillside
> > wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>>I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting. I
> >>>>>have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before and
> >>>>>during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can have
> >>>>>some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>1) Make sure to warm up.
> >>>>>2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
> >>>>>3) Always use good form.
> >>>>>4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
> >>>>>important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what %
of
> >>>>>your single life amount you should use.)
> >>>>>5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
> >>>>>muscles at a time.
> >>>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>6) If it feels heavy, add weight.
> >>>
> >>>7) Check your ego in at the door.
> >>>
> >>
> >> Number 6 has nothing to do with ego if that is what you are implying.
> >> Try it once, you may be pleasantly surprised.
> >
> >are you really this ****ing illiterate/moronic?
> >
> Yes, I am.

I am slightly retarded as well. John, could it be we are in the wrong
newsgroup?

John Hanson
September 29th 04, 04:48 AM
On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 03:22:25 GMT, "David" >
wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

>
>"John Hanson" > wrote in message
...
>> On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 21:08:25 -0600, Lyle McDonald
>> > wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>>
>> >John Hanson wrote:
>> >> On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 22:02:41 -0500, elzinator
>> >> > wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 20:00:48 -0500, John Hanson wrote:
>> >>>
>> >>>>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 15:39:37 GMT, Tiger Hillside
>> > wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>> >>>>
>> >>>>
>> >>>>>I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting. I
>> >>>>>have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before and
>> >>>>>during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can have
>> >>>>>some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>>1) Make sure to warm up.
>> >>>>>2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>> >>>>>3) Always use good form.
>> >>>>>4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>> >>>>>important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what %
>of
>> >>>>>your single life amount you should use.)
>> >>>>>5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
>> >>>>>muscles at a time.
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>
>> >>>>6) If it feels heavy, add weight.
>> >>>
>> >>>7) Check your ego in at the door.
>> >>>
>> >>
>> >> Number 6 has nothing to do with ego if that is what you are implying.
>> >> Try it once, you may be pleasantly surprised.
>> >
>> >are you really this ****ing illiterate/moronic?
>> >
>> Yes, I am.
>
>I am slightly retarded as well. John, could it be we are in the wrong
>newsgroup?
>
Could be.

On a different note, I had a fairly uneventful weekend duck hunting
but was very happy with Buddy on the second day. He did very well but
I had to lead him to the area where the duck fell but he found them
right away. Here he is retrieving a duck he had already retrieved:
http://northernlinks.com/yohan/BuddyRetrieve.jpg

He got ****ed when a swan flew over and I didn't shoot. He started
whining and barking so I threw one of the duck he had previously
gotten into the creek. This from a dog that was running off and
hiding under my truck the night before when I was shooting my CETME
and M-1 Carbine.

Back to a weights note, I have found a better exercise than sled
dragging, It's called slogging through weeds in neoprene waders
looking for downed ducks. But, don't ever get caught in an area where
there was once woods as the tree stumps and roots turn to "quicksand".
I was so ****ing ****ed when my left leg slipped nearly to it's knee
into that **** and I couldn't get it out for about 10 minutes. I
slammed the butt of my shotgun down so hard I'm surprised that it
didn't fire (of course not, it's a Benelli). This is the easy **** I
had to "walk" through:
http://northernlinks.com/yohan/Tim****ing.jpg

I was so hot and so soaked with sweat, I stripped off all my clothes
except my waders and dunked myself multiple times into the creek after
I got out of that ****. It was good fun though!?

Tiger Hillside
September 29th 04, 05:28 AM
On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 20:00:48 -0500, John Hanson
> wrote:

>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 15:39:37 GMT, Tiger Hillside
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>
>>I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting. I
>>have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before and
>>during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can have
>>some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
>>
>>
>>1) Make sure to warm up.
>>2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>>3) Always use good form.
>>4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>>important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what % of
>>your single life amount you should use.)
>>5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
>>muscles at a time.
>>
>6) If it feels heavy, add weight.

I think I have experienced this on occasion. I know I have had good
days where I started out dead tired.

But I am still making rule 3 more important.

John Hanson
September 29th 04, 05:36 AM
On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 04:28:08 GMT, Tiger Hillside
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 20:00:48 -0500, John Hanson
> wrote:
>
>>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 15:39:37 GMT, Tiger Hillside
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>>
>>>I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting. I
>>>have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before and
>>>during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can have
>>>some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
>>>
>>>
>>>1) Make sure to warm up.
>>>2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>>>3) Always use good form.
>>>4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>>>important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what % of
>>>your single life amount you should use.)
>>>5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
>>>muscles at a time.
>>>
>>6) If it feels heavy, add weight.
>
>I think I have experienced this on occasion. I know I have had good
>days where I started out dead tired.
>
This has nothing to do with being dead tired. That's a whole
different animal.


>But I am still making rule 3 more important.
>
>
As is number 7.

John Hanson
September 29th 04, 05:41 AM
On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 22:48:43 -0500, John Hanson
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:


>
>Back to a weights note, I have found a better exercise than sled
>dragging, It's called slogging through weeds in neoprene waders
>looking for downed ducks. But, don't ever get caught in an area where
>there was once woods as the tree stumps and roots turn to "quicksand".
>I was so ****ing ****ed when my left leg slipped nearly to it's knee
>into that **** and I couldn't get it out for about 10 minutes. I
>slammed the butt of my shotgun down so hard I'm surprised that it
>didn't fire (of course not, it's a Benelli). This is the easy **** I
>had to "walk" through:
>http://northernlinks.com/yohan/Tim****ing.jpg
>
One thing I failed to mention is that I did this on both Saturday and
Sunday with Sunday the more stressful day. Monday I squatted and I
felt so strong I felt I could have squatted 600 in a suit and
wraps...or just waders:-)

John M. Williams
September 29th 04, 06:48 AM
Carl Nisarel > wrote:

>But heard, half-heard in the silliness, John M. Williams
>writes;
>
>> Carl Nisarel > bleated:
>>
>>>But heard, half-heard in the silliness, John M. Williams
>>>writes;
>>>
>>>> All our super-secret training tips are encoded into our
>>>> off-topic posts and can be decrypted only by the truly
>>>> worthy.
>>>
>>>Your egos are overblown and suffering from steriod-induced
>>>effects.
>>
>> You are an angry little man.
>
>No, I'm quite happy and I'm laughing my ass off at you and
>idiots like you.

Whatever you say, Carl. I'm sure you've had quite an exhausting day
after posting 41 messages in this newsgroup when you don't even lift
weights, not to mention the frustrating time you must have spent in
Google Groups, hunting for a non-existent statement that you claimed I
made.

Whatever delusions you need to harbor in order to sleep at night are
OK by me.

Larry Hodges
September 29th 04, 08:17 AM
elzinator wrote:
> On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 11:49:27 -0700, Larry Hodges wrote:
>> Tiger Hillside wrote:
>>> I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting.
>>> I have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before
>>> and during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can
>>> have some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
>>>
>>>
>>> 1) Make sure to warm up.
>>> 2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>>> 3) Always use good form.
>>> 4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>>> important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what %
>>> of your single life amount you should use.)
>>> 5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
>>> muscles at a time.
>>>
>>> I have fewer for stretching and want more:
>>>
>>> 1) Stretch when warm.
>>> 2) Don't bounce.
>>> 3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
>>> 4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
>>>
>>> I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but
>>> remember I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.
>>
>> I'll address your stretching question.
>>
>> As Keith points out, bouncing is ballistic stretching. Static
>> stretching is when you enter into a stretch and hold it, pushing the
>> limits of your flexibility. This should only be done when warm.
>>
>> Personally, I use ballistic stretching to warm up. But I DO NOT try
>> to increase flexibility, but rather simply warm up my muscles and
>> joints with the movement, stretching well within my flexibility
>> limitations. In fact, I don't attempt to even approach what I am
>> capable of stretching at this point.
>>
>> After my workout, and I'm good and warm, I'll do static stretching
>> if I want to increase my flexibility. I will enter a stretch to the
>> point of it being uncomfortable and wait for a count of 10. By
>> then, I've loosened up, so I push farther into the stretch and hold
>> for another 10 count. Repeat again if you want. Let discomfort be
>> your guide. You obviously will be experiencing discomfort since
>> you're pushing the limits of your current flexibility, but it
>> shouldn't hurt. Just remember, flexibility takes time and
>> consistent regular stretching to avoid injury. It's not just muscle
>> tissue, but all the connecting tissue and joints that you're pushing
>> past comfortable limits.
>>
>> Some here argue that extreme flexibility is not necessarily a good
>> thing for a weight lifter, their argument being limited flexibility
>> protects the joints. I won't offer an opinion on this other than to
>> say, for me, I like good flexibility. But then again, martial arts
>> is my emphasis, so I don't fit the mold of just weight lifter. So
>> take my advice with a grain of salt.
>
> Or, to be more succinct:
>
> there is static stretching, passive stretching, dynamic stretching and
> 'ballistic' stretching. Each has merits with the appropriate goal.
>
> So, basically, your rules for stretching are irrelevant and not
> correct.
>
> How about a suggestion for a substitute:
>
> Stretch what's tight.
> Use warm-up reps/sets as stretching.
>
>
> Beelzibub
>
> "Modern man must rediscover a deeper source of his own spiritual
> life. To do this,he is obligated to struggle with evil, to confront
> his own shadow, to integrate the devil." - Carl Jung

Hey, don't be anal! Like I said, it works for me.

Shoulda been here today Elzi. 82, sunny...perfect Portland day. Definitely
one to write home about.
--
-Larry

David
September 29th 04, 09:34 AM
"John Hanson" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 03:22:25 GMT, "David" >
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>


[......]

> >
> >I am slightly retarded as well. John, could it be we are in the wrong
> >newsgroup?
> >
> Could be.
>
> On a different note, I had a fairly uneventful weekend duck hunting
> but was very happy with Buddy on the second day. He did very well but
> I had to lead him to the area where the duck fell but he found them
> right away. Here he is retrieving a duck he had already retrieved:
> http://northernlinks.com/yohan/BuddyRetrieve.jpg
>
> He got ****ed when a swan flew over and I didn't shoot. He started
> whining and barking so I threw one of the duck he had previously
> gotten into the creek. This from a dog that was running off and
> hiding under my truck the night before when I was shooting my CETME
> and M-1 Carbine.
>
> Back to a weights note, I have found a better exercise than sled
> dragging, It's called slogging through weeds in neoprene waders
> looking for downed ducks. But, don't ever get caught in an area where
> there was once woods as the tree stumps and roots turn to "quicksand".
> I was so ****ing ****ed when my left leg slipped nearly to it's knee
> into that **** and I couldn't get it out for about 10 minutes. I
> slammed the butt of my shotgun down so hard I'm surprised that it
> didn't fire (of course not, it's a Benelli). This is the easy **** I
> had to "walk" through:
> http://northernlinks.com/yohan/Tim****ing.jpg
>
> I was so hot and so soaked with sweat, I stripped off all my clothes
> except my waders and dunked myself multiple times into the creek after
> I got out of that ****. It was good fun though!?
>
>
> Buddy got ****ed! LOL! Guess you guys know each other pretty well - Good
looking animal! Jesus don;t tell me you;ve got quicksand around there -
that is scary ****! (Just as well you know what you're doing) Tim ****ing -
ha ha - looks like there would be some reptiles in that scrub!? You wouldn't
get this city boy in there! Still it looks like a great time and must be a
good thing to drop out like that - that's the spot that's a two hours drive
away? Thanks for sending


>
>
>

Helgi Briem
September 29th 04, 11:04 AM
On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 22:48:43 -0500, John Hanson
> wrote:

>I was so hot and so soaked with sweat, I stripped off all my clothes
>except my waders and dunked myself multiple times into the
> creek after I got out of that ****. It was good fun though!?

Please do not, I repeat *not* send jpegs.

--
Helgi Briem hbriem AT simnet DOT is

"Don't worry about it, son. God is just messing with your head."

David
September 29th 04, 12:02 PM
"Tiger Hillside" > wrote in message
...
> On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 21:14:21 GMT, "David" >
> wrote:
>
> >
> >"Larry Hodges" > wrote in message
> ...
> >> Tiger Hillside wrote:
> >> > On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 11:10:48 -0700, "Larry Hodges"
> >> > > wrote:
> >> >
> >> >> David wrote:
> >> >>> "John M. Williams" > wrote in
> >> >>> message ...
> >> >>>> Tiger Hillside > wrote:
> >> >>>>
> >> >>>>> I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding
> >> >>>>> lifting. I have to say I have been amazed how much mental work,
> >> >>>>> but before and during the workout, lifting requires. It will help
> >> >>>>> me if I can have some list of things to remember. Here is what I
> >> >>>>> have so far:
> >> >>>>>
> >> >>>>>
> >> >>>>> 1) Make sure to warm up.
> >> >>>>> 2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
> >> >>>>> 3) Always use good form.
> >> >>>>> 4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
> >> >>>>> important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what
> >> >>>>> % of your single life amount you should use.)
> >> >>>>> 5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work
> >> >>>>> several muscles at a time.
> >> >>>>>
> >> >>>>> I have fewer for stretching and want more:
> >> >>>>>
> >> >>>>> 1) Stretch when warm.
> >> >>>>> 2) Don't bounce.
> >> >>>>> 3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
> >> >>>>> 4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
> >> >>>>>
> >> >>>>> I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but
> >> >>>>> remember I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.
> >> >>>>
> >> >>>> OK. "Just shut up and lift."
> >> >>>
> >> >>> I like "Shut the **** up and lift" better
> >> >>
> >> >> Shut the sam hell **** up and lift!
> >> >
> >> > Then what is the point of a newsgroup regarding weights?
> >>
> >> This branch of the thread deals more with the "misc" portion of mfw.
We
> >> trust you found our personal training tips helpful.
> >> --
> >> -Larry
> >>
> >Yes this is the 'inspirational' part of mfw. (well . . . he said he
wanted a
> >simple rule, no elaborations)
>
> Rules, not elaboration*s*. The plurals are rather significant. I am
> trying to see if I am understanding the discussions here. I don't
> understand why that came across as arrogant, it certainly was not
> intended that way. I wanted to see if I could distill some knowledge
> to remind myself before lifting. A full discussion on the merits of
> one kind of press vs. another is quite useful, but not as a reminder.

You weren't arrogant at all. It's just in this group you'll find that
satisfaction isn't always guaranteed

John Hanson
September 29th 04, 01:23 PM
On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 08:34:03 GMT, "David" >
wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

>
>"John Hanson" > wrote in message
...
>> On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 03:22:25 GMT, "David" >
>> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>>
>
>
>[......]
>
>> >
>> >I am slightly retarded as well. John, could it be we are in the wrong
>> >newsgroup?
>> >
>> Could be.
>>
>> On a different note, I had a fairly uneventful weekend duck hunting
>> but was very happy with Buddy on the second day. He did very well but
>> I had to lead him to the area where the duck fell but he found them
>> right away. Here he is retrieving a duck he had already retrieved:
>> http://northernlinks.com/yohan/BuddyRetrieve.jpg
>>
>> He got ****ed when a swan flew over and I didn't shoot. He started
>> whining and barking so I threw one of the duck he had previously
>> gotten into the creek. This from a dog that was running off and
>> hiding under my truck the night before when I was shooting my CETME
>> and M-1 Carbine.
>>
>> Back to a weights note, I have found a better exercise than sled
>> dragging, It's called slogging through weeds in neoprene waders
>> looking for downed ducks. But, don't ever get caught in an area where
>> there was once woods as the tree stumps and roots turn to "quicksand".
>> I was so ****ing ****ed when my left leg slipped nearly to it's knee
>> into that **** and I couldn't get it out for about 10 minutes. I
>> slammed the butt of my shotgun down so hard I'm surprised that it
>> didn't fire (of course not, it's a Benelli). This is the easy **** I
>> had to "walk" through:
>> http://northernlinks.com/yohan/Tim****ing.jpg
>>
>> I was so hot and so soaked with sweat, I stripped off all my clothes
>> except my waders and dunked myself multiple times into the creek after
>> I got out of that ****. It was good fun though!?
>>
>>
>> Buddy got ****ed! LOL! Guess you guys know each other pretty well - Good
>looking animal! Jesus don;t tell me you;ve got quicksand around there -
>that is scary ****! (Just as well you know what you're doing) Tim ****ing -
>ha ha - looks like there would be some reptiles in that scrub!? You wouldn't
>get this city boy in there! Still it looks like a great time and must be a
>good thing to drop out like that - that's the spot that's a two hours drive
>away? Thanks for sending
>
>
Actually, this is a totally different area. This is land my buddy Tim
owns and it's northwest of me. It's only about a 90 minute drive.
I've duck hunted every opener there for the last 12 years.

It's not quicksand, it's muck. Wherever there was stumps or trees,
the wood has rotted out and made a very loose "base" that will cause a
person to sink and it is extremely difficult to free yourself while
wearing waders.

John Hanson
September 29th 04, 01:24 PM
On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 10:04:54 +0000, Helgi Briem
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 22:48:43 -0500, John Hanson
> wrote:
>
>>I was so hot and so soaked with sweat, I stripped off all my clothes
>>except my waders and dunked myself multiple times into the
>> creek after I got out of that ****. It was good fun though!?
>
>Please do not, I repeat *not* send jpegs.

Hehe. I don't have any but you have to remember that the waders go up
to my pecs so you wouldn't have seen much.

Tiger Hillside
September 29th 04, 02:08 PM
On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 11:02:42 GMT, "David" >
wrote:

>
>"Tiger Hillside" > wrote in message
...
>> On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 21:14:21 GMT, "David" >
>> wrote:
>>
>> >
>> >"Larry Hodges" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> >> Tiger Hillside wrote:
>> >> > On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 11:10:48 -0700, "Larry Hodges"
>> >> > > wrote:
>> >> >
>> >> >> David wrote:
>> >> >>> "John M. Williams" > wrote in
>> >> >>> message ...
>> >> >>>> Tiger Hillside > wrote:
>> >> >>>>
>> >> >>>>> I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding
>> >> >>>>> lifting. I have to say I have been amazed how much mental work,
>> >> >>>>> but before and during the workout, lifting requires. It will help
>> >> >>>>> me if I can have some list of things to remember. Here is what I
>> >> >>>>> have so far:
>> >> >>>>>
>> >> >>>>>
>> >> >>>>> 1) Make sure to warm up.
>> >> >>>>> 2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>> >> >>>>> 3) Always use good form.
>> >> >>>>> 4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>> >> >>>>> important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what
>> >> >>>>> % of your single life amount you should use.)
>> >> >>>>> 5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work
>> >> >>>>> several muscles at a time.
>> >> >>>>>
>> >> >>>>> I have fewer for stretching and want more:
>> >> >>>>>
>> >> >>>>> 1) Stretch when warm.
>> >> >>>>> 2) Don't bounce.
>> >> >>>>> 3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
>> >> >>>>> 4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
>> >> >>>>>
>> >> >>>>> I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but
>> >> >>>>> remember I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.
>> >> >>>>
>> >> >>>> OK. "Just shut up and lift."
>> >> >>>
>> >> >>> I like "Shut the **** up and lift" better
>> >> >>
>> >> >> Shut the sam hell **** up and lift!
>> >> >
>> >> > Then what is the point of a newsgroup regarding weights?
>> >>
>> >> This branch of the thread deals more with the "misc" portion of mfw.
>We
>> >> trust you found our personal training tips helpful.
>> >> --
>> >> -Larry
>> >>
>> >Yes this is the 'inspirational' part of mfw. (well . . . he said he
>wanted a
>> >simple rule, no elaborations)
>>
>> Rules, not elaboration*s*. The plurals are rather significant. I am
>> trying to see if I am understanding the discussions here. I don't
>> understand why that came across as arrogant, it certainly was not
>> intended that way. I wanted to see if I could distill some knowledge
>> to remind myself before lifting. A full discussion on the merits of
>> one kind of press vs. another is quite useful, but not as a reminder.
>
>You weren't arrogant at all. It's just in this group you'll find that
>satisfaction isn't always guaranteed

Then I have to disappoint you in that I have been quite satisfied by
my overall experience in the group. I have learned much that is
useful.


*Well not actually disappoint, but it sounded good.

Tiger Hillside
September 29th 04, 02:09 PM
On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 10:04:54 +0000, Helgi Briem
> wrote:

>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 22:48:43 -0500, John Hanson
> wrote:
>
>>I was so hot and so soaked with sweat, I stripped off all my clothes
>>except my waders and dunked myself multiple times into the
>> creek after I got out of that ****. It was good fun though!?
>
>Please do not, I repeat *not* send jpegs.

Maybe you will be lucky and it will be one of the Trojan jpegs. As
close as you can get to whipping the image from your mind.

Tiger Hillside
September 29th 04, 02:10 PM
On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 23:36:09 -0500, John Hanson
> wrote:

>On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 04:28:08 GMT, Tiger Hillside
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>
>>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 20:00:48 -0500, John Hanson
> wrote:
>>
>>>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 15:39:37 GMT, Tiger Hillside
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>>>
>>>>I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting. I
>>>>have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before and
>>>>during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can have
>>>>some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>1) Make sure to warm up.
>>>>2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>>>>3) Always use good form.
>>>>4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>>>>important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what % of
>>>>your single life amount you should use.)
>>>>5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
>>>>muscles at a time.
>>>>
>>>6) If it feels heavy, add weight.
>>
>>I think I have experienced this on occasion. I know I have had good
>>days where I started out dead tired.
>>
>This has nothing to do with being dead tired. That's a whole
>different animal.

Ok. I will try this some day.
>
>>But I am still making rule 3 more important.
>>
>>
>As is number 7.

When I get some ego in this area I will try to keep it out of my way.

Tiger Hillside
September 29th 04, 03:14 PM
On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 22:05:43 -0500, elzinator
> wrote:

[snip]

>Or, to be more succinct:
>
>there is static stretching, passive stretching, dynamic stretching and
>'ballistic' stretching. Each has merits with the appropriate goal.
>
>So, basically, your rules for stretching are irrelevant and not
>correct.

Which was I suspected. I know I am not doing it right.

>How about a suggestion for a substitute:
>
>Stretch what's tight.
>Use warm-up reps/sets as stretching.

Makes sense. I need more as well, but this helps.

Tiger Hillside
September 29th 04, 03:19 PM
On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 00:17:49 -0700, "Larry Hodges"
> wrote:

[snip]

>Shoulda been here today Elzi. 82, sunny...perfect Portland day. Definitely
>one to write home about.

Yuck. Give me 65 any day, 50 if I am going to be on a bike or on a
hike (rhyme not deliberate). I get to wear a jacket and jeans and
breath properly.

Proton Soup
September 29th 04, 03:29 PM
On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 14:19:53 GMT, Tiger Hillside
> wrote:

>On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 00:17:49 -0700, "Larry Hodges"
> wrote:
>
>[snip]
>
>>Shoulda been here today Elzi. 82, sunny...perfect Portland day. Definitely
>>one to write home about.
>
>Yuck. Give me 65 any day, 50 if I am going to be on a bike or on a
>hike (rhyme not deliberate). I get to wear a jacket and jeans and
>breath properly.

If you need that much clothing at those temps, then you're going for a
walk, not a hike.

-----------
Proton Soup

"Homo sapiens non urinat in ventum."

DRS
September 29th 04, 03:34 PM
"elzinator" > wrote in message


[...]

> So, basically, your rules for stretching are irrelevant and not
> correct.
>
> How about a suggestion for a substitute:
>
> Stretch what's tight.
> Use warm-up reps/sets as stretching.

Or even:

Dynamic stretch before; static stretch after.

--

"Self-delusion as a coping tool has always been a fairly useful strategy for
me."
Dally

Tiger Hillside
September 29th 04, 04:35 PM
On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 09:29:35 -0500, Proton Soup >
wrote:

>On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 14:19:53 GMT, Tiger Hillside
> wrote:
>
>>On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 00:17:49 -0700, "Larry Hodges"
> wrote:
>>
>>[snip]
>>
>>>Shoulda been here today Elzi. 82, sunny...perfect Portland day. Definitely
>>>one to write home about.
>>
>>Yuck. Give me 65 any day, 50 if I am going to be on a bike or on a
>>hike (rhyme not deliberate). I get to wear a jacket and jeans and
>>breath properly.
>
>If you need that much clothing at those temps, then you're going for a
>walk, not a hike.

Well, yeah. Actually I don't tend to get cold. My primary jacket above
freezing is a simply denim.

rick++
September 29th 04, 05:12 PM
> Then what is the point of a newsgroup regarding weights?

To talk about drugs and insult anyone skinnier than onesself.

spodosaurus
September 29th 04, 06:13 PM
Larry Hodges wrote:
> Tiger Hillside wrote:
>
>>I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting. I
>>have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before and
>>during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can have
>>some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
>>
>>
>>1) Make sure to warm up.
>>2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>>3) Always use good form.
>>4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>>important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what % of
>>your single life amount you should use.)
>>5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
>>muscles at a time.
>>
>>I have fewer for stretching and want more:
>>
>>1) Stretch when warm.
>>2) Don't bounce.
>>3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
>>4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
>>
>>I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but remember
>>I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.
>
>
> I'll address your stretching question.
>
> As Keith points out, bouncing is ballistic stretching. Static stretching is
> when you enter into a stretch and hold it, pushing the limits of your
> flexibility. This should only be done when warm.
>
> Personally, I use ballistic stretching to warm up. But I DO NOT try to
> increase flexibility, but rather simply warm up my muscles and joints with
> the movement, stretching well within my flexibility limitations. In fact, I
> don't attempt to even approach what I am capable of stretching at this
> point.
>

I thought there was ballistic, static, and dynamic, with there being
some difference between bellistic (using inertia to stretch you) and
dynamic (moving the joints through ranges of motion to improve
flexibility under control). Or are ballistic and dynamic the same things?


--
spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

Elzinator
September 29th 04, 07:36 PM
"Larry Hodges" > wrote in message >...
> elzinator wrote:
> > On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 11:49:27 -0700, Larry Hodges wrote:

> >> After my workout, and I'm good and warm, I'll do static stretching
> >> if I want to increase my flexibility. I will enter a stretch to the
> >> point of it being uncomfortable and wait for a count of 10. By
> >> then, I've loosened up, so I push farther into the stretch and hold
> >> for another 10 count. Repeat again if you want. Let discomfort be
> >> your guide. You obviously will be experiencing discomfort since
> >> you're pushing the limits of your current flexibility, but it
> >> shouldn't hurt. Just remember, flexibility takes time and
> >> consistent regular stretching to avoid injury. It's not just muscle
> >> tissue, but all the connecting tissue and joints that you're pushing
> >> past comfortable limits.
> >>
> >> Some here argue that extreme flexibility is not necessarily a good
> >> thing for a weight lifter, their argument being limited flexibility
> >> protects the joints. I won't offer an opinion on this other than to
> >> say, for me, I like good flexibility. But then again, martial arts
> >> is my emphasis, so I don't fit the mold of just weight lifter. So
> >> take my advice with a grain of salt.
> >
> > Or, to be more succinct:
> >
> > there is static stretching, passive stretching, dynamic stretching and
> > 'ballistic' stretching. Each has merits with the appropriate goal.
> >
> > So, basically, your rules for stretching are irrelevant and not
> > correct.
> >
> > How about a suggestion for a substitute:
> >
> > Stretch what's tight.
> > Use warm-up reps/sets as stretching.
> >
>>
> Hey, don't be anal! Like I said, it works for me.

I'm obsessive, not anal.

And remember, what works for you may not for everyone.

> Shoulda been here today Elzi. 82, sunny...perfect Portland day. Definitely
> one to write home about.

I like it at 85, sunny and day.
We had a beauty of a full moon laslt night, though.
Oh yeah...

Larry Hodges
September 29th 04, 07:48 PM
spodosaurus wrote:
> Larry Hodges wrote:
>> Tiger Hillside wrote:
>>
>>> I am trying to develop a set of "rules of thumb" regarding lifting.
>>> I have to say I have been amazed how much mental work, but before
>>> and during the workout, lifting requires. It will help me if I can
>>> have some list of things to remember. Here is what I have so far:
>>>
>>>
>>> 1) Make sure to warm up.
>>> 2) Get form down before you work on putting on heavy weights.
>>> 3) Always use good form.
>>> 4) The amount you lift should be heavy, but rule three is more
>>> important. (There is significant debate on how many reps and what %
>>> of your single life amount you should use.)
>>> 5) It is better, unless you have some specific need, to work several
>>> muscles at a time.
>>>
>>> I have fewer for stretching and want more:
>>>
>>> 1) Stretch when warm.
>>> 2) Don't bounce.
>>> 3) Hold the stretch for 15-20 seconds.
>>> 4) Unlike lifting it is better to stretch one muscle at a time.
>>>
>>> I would appreciate any and all additions or corrections, but
>>> remember I want these as simple rules, not full elaborations.
>>
>>
>> I'll address your stretching question.
>>
>> As Keith points out, bouncing is ballistic stretching. Static
>> stretching is when you enter into a stretch and hold it, pushing the
>> limits of your flexibility. This should only be done when warm.
>>
>> Personally, I use ballistic stretching to warm up. But I DO NOT try
>> to increase flexibility, but rather simply warm up my muscles and
>> joints with the movement, stretching well within my flexibility
>> limitations. In fact, I don't attempt to even approach what I am
>> capable of stretching at this point.
>>
>
> I thought there was ballistic, static, and dynamic, with there being
> some difference between bellistic (using inertia to stretch you) and
> dynamic (moving the joints through ranges of motion to improve
> flexibility under control). Or are ballistic and dynamic the same
> things?

Actually, what I call ballistic stretching is really dynamic stretching.
It's just back in the '78 when I started martial arts, that's what we called
it. Never the less, I should know better than to post improper terminology
here. Elzi was right to call me on it.

Go here for complete "accurate" definitions of stretching types:

http://www.bath.ac.uk/~masrjb/Stretch/stretching_4.html

I never, ever do ballistic stretching as it's defined here.
--
-Larry

Larry Hodges
September 29th 04, 07:54 PM
Elzinator wrote:
> "Larry Hodges" > wrote in message
> >...
>> elzinator wrote:
>>> On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 11:49:27 -0700, Larry Hodges wrote:
>
>>>> After my workout, and I'm good and warm, I'll do static stretching
>>>> if I want to increase my flexibility. I will enter a stretch to
>>>> the point of it being uncomfortable and wait for a count of 10. By
>>>> then, I've loosened up, so I push farther into the stretch and hold
>>>> for another 10 count. Repeat again if you want. Let discomfort be
>>>> your guide. You obviously will be experiencing discomfort since
>>>> you're pushing the limits of your current flexibility, but it
>>>> shouldn't hurt. Just remember, flexibility takes time and
>>>> consistent regular stretching to avoid injury. It's not just
>>>> muscle tissue, but all the connecting tissue and joints that
>>>> you're pushing past comfortable limits.
>>>>
>>>> Some here argue that extreme flexibility is not necessarily a good
>>>> thing for a weight lifter, their argument being limited flexibility
>>>> protects the joints. I won't offer an opinion on this other than
>>>> to say, for me, I like good flexibility. But then again, martial
>>>> arts is my emphasis, so I don't fit the mold of just weight
>>>> lifter. So take my advice with a grain of salt.
>>>
>>> Or, to be more succinct:
>>>
>>> there is static stretching, passive stretching, dynamic stretching
>>> and 'ballistic' stretching. Each has merits with the appropriate
>>> goal.
>>>
>>> So, basically, your rules for stretching are irrelevant and not
>>> correct.
>>>
>>> How about a suggestion for a substitute:
>>>
>>> Stretch what's tight.
>>> Use warm-up reps/sets as stretching.
>>>
>>>
>> Hey, don't be anal! Like I said, it works for me.
>
> I'm obsessive, not anal.

There's a difference?

> And remember, what works for you may not for everyone.

I stand corrected on my terminology, thank you very much.

>> Shoulda been here today Elzi. 82, sunny...perfect Portland day.
>> Definitely one to write home about.
>
> I like it at 85, sunny and day.
> We had a beauty of a full moon laslt night, though.
> Oh yeah...

I love the sun, hate the rain. Why am I in Oregon? Who the **** knows. If
my kids weren't here, I'd be gone in a flash.

Or maybe I stay because I'd miss my ex? *NOT*
--
-Larry

David
September 29th 04, 08:23 PM
"John Hanson" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 08:34:03 GMT, "David" >
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>
> >
> >"John Hanson" > wrote in message
> ...
> >> On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 03:22:25 GMT, "David" >
> >> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
> >>
> >
> >
> >[......]
> >
> >> >
> >> >I am slightly retarded as well. John, could it be we are in the wrong
> >> >newsgroup?
> >> >
> >> Could be.
> >>
> >> On a different note, I had a fairly uneventful weekend duck hunting
> >> but was very happy with Buddy on the second day. He did very well but
> >> I had to lead him to the area where the duck fell but he found them
> >> right away. Here he is retrieving a duck he had already retrieved:
> >> http://northernlinks.com/yohan/BuddyRetrieve.jpg
> >>
> >> He got ****ed when a swan flew over and I didn't shoot. He started
> >> whining and barking so I threw one of the duck he had previously
> >> gotten into the creek. This from a dog that was running off and
> >> hiding under my truck the night before when I was shooting my CETME
> >> and M-1 Carbine.
> >>
> >> Back to a weights note, I have found a better exercise than sled
> >> dragging, It's called slogging through weeds in neoprene waders
> >> looking for downed ducks. But, don't ever get caught in an area where
> >> there was once woods as the tree stumps and roots turn to "quicksand".
> >> I was so ****ing ****ed when my left leg slipped nearly to it's knee
> >> into that **** and I couldn't get it out for about 10 minutes. I
> >> slammed the butt of my shotgun down so hard I'm surprised that it
> >> didn't fire (of course not, it's a Benelli). This is the easy **** I
> >> had to "walk" through:
> >> http://northernlinks.com/yohan/Tim****ing.jpg
> >>
> >> I was so hot and so soaked with sweat, I stripped off all my clothes
> >> except my waders and dunked myself multiple times into the creek after
> >> I got out of that ****. It was good fun though!?
> >>
> >>
> >> Buddy got ****ed! LOL! Guess you guys know each other pretty well -
Good
> >looking animal! Jesus don;t tell me you;ve got quicksand around there -
> >that is scary ****! (Just as well you know what you're doing) Tim
****ing -
> >ha ha - looks like there would be some reptiles in that scrub!? You
wouldn't
> >get this city boy in there! Still it looks like a great time and must be
a
> >good thing to drop out like that - that's the spot that's a two hours
drive
> >away? Thanks for sending
> >
> >
> Actually, this is a totally different area. This is land my buddy Tim
> owns and it's northwest of me. It's only about a 90 minute drive.
> I've duck hunted every opener there for the last 12 years.
>
> It's not quicksand, it's muck. Wherever there was stumps or trees,
> the wood has rotted out and made a very loose "base" that will cause a
> person to sink and it is extremely difficult to free yourself while
> wearing waders.

It sure is a great getaway. Beats doing the lawns and chores around the
house!

John M. Williams
September 29th 04, 08:31 PM
"Larry Hodges" > wrote:
>
>Actually, what I call ballistic stretching is really dynamic stretching.
>It's just back in the '78 when I started martial arts, that's what we called
>it. Never the less, I should know better than to post improper terminology
>here. Elzi was right to call me on it.
>
>Go here for complete "accurate" definitions of stretching types:
>
>http://www.bath.ac.uk/~masrjb/Stretch/stretching_4.html
>
>I never, ever do ballistic stretching as it's defined here.

When I started in the martial arts in '74, there was a lot of
ballistic stretching. By the end of the 70s, that had fallen very
much into disfavor amongst most martial artists, and static stretching
was highly favored. Dynamic stretching seems to vary from ballistic
stretching only by degree. In my experience, the most effective
stretching to improve flexibility is a static stretch held for a long
period of time.

For post-exercise stretching to reduce muscle tension, dynamic
stretching is OK.

Adam Fahy
September 29th 04, 08:45 PM
John M. Williams wrote:

> When I started in the martial arts in '74, there was a lot of
> ballistic stretching. By the end of the 70s, that had fallen very
> much into disfavor amongst most martial artists, and static stretching
> was highly favored. Dynamic stretching seems to vary from ballistic
> stretching only by degree. In my experience, the most effective
> stretching to improve flexibility is a static stretch held for a long
> period of time.

There really are two things at work here. While I was in MA, there were
many high-level people (mostly older) I trained with who had no ROM in
static stretches, but were able to perform high kicks (for example) with
great ease and in perfect form. There's a difference between the
"skill" aspect of ROM--perhaps trained via practice and dynamic
flexibility drills--and the structural aspect--perhaps trained via
long-duration static stretches.


-Adam

Larry Hodges
September 29th 04, 08:53 PM
John M. Williams wrote:
> "Larry Hodges" > wrote:
>>
>> Actually, what I call ballistic stretching is really dynamic
>> stretching. It's just back in the '78 when I started martial arts,
>> that's what we called it. Never the less, I should know better than
>> to post improper terminology here. Elzi was right to call me on it.
>>
>> Go here for complete "accurate" definitions of stretching types:
>>
>> http://www.bath.ac.uk/~masrjb/Stretch/stretching_4.html
>>
>> I never, ever do ballistic stretching as it's defined here.
>
> When I started in the martial arts in '74, there was a lot of
> ballistic stretching. By the end of the 70s, that had fallen very
> much into disfavor amongst most martial artists, and static stretching
> was highly favored. Dynamic stretching seems to vary from ballistic
> stretching only by degree. In my experience, the most effective
> stretching to improve flexibility is a static stretch held for a long
> period of time.
>
> For post-exercise stretching to reduce muscle tension, dynamic
> stretching is OK.

What I was calling balistic stretching (actually dynamic by definition), I
do as part of my warmup. I don't try to even come close to my flexibility
limits, but rather simply get things moving. After my workout is the only
time I static stretch.
--
-Larry

Larry Hodges
September 30th 04, 12:07 AM
elzinator wrote:
> On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 23:41:04 -0500, John Hanson wrote:
>> On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 22:48:43 -0500, John Hanson
>> > wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>>
>>
>>>
>>> Back to a weights note, I have found a better exercise than sled
>>> dragging, It's called slogging through weeds in neoprene waders
>>> looking for downed ducks. But, don't ever get caught in an area
>>> where there was once woods as the tree stumps and roots turn to
>>> "quicksand". I was so ****ing ****ed when my left leg slipped
>>> nearly to it's knee into that **** and I couldn't get it out for
>>> about 10 minutes. I slammed the butt of my shotgun down so hard
>>> I'm surprised that it didn't fire (of course not, it's a Benelli).
>>> This is the easy **** I had to "walk" through:
>>> http://northernlinks.com/yohan/Tim****ing.jpg
>>>
>> One thing I failed to mention is that I did this on both Saturday and
>> Sunday with Sunday the more stressful day. Monday I squatted and I
>> felt so strong I felt I could have squatted 600 in a suit and
>> wraps...or just waders:-)
>
>
> Dude, I dare you to post a picture of you squatting in waders.
> If you do, I'll post a pic of me squatting with my spurs on :)
>
>
>
> Beelzibub

Yeee Haw!!!! Giddiup Hanson!
--
-Larry

elzinator
September 30th 04, 12:07 AM
On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 23:41:04 -0500, John Hanson wrote:
>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 22:48:43 -0500, John Hanson
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>
>
>>
>>Back to a weights note, I have found a better exercise than sled
>>dragging, It's called slogging through weeds in neoprene waders
>>looking for downed ducks. But, don't ever get caught in an area where
>>there was once woods as the tree stumps and roots turn to "quicksand".
>>I was so ****ing ****ed when my left leg slipped nearly to it's knee
>>into that **** and I couldn't get it out for about 10 minutes. I
>>slammed the butt of my shotgun down so hard I'm surprised that it
>>didn't fire (of course not, it's a Benelli). This is the easy **** I
>>had to "walk" through:
>>http://northernlinks.com/yohan/Tim****ing.jpg
>>
>One thing I failed to mention is that I did this on both Saturday and
>Sunday with Sunday the more stressful day. Monday I squatted and I
>felt so strong I felt I could have squatted 600 in a suit and
>wraps...or just waders:-)


Dude, I dare you to post a picture of you squatting in waders.
If you do, I'll post a pic of me squatting with my spurs on :)



Beelzibub

"Modern man must rediscover a deeper source of his own spiritual life. To do this,he is obligated
to struggle with evil, to confront his own shadow, to integrate the devil."
- Carl Jung

elzinator
September 30th 04, 12:24 AM
On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 11:54:47 -0700, Larry Hodges wrote:
>Elzinator wrote:
>> "Larry Hodges" > wrote in message
>> >...
>>> elzinator wrote:
>>>> On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 11:49:27 -0700, Larry Hodges wrote:

>>>>> Some here argue that extreme flexibility is not necessarily a good
>>>>> thing for a weight lifter, their argument being limited flexibility
>>>>> protects the joints. I won't offer an opinion on this other than
>>>>> to say, for me, I like good flexibility. But then again, martial
>>>>> arts is my emphasis, so I don't fit the mold of just weight
>>>>> lifter. So take my advice with a grain of salt.
>>>>
>>>> Or, to be more succinct:
>>>>
>>>> there is static stretching, passive stretching, dynamic stretching
>>>> and 'ballistic' stretching. Each has merits with the appropriate
>>>> goal.
>>>>
>>>> So, basically, your rules for stretching are irrelevant and not
>>>> correct.
>>>>
>>>> How about a suggestion for a substitute:
>>>>
>>>> Stretch what's tight.
>>>> Use warm-up reps/sets as stretching.
>>>>
>>>>
>>> Hey, don't be anal! Like I said, it works for me.
>>
>> I'm obsessive, not anal.
>
>There's a difference?

I must confess: (warning: off topic)

I can't overcome my aversion to using/hearing the term 'anal.'
Considering that I've raised livestock, horses, dogs, kid, blah blah
and now working in medical science, the word 'anal' has one strong
response in my brain: asshole. You know, that orifice, body cavity
from which solid waste is secreted.

Talk about autonomous response or word association, 'anal' to me means
the ass hole.

I prefer the term 'obsessive'. :)

>> And remember, what works for you may not for everyone.
>
>I stand corrected on my terminology, thank you very much.

hehe

>>> Shoulda been here today Elzi. 82, sunny...perfect Portland day.
>>> Definitely one to write home about.
>>
>> I like it at 85, sunny and day.
>> We had a beauty of a full moon laslt night, though.
>> Oh yeah...
>
>I love the sun, hate the rain. Why am I in Oregon? Who the **** knows. If
>my kids weren't here, I'd be gone in a flash.

I love Oregon. Really. For several years I expected to live my life
out and die on my 20-Acres of Paradise in the foothills of the Coastal
Range. But like you, I hated the rain. Having seasonal affective
disorder, I was a depressed zombie all winter. I never realized it
until I moved South. The summers in Oregon, however, no one could make
me stay indoors (even in my position at OSU, I was out in the field
alot). I only went in the house to sleep. Even my gym had windows
along the entire outside wall. I'm a Sun Worshipper. My daughter is
now in Arizona and loves it there. So we are closer now.

>Or maybe I stay because I'd miss my ex? *NOT*

My ex is there, too. Somewhere near you.

My French colleagues and I plan on taking vacation in Oregon maybe
next year. I'm taking them hiking, etc in the Cascades and exploring
the Coast. Should be a fun time. (They are taking me to Australia)

Two planned stops in Portland: the Alexis (Greek restaurant on
Burnside) and Powell's Bookstore.

Beelzibub

"Modern man must rediscover a deeper source of his own spiritual life. To do this,he is obligated
to struggle with evil, to confront his own shadow, to integrate the devil."
- Carl Jung

John Hanson
September 30th 04, 02:29 AM
On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 18:07:59 -0500, elzinator
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 23:41:04 -0500, John Hanson wrote:
>>On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 22:48:43 -0500, John Hanson
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>>
>>
>>>
>>>Back to a weights note, I have found a better exercise than sled
>>>dragging, It's called slogging through weeds in neoprene waders
>>>looking for downed ducks. But, don't ever get caught in an area where
>>>there was once woods as the tree stumps and roots turn to "quicksand".
>>>I was so ****ing ****ed when my left leg slipped nearly to it's knee
>>>into that **** and I couldn't get it out for about 10 minutes. I
>>>slammed the butt of my shotgun down so hard I'm surprised that it
>>>didn't fire (of course not, it's a Benelli). This is the easy **** I
>>>had to "walk" through:
>>>http://northernlinks.com/yohan/Tim****ing.jpg
>>>
>>One thing I failed to mention is that I did this on both Saturday and
>>Sunday with Sunday the more stressful day. Monday I squatted and I
>>felt so strong I felt I could have squatted 600 in a suit and
>>wraps...or just waders:-)
>
>
>Dude, I dare you to post a picture of you squatting in waders.
>If you do, I'll post a pic of me squatting with my spurs on :)
>
>
Hmm, I just might. We'll see what kind of mood I'm in Friday.

Tiger Hillside
September 30th 04, 04:01 AM
On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 09:29:35 -0500, Proton Soup >
wrote:

>On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 14:19:53 GMT, Tiger Hillside
> wrote:
>
>>On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 00:17:49 -0700, "Larry Hodges"
> wrote:
>>
>>[snip]
>>
>>>Shoulda been here today Elzi. 82, sunny...perfect Portland day. Definitely
>>>one to write home about.
>>
>>Yuck. Give me 65 any day, 50 if I am going to be on a bike or on a
>>hike (rhyme not deliberate). I get to wear a jacket and jeans and
>>breath properly.
>
>If you need that much clothing at those temps, then you're going for a
>walk, not a hike.

I have never been particularly good at connecting the temp number to
how it feels, I never really pay much attention. But today was in the
high 60's and a t-shirt was all I need. I guess I was wrong about 65.

John M. Williams
September 30th 04, 04:13 PM
Carl Nisarel > bleated:

>But heard, half-heard in the silliness, John M. Williams
>writes;
>
>> not to mention the frustrating time you must have spent in
>> Google Groups, hunting for a non-existent statement that
>> you claimed I made.
>
>You're delusional, Johnny. I didn't spend any time going
>through Google Groups.

Because you already knew the statement was non-existent but lied about
it, anyway?

John M. Williams
September 30th 04, 05:42 PM
Carl Nisarel > wrote:

>But heard, half-heard in the silliness, John M. Williams
>writes;
>
>> Carl Nisarel > wrote:
>>
>>>But heard, half-heard in the silliness, John M. Williams
>>>writes;
>>>
>>>> not to mention the frustrating time you must have spent
>>>> in
>>>> Google Groups, hunting for a non-existent statement that
>>>> you claimed I made.
>>>
>>>You're delusional, Johnny. I didn't spend any time going
>>>through Google Groups.
>>
>> Because you already knew the statement ...
>
>That's all that was needed. I already knew what you wrote.
>
>We both know that you cited a Lott working paper and tried to
>pass it off as a reviewed article.
>
>You're so embarrassed by your error, you're now trying to
>deny that you cited that working paper.

All my posts are archived in Google. Prove it, Carl.

John M. Williams
October 1st 04, 07:06 PM
Carl Nisarel > wrote:

>But heard, half-heard in the silliness, John M. Williams
>writes;
>
>> Carl Nisarel > wrote:
>>
>>>But heard, half-heard in the silliness, John M. Williams
>>>writes;
>>>
>>>> Carl Nisarel > wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>But heard, half-heard in the silliness, John M. Williams
>>>>>writes;
>>>>>
>>>>>> not to mention the frustrating time you must have
>>>>>> spent in
>>>>>> Google Groups, hunting for a non-existent statement
>>>>>> that you claimed I made.
>>>>>
>>>>>You're delusional, Johnny. I didn't spend any time going
>>>>>through Google Groups.
>>>>
>>>> Because you already knew the statement ...
>>>
>>>That's all that was needed. I already knew what you wrote.
>>>
>>>We both know that you cited a Lott working paper and tried
>>>to pass it off as a reviewed article.
>>>
>>>You're so embarrassed by your error, you're now trying to
>>>deny that you cited that working paper.
>>
>> All my posts are archived in Google.
>
>Yep. The posts are there as well.
>
>That's why you know you can't directly deny that you used a
>working paper by Lott as evidence and tried to pass it off as
>a reviewed article.
>
>Respond with a yes or no, Johnny. Did you use a working paper
>by Lott?

That's not the full compound sentence that you used in your original
assertion. See your previous paragraph.