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Joe Laughlin
September 28th 04, 11:26 PM
So, I've read that if you do some cardio in the morning on an empty stomach,
the exercise will get most of its fuel from fat, since there's not much
glucose in the system.

Is there any difference to doing cardio in the morning before breakfast
(from a fat loss standpoint) than any other time of day (or if there's food
in the stomach)?

Thanks,
Joe

Lyle McDonald
September 29th 04, 12:49 AM
Joe Laughlin wrote:

> So, I've read that if you do some cardio in the morning on an empty stomach,
> the exercise will get most of its fuel from fat, since there's not much
> glucose in the system.
>
> Is there any difference to doing cardio in the morning before breakfast
> (from a fat loss standpoint) than any other time of day (or if there's food
> in the stomach)?

Not that anyone has ever demonstrated.

It *might* make a difference for the extremely lean.

Lyle

jr
September 29th 04, 09:07 AM
Lyle McDonald > wrote in message >...
> Joe Laughlin wrote:
>
> > So, I've read that if you do some cardio in the morning on an empty stomach,
> > the exercise will get most of its fuel from fat, since there's not much
> > glucose in the system.
> >
> > Is there any difference to doing cardio in the morning before breakfast
> > (from a fat loss standpoint) than any other time of day (or if there's food
> > in the stomach)?
>
> Not that anyone has ever demonstrated.
>
> It *might* make a difference for the extremely lean.
>
> Lyle


hi Lyle

E
September 29th 04, 12:18 PM
And for stubborn fat no?

"Lyle McDonald" > wrote in message
...
> Joe Laughlin wrote:
>
> > So, I've read that if you do some cardio in the morning on an empty
stomach,
> > the exercise will get most of its fuel from fat, since there's not much
> > glucose in the system.
> >
> > Is there any difference to doing cardio in the morning before breakfast
> > (from a fat loss standpoint) than any other time of day (or if there's
food
> > in the stomach)?
>
> Not that anyone has ever demonstrated.
>
> It *might* make a difference for the extremely lean.
>
> Lyle
>

DRS
September 29th 04, 01:55 PM
"Joe Laughlin" > wrote in message

> So, I've read that if you do some cardio in the morning on an empty
> stomach, the exercise will get most of its fuel from fat, since
> there's not much glucose in the system.
>
> Is there any difference to doing cardio in the morning before
> breakfast (from a fat loss standpoint) than any other time of day (or
> if there's food in the stomach)?

Your body needs some fuel so it can metabolize fat. If there are no carbs
in your system where is that fuel going to come from?

--

"Self-delusion as a coping tool has always been a fairly useful strategy for
me."
Dally

Joe Laughlin
September 29th 04, 08:45 PM
DRS wrote:
> "Joe Laughlin" > wrote in
> message
>> So, I've read that if you do some cardio in the morning
>> on an empty stomach, the exercise will get most of its
>> fuel from fat, since there's not much glucose in the
>> system.
>>
>> Is there any difference to doing cardio in the morning
>> before breakfast (from a fat loss standpoint) than any
>> other time of day (or if there's food in the stomach)?
>
> Your body needs some fuel so it can metabolize fat. If
> there are no carbs in your system where is that fuel
> going to come from?

You mean glucose? I'd imagine that there'd be enough glucose in a typical
body before eating breakfast to metabolize fat.

Joe Laughlin
September 29th 04, 08:46 PM
Lyle McDonald wrote:
> Joe Laughlin wrote:
>
>> So, I've read that if you do some cardio in the morning
>> on an empty stomach, the exercise will get most of its
>> fuel from fat, since there's not much glucose in the
>> system.
>>
>> Is there any difference to doing cardio in the morning
>> before breakfast (from a fat loss standpoint) than any
>> other time of day (or if there's food in the stomach)?
>
> Not that anyone has ever demonstrated.
>
> It *might* make a difference for the extremely lean.
>
> Lyle

Why *might*? And when you say "extremely lean", you mean less than 10%?

Lyle McDonald
September 29th 04, 11:30 PM
E wrote:
> And for stubborn fat no?

Yes, but stubborn fat usually only becomse an issue when you're really lean.

Lyle

>
> "Lyle McDonald" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>>Joe Laughlin wrote:
>>
>>
>>>So, I've read that if you do some cardio in the morning on an empty
>
> stomach,
>
>>>the exercise will get most of its fuel from fat, since there's not much
>>>glucose in the system.
>>>
>>>Is there any difference to doing cardio in the morning before breakfast
>>>(from a fat loss standpoint) than any other time of day (or if there's
>
> food
>
>>>in the stomach)?
>>
>>Not that anyone has ever demonstrated.
>>
>>It *might* make a difference for the extremely lean.
>>
>>Lyle
>>
>
>
>

Lyle McDonald
September 29th 04, 11:31 PM
DRS wrote:

> "Joe Laughlin" > wrote in message
>
>
>>So, I've read that if you do some cardio in the morning on an empty
>>stomach, the exercise will get most of its fuel from fat, since
>>there's not much glucose in the system.
>>
>>Is there any difference to doing cardio in the morning before
>>breakfast (from a fat loss standpoint) than any other time of day (or
>>if there's food in the stomach)?
>
>
> Your body needs some fuel so it can metabolize fat. If there are no carbs
> in your system where is that fuel going to come from?
>

Reread the question. Note what's in the first parentheses: that's the
key issue being asked about here.

Lyle

Lyle McDonald
September 29th 04, 11:33 PM
Joe Laughlin wrote:

> Lyle McDonald wrote:
>
>>Joe Laughlin wrote:
>>
>>
>>>So, I've read that if you do some cardio in the morning
>>>on an empty stomach, the exercise will get most of its
>>>fuel from fat, since there's not much glucose in the
>>>system.
>>>
>>>Is there any difference to doing cardio in the morning
>>>before breakfast (from a fat loss standpoint) than any
>>>other time of day (or if there's food in the stomach)?
>>
>>Not that anyone has ever demonstrated.
>>
>>It *might* make a difference for the extremely lean.
>>
>>Lyle
>
>
> Why *might*? And when you say "extremely lean", you mean less than 10%?
>

What do you mean 'why might'?
things tend to get goofy at hte extremes of either very fat or very
lean. In the first case you tend to see overmobilization of fatty acids
but poor oxidation, in the second you have trouble mobilizing them. I
can conceptualize a situation where, in the very lean, issues with fat
mobilization might make pre-breakfast cardio relatively more useful.

Basically, I'm playing a quick game of CYA (cover your ass).

And yes, 10-12% for males would be when the problems tend to really start.

Lyle