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Mark
September 29th 04, 05:23 PM
After approximately half an hour of either aerobic(mountain bike riding in a
fresh air) or anaerobic(weight lifting in a gym) workout I feel exhausted,
dizzy and sick. If I pursue the training, especially when weight lifting, it
darkens in front of my eyes and I see sparks and stars. My face turns pale
and fatigue, black 'bags' appear under my eyes, altogether I start to look
like that sharp-toothed Transylvanian fellow :).

I have tested my blood pressure which is normal(130/70) and the iron in
blood is on a satisfying level(14 i think) although it could be better.
What concerns me most is hyperglicemia, an excess of sugar in blood. The
sugar was slightly increased last time I tested it. My diet is not exactly
well-balanced. I eat too much sweets, chocolate and low-quality
carbohydrates, especially in the morning. But even when I have tried a
high-protein diet with less carbohydrates and no sweets for a period of a
few days, I've experienced the same symptoms. Maybe I should have tried
no-sugar diet for a longer period than several days?

Is the sugar problem? What else could it be? What kind of a diet should I
try?
Any experiences are welcome, thank you.

Tiger Hillside
September 29th 04, 05:57 PM
On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 18:23:52 +0200, "Mark" > wrote:

>After approximately half an hour of either aerobic(mountain bike riding in a
>fresh air) or anaerobic(weight lifting in a gym) workout I feel exhausted,
>dizzy and sick. If I pursue the training, especially when weight lifting, it
>darkens in front of my eyes and I see sparks and stars. My face turns pale
>and fatigue, black 'bags' appear under my eyes, altogether I start to look
>like that sharp-toothed Transylvanian fellow :).
>
>I have tested my blood pressure which is normal(130/70) and the iron in
>blood is on a satisfying level(14 i think) although it could be better.
>What concerns me most is hyperglicemia, an excess of sugar in blood. The
>sugar was slightly increased last time I tested it. My diet is not exactly
>well-balanced. I eat too much sweets, chocolate and low-quality
>carbohydrates, especially in the morning. But even when I have tried a
>high-protein diet with less carbohydrates and no sweets for a period of a
>few days, I've experienced the same symptoms. Maybe I should have tried
>no-sugar diet for a longer period than several days?
>
>Is the sugar problem? What else could it be? What kind of a diet should I
>try?
>Any experiences are welcome, thank you.
>
Just to be sure, you are drinking enough water, aren't you?

JayB
September 29th 04, 05:59 PM
"Mark" > wrote in message ...
> After approximately half an hour of either aerobic(mountain bike riding in
a
> fresh air) or anaerobic(weight lifting in a gym) workout I feel exhausted,
> dizzy and sick. If I pursue the training, especially when weight lifting,
it
> darkens in front of my eyes and I see sparks and stars. My face turns pale
> and fatigue, black 'bags' appear under my eyes, altogether I start to look
> like that sharp-toothed Transylvanian fellow :).
>
> I have tested my blood pressure which is normal(130/70) and the iron in
> blood is on a satisfying level(14 i think) although it could be better.
> What concerns me most is hyperglicemia, an excess of sugar in blood. The
> sugar was slightly increased last time I tested it. My diet is not exactly
> well-balanced. I eat too much sweets, chocolate and low-quality
> carbohydrates, especially in the morning. But even when I have tried a
> high-protein diet with less carbohydrates and no sweets for a period of a
> few days, I've experienced the same symptoms. Maybe I should have tried
> no-sugar diet for a longer period than several days?
>
> Is the sugar problem? What else could it be? What kind of a diet should I
> try?
> Any experiences are welcome, thank you.

You sound dehydrated.

--
JayB

TheTortoise
September 29th 04, 06:02 PM
Mark wrote:
> After approximately half an hour of either aerobic(mountain bike
riding in a
> fresh air) or anaerobic(weight lifting in a gym) workout I feel
exhausted,
> dizzy and sick. If I pursue the training, especially when weight
lifting, it
> darkens in front of my eyes and I see sparks and stars. My face turns
pale
> and fatigue, black 'bags' appear under my eyes, altogether I start to
look
> like that sharp-toothed Transylvanian fellow :).
>
<snip>

Good lord, man, don't ask for medical advice on Usenet. Go see a
doctor!

Matthew
September 29th 04, 09:21 PM
"Mark" > wrote in message ...
> After approximately half an hour of either aerobic(mountain bike riding in
a
> fresh air) or anaerobic(weight lifting in a gym) workout I feel exhausted,
> dizzy and sick. If I pursue the training, especially when weight lifting,
it
> darkens in front of my eyes and I see sparks and stars. My face turns pale
> and fatigue, black 'bags' appear under my eyes, altogether I start to look
> like that sharp-toothed Transylvanian fellow :).
>
> I have tested my blood pressure which is normal(130/70) and the iron in
> blood is on a satisfying level(14 i think) although it could be better.
> What concerns me most is hyperglicemia, an excess of sugar in blood. The
> sugar was slightly increased last time I tested it. My diet is not exactly
> well-balanced. I eat too much sweets, chocolate and low-quality
> carbohydrates, especially in the morning. But even when I have tried a
> high-protein diet with less carbohydrates and no sweets for a period of a
> few days, I've experienced the same symptoms. Maybe I should have tried
> no-sugar diet for a longer period than several days?
>
> Is the sugar problem? What else could it be? What kind of a diet should I
> try?
> Any experiences are welcome, thank you.

What do you eat prior to your workout? How long before your workout do you
eat? You could be hypoglycemic if you've gone too long without food.

Matthew

Mark
September 29th 04, 10:09 PM
"Matthew" > wrote in message
...

> What do you eat prior to your workout? How long before your workout do
you
> eat? You could be hypoglycemic if you've gone too long without food.
>
> Matthew
>
>

I would have never thought of that considering all the sweet garbage I eat
through the day.
I eat a bowl of cornflakes w. milk or some snakes or similar, an hour or two
prior to workout, sometimes immediately before going to gym.
But that's when I feel hungry, sometimes I don't eat for about three maybe
more hours before workout if I forget or don't feel hunger.

I'll try experimenting with different carbos of better quality before
workout and more water and I hope I'll find out what suits me.
Thanks

Justin Morton
September 29th 04, 10:12 PM
Mark wrote:
> After approximately half an hour of either aerobic(mountain bike riding in a
> fresh air) or anaerobic(weight lifting in a gym) workout I feel exhausted,
> dizzy and sick. If I pursue the training, especially when weight lifting, it
> darkens in front of my eyes and I see sparks and stars. My face turns pale
> and fatigue, black 'bags' appear under my eyes, altogether I start to look
> like that sharp-toothed Transylvanian fellow :).
>
> I have tested my blood pressure which is normal(130/70) and the iron in
> blood is on a satisfying level(14 i think) although it could be better.
> What concerns me most is hyperglicemia, an excess of sugar in blood. The
> sugar was slightly increased last time I tested it. My diet is not exactly
> well-balanced. I eat too much sweets, chocolate and low-quality
> carbohydrates, especially in the morning. But even when I have tried a
> high-protein diet with less carbohydrates and no sweets for a period of a
> few days, I've experienced the same symptoms. Maybe I should have tried
> no-sugar diet for a longer period than several days?
>
> Is the sugar problem? What else could it be? What kind of a diet should I
> try?
> Any experiences are welcome, thank you.
>
>

Take warning and listen carefully:
SEE YOUR DOCTOR AND GET A FULL PHYSICAL AND BLOOD WORKUP.
SHARE YOUR CONCERNS WITH YOUR MD.
IMMEDIATELY!
Justin

--
"He who makes a beast of himself gets rid of the pain of being a man."
- Hunter S. Thompson

Wayne S. Hill
September 30th 04, 12:56 AM
Mark wrote:

> After approximately half an hour of either aerobic(mountain
> bike riding in a fresh air) or anaerobic(weight lifting in a
> gym) workout I feel exhausted, dizzy and sick. If I pursue
> the training, especially when weight lifting, it darkens in
> front of my eyes and I see sparks and stars. My face turns
> pale and fatigue, black 'bags' appear under my eyes,
> altogether I start to look like that sharp-toothed
> Transylvanian fellow :).
>
> I have tested my blood pressure which is normal(130/70) and
> the iron in blood is on a satisfying level(14 i think)
> although it could be better. What concerns me most is
> hyperglicemia, an excess of sugar in blood. The sugar was
> slightly increased last time I tested it. My diet is not
> exactly well-balanced. I eat too much sweets, chocolate and
> low-quality carbohydrates, especially in the morning. But
> even when I have tried a high-protein diet with less
> carbohydrates and no sweets for a period of a few days, I've
> experienced the same symptoms. Maybe I should have tried
> no-sugar diet for a longer period than several days?
>
> Is the sugar problem? What else could it be? What kind of a
> diet should I try?
> Any experiences are welcome, thank you.

The most probable answer: your heart rate is running away. Try
monitoring your heart rate between sets in weight training, and
see if it spikes as you start to feel lousy.

--
-Wayne

Matthew
September 30th 04, 04:30 AM
"Mark" > wrote in message ...
>
> "Matthew" > wrote in message
> ...
>
> > What do you eat prior to your workout? How long before your workout do
> you
> > eat? You could be hypoglycemic if you've gone too long without food.
> >
> > Matthew
> >
> >
>
> I would have never thought of that considering all the sweet garbage I eat
> through the day.
> I eat a bowl of cornflakes w. milk or some snakes or similar, an hour or
two
> prior to workout, sometimes immediately before going to gym.
> But that's when I feel hungry, sometimes I don't eat for about three maybe
> more hours before workout if I forget or don't feel hunger.
>
> I'll try experimenting with different carbos of better quality before
> workout and more water and I hope I'll find out what suits me.
> Thanks

Going too long without food before a workout kills me. I tend to eat a full
meal about an hour prior to working out. I drink a shake immediately after
working out. That means I'll usually be without food for two to three
hours. I also drink plenty of water during my work-outs.

Matthew

September 30th 04, 04:44 PM
I would say make sure you are drinking a lot of water. Not only during
the workout but also during the day. Dehydration build up in your
system you have to stay hydrated all the time.

Courtney

billydee
September 30th 04, 05:22 PM
"Mark" > wrote in message >...
> After approximately half an hour of either aerobic(mountain bike riding in a
> fresh air) or anaerobic(weight lifting in a gym) workout I feel exhausted,
> dizzy and sick. If I pursue the training, especially when weight lifting, it
> darkens in front of my eyes and I see sparks and stars. My face turns pale
> and fatigue, black 'bags' appear under my eyes, altogether I start to look
> like that sharp-toothed Transylvanian fellow :).
>
> I have tested my blood pressure which is normal(130/70) and the iron in
> blood is on a satisfying level(14 i think) although it could be better.
> What concerns me most is hyperglicemia, an excess of sugar in blood. The
> sugar was slightly increased last time I tested it. My diet is not exactly
> well-balanced. I eat too much sweets, chocolate and low-quality
> carbohydrates, especially in the morning. But even when I have tried a
> high-protein diet with less carbohydrates and no sweets for a period of a
> few days, I've experienced the same symptoms. Maybe I should have tried
> no-sugar diet for a longer period than several days?
>
> Is the sugar problem? What else could it be? What kind of a diet should I
> try?
> Any experiences are welcome, thank you.


I'd see a doctor, but it could be a sugar problem like hypoglycemia.
When I eat too much simple sugars I can sometimes get the dizzy
feeling you describe during hard efforts.

NC
September 30th 04, 07:02 PM
Mark wrote:
> After approximately half an hour of either aerobic(mountain bike riding in a
> fresh air) or anaerobic(weight lifting in a gym) workout I feel exhausted,
> dizzy and sick. If I pursue the training, especially when weight lifting, it
> darkens in front of my eyes and I see sparks and stars. My face turns pale
> and fatigue, black 'bags' appear under my eyes, altogether I start to look
> like that sharp-toothed Transylvanian fellow :).
>
> I have tested my blood pressure which is normal(130/70) and the iron in
> blood is on a satisfying level(14 i think) although it could be better.
> What concerns me most is hyperglicemia, an excess of sugar in blood. The
> sugar was slightly increased last time I tested it. My diet is not exactly
> well-balanced. I eat too much sweets, chocolate and low-quality
> carbohydrates, especially in the morning. But even when I have tried a
> high-protein diet with less carbohydrates and no sweets for a period of a
> few days, I've experienced the same symptoms. Maybe I should have tried
> no-sugar diet for a longer period than several days?
>
> Is the sugar problem? What else could it be? What kind of a diet should I
> try?
> Any experiences are welcome, thank you.
>
>

Have a banana 30mins before you hit the gym.

Tony Miller
September 30th 04, 08:10 PM
On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 23:09:25 +0200, Mark
> wrote:

> I eat a bowl of cornflakes w. milk or some snakes or similar, an hour or two

Snakes?!?!? What kind of snakes, and how do you cook them?

-Tony

:)

--
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cl00bie @ IRC - /server cookie.sorcery.net 9000, http://www.sorcery.net
We welcome WebTV'ers - http://www.sorcery.net/help/index.html#WebTV

MJL
October 1st 04, 03:45 AM
On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 18:23:52 +0200, "Mark" > wrote:

>After approximately half an hour of either aerobic(mountain bike riding in a
>fresh air) or anaerobic(weight lifting in a gym) workout I feel exhausted,
>dizzy and sick. If I pursue the training, especially when weight lifting, it
>darkens in front of my eyes and I see sparks and stars. My face turns pale
>and fatigue, black 'bags' appear under my eyes, altogether I start to look
>like that sharp-toothed Transylvanian fellow :).
>
>I have tested my blood pressure which is normal(130/70) and the iron in
>blood is on a satisfying level(14 i think) although it could be better.
>What concerns me most is hyperglicemia, an excess of sugar in blood. The
>sugar was slightly increased last time I tested it. My diet is not exactly
>well-balanced. I eat too much sweets, chocolate and low-quality
>carbohydrates, especially in the morning. But even when I have tried a
>high-protein diet with less carbohydrates and no sweets for a period of a
>few days, I've experienced the same symptoms. Maybe I should have tried
>no-sugar diet for a longer period than several days?
>
>Is the sugar problem? What else could it be? What kind of a diet should I
>try?
>Any experiences are welcome, thank you.
>

It could be any number of innocuous things. However, you really
should have a thorough workup with your GP who may send you to a
cardiologist.


--
http://www.texansfortruth.org/

Mark
October 1st 04, 10:09 AM
> > I eat a bowl of cornflakes w. milk or some snakes or similar, an hour or
two
>
> Snakes?!?!? What kind of snakes, and how do you cook them?
>
> -Tony
>
> :)

Sorry, I meant snacks.
BTW some snakes are nice barbecued.

dwacon
October 2nd 04, 10:56 PM
"Mark" > wrote in message ...
> > > I eat a bowl of cornflakes w. milk or some snakes or similar, an hour
or
> two
> >
> > Snakes?!?!? What kind of snakes, and how do you cook them?


One item in particular is included in this concept are snakes. No wings, no
legs but most can swim, and that makes them fair game, or should that be
"fare game" for the Cantonese table. Since the time of the Han Dynasty
(206BC-220AD), snake dishes have had a place in Chinese culinary culture.
The Cantonese, in particular, have made snake dishes their Speciality, using
a variety of snakes, sometimes more than one type, to obtain a particular
flavor in a dish.
Snakes are served beginning from around the end of September or well into
October, depending upon the "sleeping" times of the snake, and right on
until around the Lunar New Year. As the cooler temperatures of autumn set
in, diners seek out the most accomplished chefs in the restaurants dedicated
to snake cuisine.

Most believe that snake meat has medicinal properties, including curing
rheumatism, preventing excessive sweating during the night, increasing blood
circulation, keeping the body warm, and perhaps the main claim to fame, that
it is an aphrodisiac.

In Hong Kong, this speciality can be found in small neighborhood eateries,
such as those belonging to Snake King Yuen in Yau Ma Tei. Establishments
like these are mostly on the Kowloon side of the harbour. Only Cantonese is
spoken and menus are a rarity, so a local friend is needed to steer the
would-be diner towards the most suitable dishes.

Best known for its skills in preparing much-prized abalone, the Abalone King
Restaurant in Percival Street, Causeway Bay, also participates in the
relatively short snake season. But, given Hong Kong's preoccupation with
food, it's not surprising that there are also some internationally acclaimed
establishments that pride themselves on their snake dish menus. But locally
based, international food critic and author, Eric W M Wong, swears the best
snake dishes are made in the private kitchen of the Hang Seng Bank and in
the dining room of the Gold and Silver Exchange Centre!

YOUNG KEE'S SNAKE SPECIALTIES
Frequent visitors to Hong Kong will need no introduction to the Yung Kee
Restaurant at 32 - 40 Wellington Street in Central. It is considered to be
one of the finest in Asia. From 1968, when Yung Kee was chosen by Fortune
magazine as the only Chinese restaurant to merit inclusion in their list of
"The Fifteen Best Restaurants in the World", Yung Kee has gained around 50
international accolades and many prizes, including a number of Gold and
Platinum Culinary Awards. Director and General Manager of Yung Kee, Mr
Kinsen Kan, says: "Our all-year-round house speciality is roast goose. In
the autumn/winter period we offer a variety of traditional snake dishes,
some of which are exclusive to us, having developed my own methods of
preparing and cooking them over the past 20 years.

"We start the snake dish season earlier than most, in mid-September. Our
chefs prepare several snake dishes, including braised five-kinds-of-snake
meat soup and deep-fried snake meat balls served with mushrooms in a clay
pot." At Yung Kee, the skins of some snakes are deep fried and served with
a secret recipe spicy sauce, but only the meat itself is used to make the
famous soup. "Every morning my parents, our executive chef and I sample the
food being prepared for that day. By tasting the dishes ourselves, we can
control the quality. It is a family tradition to involve the children
whenever this is possible. I myself started sampling snake dishes when I was
five years old. The soup is also good for children," he added.

Regular customers at Yung Kee and other fine restaurants are likely to order
remarkably elaborate snake banquets for the whole family during the peak
season. These are exotic feasts with the soup as the highlight of the meal
accompanied by deep fried snake meat balls, snake sausage and very fine
julienne of snake with thin strips of abalone. Some recipes call for the
addition of dark wood-ear fungus or fish maw to enrich and give texture to
the dishes. And snake is often paired with shredded chicken. Lesser
restaurants use more chicken than snake to cut costs.

To add splendour to celebrations, snake soup is listed on banqueting menus
as "the Dragon, the Tiger and the Phoenix".
The "dragon" is represented usually by one or even three kinds of poisonous
snake: the cobra (naja naja) the Indo-Chinese rat snake (Ptyas korros) and
the banded krait (Bungarus fasciatus). Previously the ingredient
representing the "tiger" was civet cat, which is illegal in Hong Kong. Lamb
can be served instead, and the "phoenix" is actually chicken.

The 2,000-year-old recipe for snake soup advocates a stock of chicken, ham,
sugar cane, ginger, dried longans, brown or red dates and mature mandarin
peel. Peel that is 30-years-old is not uncommon. As an edible garnish, thin
strands of shredded lemon leaves, chrysanthemum petals and flakes of a
crouton-like pastry made from egg and flour are then added.


--
The Kama Sutra Collection
http://tinyurl.com/62hnc

Paulo
October 3rd 04, 05:29 PM
Instead of water, during your workout drink a gatored or equivalent

--
Paulo
"NC" > wrote in message
...
> Mark wrote:
> > After approximately half an hour of either aerobic(mountain bike riding
in a
> > fresh air) or anaerobic(weight lifting in a gym) workout I feel
exhausted,
> > dizzy and sick. If I pursue the training, especially when weight
lifting, it
> > darkens in front of my eyes and I see sparks and stars. My face turns
pale
> > and fatigue, black 'bags' appear under my eyes, altogether I start to
look
> > like that sharp-toothed Transylvanian fellow :).
> >
> > I have tested my blood pressure which is normal(130/70) and the iron in
> > blood is on a satisfying level(14 i think) although it could be better.
> > What concerns me most is hyperglicemia, an excess of sugar in blood. The
> > sugar was slightly increased last time I tested it. My diet is not
exactly
> > well-balanced. I eat too much sweets, chocolate and low-quality
> > carbohydrates, especially in the morning. But even when I have tried a
> > high-protein diet with less carbohydrates and no sweets for a period of
a
> > few days, I've experienced the same symptoms. Maybe I should have tried
> > no-sugar diet for a longer period than several days?
> >
> > Is the sugar problem? What else could it be? What kind of a diet should
I
> > try?
> > Any experiences are welcome, thank you.
> >
> >
>
> Have a banana 30mins before you hit the gym.

Tony Miller
October 4th 04, 06:10 PM
On Sat, 2 Oct 2004 17:56:59 -0400, dwacon
> wrote:
>
> "Mark" > wrote in message ...
>> > > I eat a bowl of cornflakes w. milk or some snakes or similar, an hour
> or
>> two
>> >
>> > Snakes?!?!? What kind of snakes, and how do you cook them?
>
>
> One item in particular is included in this concept are snakes. No wings, no
> legs but most can swim, and that makes them fair game, or should that be
> "fare game" for the Cantonese table. Since the time of the Han Dynasty
> (206BC-220AD), snake dishes have had a place in Chinese culinary culture.

<Snip>

Thanks for the enlightening snake missive. If I'm ever in a restaurant
that serves it, I would definitely try it. I love trying new foods, and
I've sampled squid, frog's legs, snails, brains, stomach lining (tripe),
and other assorted ethnic dishes.

I'm not going to hunt them down kill them and try and cook then, though
:))

-Tony

--
Reliable, Unix shell accounts. http://www.jtan.com/proshell/
cl00bie @ IRC - /server cookie.sorcery.net 9000, http://www.sorcery.net
We welcome WebTV'ers - http://www.sorcery.net/help/index.html#WebTV

Anna Martelli Ravenscroft
October 4th 04, 09:33 PM
Tony Miller wrote:

>
> Thanks for the enlightening snake missive. If I'm ever in a restaurant
> that serves it, I would definitely try it. I love trying new foods, and
> I've sampled squid, frog's legs, snails, brains, stomach lining (tripe),
> and other assorted ethnic dishes.

A friend of ours brought over some lizard one day. He cooked it up along
with some chicken. The kids and I loved it. Afterward, there was no
lizard left, but the chicken was untouched. (These are the same kids
who, when I went deer hunting would tell me to "bring home Bambi!")

Lizard - yum. Never tried snake, but it sounds yummy too.

Anna

Mandy
October 27th 04, 07:47 PM
Mark~
I think you and Dawn (RE: dizziness and blackouts after intense
cardio workouts) are experiencing similar symptoms. I can relate to
both of you. As I responded to her post, I have experienced the same
types of symptoms and after seeing my doctor about the situation,
there's a possibility that I may have HYPOglycemia. Now, I'm no
doctor, but with the way you describe your diet, it sounds like you
have way too many simple sugars in your diet. I know they're the
"fun" foods to eat, but they also seem to be causing problems to your
health. My rule is that I allow myself a piece of chocolate a day
(one hershey kiss for example) and that's the extent of my "fun" food.
I know that may sound crazy to some people, but if you're going to be
serious enough about your health to make it to the gym and work out,
you need to consider the other end of the spectrum of health and
fitness as well: your diet. You may be able to incorporate more
sweets than just a small hershey kiss, but I would definitely take
Justin's advice and seek medical help immediately. Messing with your
blood sugar levels is no joke and can be a very dangerous problem if
untreated.

Mandy
> > Mark wrote:
> > > After approximately half an hour of either aerobic(mountain bike riding
> in a
> > > fresh air) or anaerobic(weight lifting in a gym) workout I feel
> exhausted,
> > > dizzy and sick. If I pursue the training, especially when weight
> lifting, it
> > > darkens in front of my eyes and I see sparks and stars. My face turns
> pale
> > > and fatigue, black 'bags' appear under my eyes, altogether I start to
> look
> > > like that sharp-toothed Transylvanian fellow :).
> > >
> > > I have tested my blood pressure which is normal(130/70) and the iron in
> > > blood is on a satisfying level(14 i think) although it could be better.
> > > What concerns me most is hyperglicemia, an excess of sugar in blood. The
> > > sugar was slightly increased last time I tested it. My diet is not
> exactly
> > > well-balanced. I eat too much sweets, chocolate and low-quality
> > > carbohydrates, especially in the morning. But even when I have tried a
> > > high-protein diet with less carbohydrates and no sweets for a period of
> a
> > > few days, I've experienced the same symptoms. Maybe I should have tried
> > > no-sugar diet for a longer period than several days?
> > >
> > > Is the sugar problem? What else could it be? What kind of a diet should
> I
> > > try?
> > > Any experiences are welcome, thank you.
> > >
> > >
> >
> > Have a banana 30mins before you hit the gym.