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gary_m
October 3rd 04, 02:32 AM
Are there any exercises that help a weak shoulder?
I've had rotator cuff tendonitis in the past & since I've started bench
pressing its coming back.
If I lay off the bench press the pain goes away but I'd rather not.
Any ideas

Kevin J. Coolidge
October 3rd 04, 03:21 AM
I like to what's called a bench shrug for strengthing the shoulder girdle.
It's also great for boosting bench. It's used by benchers for that, but it
makes a nice rehab excercise. You have the bar just like you are going to
bench. The just press the bar up in the shrug from the top of the movement.

"gary_m " <"gary_m > wrote in message
...
> Are there any exercises that help a weak shoulder?
> I've had rotator cuff tendonitis in the past & since I've started bench
> pressing its coming back.
> If I lay off the bench press the pain goes away but I'd rather not.
> Any ideas
>

John M. Williams
October 3rd 04, 05:31 AM
"gary_m " <"gary_m > wrote:

>Are there any exercises that help a weak shoulder?
>I've had rotator cuff tendonitis in the past & since I've started bench
>pressing its coming back.
>If I lay off the bench press the pain goes away but I'd rather not.
>Any ideas

You may want to alter your type of chest/tricep exercise. If you're
not competing, then you aren't required to do a flat barbell bench
press. Try dumbbell bench presses with the dumbbell handles parallel
to your body, thus avoiding internal rotation of the shoulder joint.
If your rotator cuff is extremely tender, think about a switch to pec
deck for the chest and skullcrushers or tricep pressdowns for triceps.
Glucosamine and chondroitin can help the healing; so can ice and heat
when it's tender.

For me, daily use of G&C and working around the damaged shoulder
allowed me to heal and to eventually engage in competition.

spodosaurus
October 3rd 04, 12:50 PM
John M. Williams wrote:
> "gary_m " <"gary_m > wrote:
>
>
>>Are there any exercises that help a weak shoulder?
>>I've had rotator cuff tendonitis in the past & since I've started bench
>>pressing its coming back.
>>If I lay off the bench press the pain goes away but I'd rather not.
>>Any ideas
>
>
> You may want to alter your type of chest/tricep exercise.

I wonder if the OP has been focussing more on pressing (and in
particular bench pressing) and on pulling movements and has developed a
strength imbalance across his shoulders? Correcting this helped with my
shoulder problems.

> If you're
> not competing, then you aren't required to do a flat barbell bench
> press. Try dumbbell bench presses with the dumbbell handles parallel
> to your body, thus avoiding internal rotation of the shoulder joint.

I think Keith is one who recommends incline bench rather than flat
bench. Like you said John, if you're not competing, there's no rule
saying you have to flat bench press to train with weights. A slight
incline dumbbell bench press helped me when I had shoulder problems. I
stuck with it for a while before being able to flat bench again.

>
> If your rotator cuff is extremely tender, think about a switch to pec
> deck for the chest

I've never tried a pec deck machine that didn't pop my shoulders (and
we're talking about gyms on three continents here). That's not going to
make his rotator cuff feel any better.

I like doing internal and external rotation on a cable machine. The gym
I usually go to has one that you can adjust the starting height of the
cable, so I put the pulley height to where my elbow is when standing
next to the weight stack and use a weight that I can handle without
strain for 2-3 sets of external and internal rotation after my upper
body work. External rotation with a dumbbell (lying on my side, aka
lying l-flye) helped with ym shoulder problems in the past, so I've kept
it in my routine.


> and skullcrushers or tricep pressdowns for triceps.
> Glucosamine and chondroitin can help the healing; so can ice and heat
> when it's tender.
>

People have made references to glucosamine as an antiinflamatary type
thing, and I'm wondering if this is just a perpetuated myth? AFAIK,
glucosamine is a building block of cartillage, not an antiinflamatory
compound, and not something that's going to help with tendonitis and
such. I'd appreciate it if someone could point me to a reference about
glucosamine being helpful for tendonitis and other inflamatory muscular
problems. It's helped me maintain cartilage in my mangled ankle for years.

> For me, daily use of G&C and working around the damaged shoulder
> allowed me to heal and to eventually engage in competition.


--
spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

Proton Soup
October 3rd 04, 05:27 PM
On Sat, 02 Oct 2004 21:32:41 -0400, "gary_m " <"gary_m >
wrote:

>Are there any exercises that help a weak shoulder?
>I've had rotator cuff tendonitis in the past & since I've started bench
>pressing its coming back.
>If I lay off the bench press the pain goes away but I'd rather not.
>Any ideas

One thing you might want to experiment with is your grip width. Lay
off until the pain goes away, then go back to benching at the
narrowest grip. When the shoulder acts up, stop for a while. Next
time increase grip width by two inches and try again. And so on...

My left shoulder acts up from time to time, and I've been doing this,
but without the breaks. A slightly wider grip seems to be better for
mine. Also I've been do more sets at 10 or 15 reps instead of just
the low-rep heavy stuff.

Another thing I found recently is that the knurling on my POS bar is
off by 3/8" on the left side, so I've had to make an adjustment to the
magic marker rings I drew on it. I figure my shoulder will always be
a bit off, though. Even though it doesn't hurt, it'll snap, crackle
and pop all the time.

Oh, and google here. Wayne Hill has described some stretching
exercises, etc.

-----------
Proton Soup

"Homo sapiens non urinat in ventum."

Johnny
October 3rd 04, 08:14 PM
If you have that predisposition...STOP! If you tear that cuff you are
SOL!
Try different exercises NOW! Don't "hope that it goes away" or some
wishful stuff like that. There are a whole list of things you can do
to stimulate pec/delt/tri without hurting yourself.
Don't let anything put you up for surgery! Once you blow it it's too
late to say you're sorry.
We all have differing strengths, methods of locomotion and physiology.
There is nothing wrong with altering an approach.

Start reading a journal entitled Kinesiology Today (local university
library should have it) - it will put you in the right direction with
no commercial bullsh*t. All the stuff there is peer-reviewed medical
fact: not slick-page fitness magazine pap.


On Sat, 02 Oct 2004 21:32:41 -0400, "gary_m " <"gary_m >
wrote:

>Are there any exercises that help a weak shoulder?
>I've had rotator cuff tendonitis in the past & since I've started bench
>pressing its coming back.
>If I lay off the bench press the pain goes away but I'd rather not.
>Any ideas



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gary_m
October 6th 04, 03:37 AM
Thanks for all the good ideas.
I'm getting older(54) & am just trying to keep myself from becoming too
weak.
I never lifted weights in my life until about 2 years ago so I quite a
novice.


gary_m wrote:

> Are there any exercises that help a weak shoulder?
> I've had rotator cuff tendonitis in the past & since I've started
> bench pressing its coming back.
> If I lay off the bench press the pain goes away but I'd rather not.
> Any ideas
>