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DLAZ441
November 13th 04, 08:39 PM
I have read that being on a low calorie diet makes your metabolism slow down.
I would like to know how soon after starting a low calorie diet your metabolism
starts to slow down. Yes I agree a slow weight loss is best but I wonder if
being
on a low cal diet for 2 weeks or so would make my metabolism slower.

Thanks

Woody

Pat Styles
November 13th 04, 10:23 PM
"DLAZ441" > wrote in message
...
>I have read that being on a low calorie diet makes your metabolism slow down.
> I would like to know how soon after starting a low calorie diet your
> metabolism
> starts to slow down.

Not sure exactly and it probably differs by tons of variables. iow, it depends
($1 to lyle).

> Yes I agree a slow weight loss is best but I wonder if
> being on a low cal diet for 2 weeks or so would make my metabolism slower.

You might want to do some googling on leptin and refeeds. Keep an eye out for
elzi's and Lyle's posts on these topics. The basic idea is to periodically
break the low calorie days up with a high calorie day to get the body back into
the right status for losing weight again, which was interrupted by the low
calorie days (except they'll say it with a lot more technical words and stuff).
ps

gman99
November 14th 04, 04:21 AM
(DLAZ441) wrote:
> I have read that being on a low calorie diet makes your metabolism slow
> down. I would like to know how soon after starting a low calorie diet
> your metabolism starts to slow down. Yes I agree a slow weight loss is
> best but I wonder if being
> on a low cal diet for 2 weeks or so would make my metabolism slower.
>

Depends ?? How great is the caloric deficit ???

Lyle McDonald
November 14th 04, 04:51 PM
DLAZ441 wrote:

> I have read that being on a low calorie diet makes your metabolism slow down.
> I would like to know how soon after starting a low calorie diet your metabolism
> starts to slow down. Yes I agree a slow weight loss is best but I wonder if
> being
> on a low cal diet for 2 weeks or so would make my metabolism slower.
>
> Thanks

It depends and there is no single answer.

Generalizations:
a. the leaner you are, the sooner metabolic rate will start to decrease.
So someone at 15% bodyfat will see a drop sooner than someone at 35%
bodyfat

b. The more extreme the caloric deficit, the sooner the decrease. Under
very low calorie conditions, there can be a slight drop in metabolic
rate within 3-4 days (about 5% mainly related to a drop in sympathetic tone)

c. There is a genetic factor: some people's metabolisms drops harder and
faster than others. In general, women have it worse than men.

d. Eating more protein tends to limit the drop.

I'm probably forgetting a factor or two.

There is also the issue of when the drop becomes significant enough to
worry about. A few %age points drop may not amount ot anything that
important, a 10% drop may be worth worrying about.

If you're completely anal compulsive about it, you can track morning
temperature, alhtough you need to establish a baseline before starting
yoru diet. Normal morning temp is 97.8-98.2 which indicates 100% normal
resting metabolism. For every degree drop, your metabolism has gone
down somewhere between 5-7%.

Lyle

Bob MacWilliam
November 14th 04, 08:45 PM
"Lyle McDonald" > wrote in message
...
> DLAZ441 wrote:
>
>> I have read that being on a low calorie diet makes your metabolism slow
>> down.
>> I would like to know how soon after starting a low calorie diet your
>> metabolism
>> starts to slow down. Yes I agree a slow weight loss is best but I wonder
>> if
>> being
>> on a low cal diet for 2 weeks or so would make my metabolism slower.
>> Thanks
>
> It depends and there is no single answer.
>
> Generalizations:
> a. the leaner you are, the sooner metabolic rate will start to decrease.
> So someone at 15% bodyfat will see a drop sooner than someone at 35%
> bodyfat
>
> b. The more extreme the caloric deficit, the sooner the decrease. Under
> very low calorie conditions, there can be a slight drop in metabolic rate
> within 3-4 days (about 5% mainly related to a drop in sympathetic tone)
>
> c. There is a genetic factor: some people's metabolisms drops harder and
> faster than others. In general, women have it worse than men.
>
> d. Eating more protein tends to limit the drop.
>
> I'm probably forgetting a factor or two.
>
> There is also the issue of when the drop becomes significant enough to
> worry about. A few %age points drop may not amount ot anything that
> important, a 10% drop may be worth worrying about.
>
> If you're completely anal compulsive about it, you can track morning
> temperature, alhtough you need to establish a baseline before starting
> yoru diet. Normal morning temp is 97.8-98.2 which indicates 100% normal
> resting metabolism. For every degree drop, your metabolism has gone down
> somewhere between 5-7%.
>
> Lyle

So, for someone who complains that their weight (fat) loss has stopped after
a long and fairly successful dieting run, what would you say would be a good
approach to take? This is a person with a moderate cardio exercise
background but will begin more weights now.

I suggested taking at least a couple weeks off hard dieting and begin
tracking food with fitday so we can see what's going on. Then take another
run at dieting ensuring protein intake is adequate. From talking to her
before food tracking, my suspicion is protein intake is quite low. Should
we look at body temp monitoring as outlined and begin dieting only when temp
returns closer to normal? Or see what happens when protein levels are a
little closer and begin dieting again

The thing is, I think her willpower and compliance will be good. She's lost
50 lbs in 18 months and has alot of motivation to drop another 25 or so, but
from all indications her food intake is very low - too low, so I think a
little break is in order. Sounds like refeeds are worth a try too, when she
diets again.

Any thoughts or suggestions greatly appreciated. She has the will to lose
that last bit of weight so I want to do my best to give her proper advice.

Bob

Lyle McDonald
November 15th 04, 02:03 AM
Bob MacWilliam wrote:

> So, for someone who complains that their weight (fat) loss has stopped after
> a long and fairly successful dieting run, what would you say would be a good
> approach to take? This is a person with a moderate cardio exercise
> background but will begin more weights now.
>
> I suggested taking at least a couple weeks off hard dieting and begin
> tracking food with fitday so we can see what's going on. Then take another
> run at dieting ensuring protein intake is adequate. From talking to her
> before food tracking, my suspicion is protein intake is quite low. Should
> we look at body temp monitoring as outlined and begin dieting only when temp
> returns closer to normal? Or see what happens when protein levels are a
> little closer and begin dieting again

>
> The thing is, I think her willpower and compliance will be good. She's lost
> 50 lbs in 18 months and has alot of motivation to drop another 25 or so, but
> from all indications her food intake is very low - too low, so I think a
> little break is in order. Sounds like refeeds are worth a try too, when she
> diets again.
>
> Any thoughts or suggestions greatly appreciated. She has the will to lose
> that last bit of weight so I want to do my best to give her proper advice.

18 months of straight dieting is about 16 months too long without a
break IMO. A 2 week stretch at relatively normal calorie levels (figure
maintenance levels and adjust downwards slightly to compenate for
lowered metabolic rate, maybe 10%) and normal carbs (100 g/day or
higher) and protein would be the best approach. She'll probably lean
out a bit during that period (esp. during the first week) and she'll be
in a far better place to go back on a diet after that. Depending on her
leanness level, she may not want to diet straight for more than 6-8
weeks without taking some sort of break at this point.

Lyle

Graeme Neil
November 15th 04, 12:36 PM
Thanks for the article i found it really intersesting as this was good
advice for future reference while at the gym.

Bob MacWilliam
November 15th 04, 04:31 PM
"Lyle McDonald" > wrote in message
...
> Bob MacWilliam wrote:
>
>> So, for someone who complains that their weight (fat) loss has stopped
>> after a long and fairly successful dieting run, what would you say would
>> be a good approach to take? This is a person with a moderate cardio
>> exercise background but will begin more weights now.
>>
>> I suggested taking at least a couple weeks off hard dieting and begin
>> tracking food with fitday so we can see what's going on. Then take
>> another run at dieting ensuring protein intake is adequate. From talking
>> to her before food tracking, my suspicion is protein intake is quite low.
>> Should we look at body temp monitoring as outlined and begin dieting only
>> when temp returns closer to normal? Or see what happens when protein
>> levels are a little closer and begin dieting again
>
>>
>> The thing is, I think her willpower and compliance will be good. She's
>> lost 50 lbs in 18 months and has alot of motivation to drop another 25 or
>> so, but from all indications her food intake is very low - too low, so I
>> think a little break is in order. Sounds like refeeds are worth a try
>> too, when she diets again.
>>
>> Any thoughts or suggestions greatly appreciated. She has the will to
>> lose that last bit of weight so I want to do my best to give her proper
>> advice.
>
> 18 months of straight dieting is about 16 months too long without a break
> IMO. A 2 week stretch at relatively normal calorie levels (figure
> maintenance levels and adjust downwards slightly to compenate for lowered
> metabolic rate, maybe 10%) and normal carbs (100 g/day or higher) and
> protein would be the best approach. She'll probably lean out a bit during
> that period (esp. during the first week) and she'll be in a far better
> place to go back on a diet after that. Depending on her leanness level,
> she may not want to diet straight for more than 6-8 weeks without taking
> some sort of break at this point.
>
> Lyle

Thanks,

I was sure a break was in order and I'll make sure I'll tell her to do it
again in another few weeks as well.


Bob

rick++
November 16th 04, 03:11 PM
The impressive losses people see the first week or two are often due to
water changes as the body adjust to a diet, or to emptying out the
digestive system. I tell people dont even bother looking a scale for the
first two weeks- take your third week as a starting baseline.
Also only look at the scale once a week thereafter.