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Dave Smith
November 14th 04, 12:34 AM
I rememeber seeing some discussion some time ago about full body three
times a week programs. Now I'm contemplating such a program and I
can't find any reference to it. As I remember, the idea is to do one
set of a few exercises per body part per day three times a week. Can
I get a quick description about how this kind of program works?

I'm a 55 year old man and have lifted for several years. I tend to
over do it and am hoping that I can get a good workout without feeling
like I have to push myself as hard as I tend to do when I do a split
routine.

Thanks very much for any help.

Jim
November 14th 04, 03:08 AM
"Dave Smith" > wrote in message
...
>I rememeber seeing some discussion some time ago about full body three
> times a week programs. Now I'm contemplating such a program and I
> can't find any reference to it. As I remember, the idea is to do one
> set of a few exercises per body part per day three times a week. Can
> I get a quick description about how this kind of program works?
>
> I'm a 55 year old man and have lifted for several years. I tend to
> over do it and am hoping that I can get a good workout without feeling
> like I have to push myself as hard as I tend to do when I do a split
> routine.
>
> Thanks very much for any help.

The most minimalistic seems to be squat,bench,row.
3 times a week. You can use a variation of that with other stuff thrown in.

Jim

Tifosi Bob
November 14th 04, 04:38 AM
"Dave Smith" > wrote in message
...
> I rememeber seeing some discussion some time ago about full body three
> times a week programs. Now I'm contemplating such a program and I
> can't find any reference to it. As I remember, the idea is to do one
> set of a few exercises per body part per day three times a week. Can
> I get a quick description about how this kind of program works?
>
> I'm a 55 year old man and have lifted for several years. I tend to
> over do it and am hoping that I can get a good workout without feeling
> like I have to push myself as hard as I tend to do when I do a split
> routine.
>
> Thanks very much for any help.

For us old guys, rest is as important as the workout. You do need to recover
from the abuse you put your body through at the gym which is why I do
Monday-W-F or Tu-Th-Saturday. My workout frame work is the following:

cardio - 30 minutes - ? aiming for 15 calories/minute
abs - 4 sets X 15 reps each super set leg raise/crunch etc I like to do
abs early in the workout.
back - 4 sets X 15 reps each super set lat pull down/ sit-ups
legs - 4 sets X 15 reps each super set squats/leg curl (or calves or hams)
chest - 4 sets X 15 reps each super set bench/pullovers etc
shoulders - 4 sets X 15 reps each super set military press/ aux shoulder
movement
arms - 4 sets X 15 reps each super set close grip bench/ preacher curls (
your arms will get big doing this )
stretch - 10 minutes


POINTS
The whole workout takes ~80 - 90 minutes.

If you are feeling "lazy" do 3 sets X 15 reps each super set, this also
drops the worko time. If you want, go very light if you want to loose weight
or vein up, do 4 sets X 20 reps each super set.

Legs are done twice a week.

Above are only guidelines, you can mix up the exercises for each body part.

Eating right is also essentail, no chips and dip and lay off the butter.

8 - 9 hours of sleep each night is also beneficial.


Hope this helps,
Bob

John HUDSON
November 14th 04, 09:30 AM
On Sat, 13 Nov 2004 16:34:41 -0800, Dave Smith >
wrote:

>I rememeber seeing some discussion some time ago about full body three
>times a week programs. Now I'm contemplating such a program and I
>can't find any reference to it. As I remember, the idea is to do one
>set of a few exercises per body part per day three times a week. Can
>I get a quick description about how this kind of program works?
>
>I'm a 55 year old man and have lifted for several years. I tend to
>over do it and am hoping that I can get a good workout without feeling
>like I have to push myself as hard as I tend to do when I do a split
>routine.
>
>Thanks very much for any help.

When I get bored with my normal three days a week whole body routine,
I sometimes do a couple of weeks of full body circuit training. The
gym needs to be fairly quiet, which it is at 1130 - 1300 when I do my
training.

I change my routine completely and do 45 minutes CV work first, before
doing 3 circuits of 10 reps without a rest, using about two thirds
usual weight increments, of the following exercises, alternating upper
and lower body and fitting in abs and back:

Arm curl
Seated Leg Press
Triceps pull over - rope
Seated calf Press
Upright row
Seated Leg Curl
Military press
Adduction
Pec Deck
Abduction
Rev Pec Deck
Seated Leg Extension
Swiss Ball crunches
Lat Pull Down
Swiss Ball back extension
Press ups (horizontal)
Obliques

Warm down and good stretch.

Whole routine takes about 90 minutes.

It's great after the weights not to have to do the CV (which I've
already done), which is what I normally do, so the routine appears
much shorter.

The knock-on benefit is that it also helps shift a few stubborn lbs!!

Have a great Sunday - I will!!

rev
November 14th 04, 10:19 AM
John HUDSON > wrote in
:

> On Sat, 13 Nov 2004 16:34:41 -0800, Dave Smith >
> wrote:
>
>>I rememeber seeing some discussion some time ago about full body three
>>times a week programs. Now I'm contemplating such a program and I
>>can't find any reference to it. As I remember, the idea is to do one
>>set of a few exercises per body part per day three times a week. Can
>>I get a quick description about how this kind of program works?
>>
>>I'm a 55 year old man and have lifted for several years. I tend to
>>over do it and am hoping that I can get a good workout without feeling
>>like I have to push myself as hard as I tend to do when I do a split
>>routine.
>>
>>Thanks very much for any help.
>
> When I get bored with my normal three days a week whole body routine,
> I sometimes do a couple of weeks of full body circuit training. The
> gym needs to be fairly quiet, which it is at 1130 - 1300 when I do my
> training.
>
> I change my routine completely and do 45 minutes CV work first, before
> doing 3 circuits of 10 reps without a rest, using about two thirds
> usual weight increments, of the following exercises, alternating upper
> and lower body and fitting in abs and back:
>
> Arm curl
> Seated Leg Press
> Triceps pull over - rope
> Seated calf Press
> Upright row
> Seated Leg Curl
> Military press
> Adduction
> Pec Deck
> Abduction
> Rev Pec Deck
> Seated Leg Extension
> Swiss Ball crunches
> Lat Pull Down
> Swiss Ball back extension
> Press ups (horizontal)
> Obliques
>
> Warm down and good stretch.
>
> Whole routine takes about 90 minutes.
>
> It's great after the weights not to have to do the CV (which I've
> already done), which is what I normally do, so the routine appears
> much shorter.
>
> The knock-on benefit is that it also helps shift a few stubborn lbs!!
>
> Have a great Sunday - I will!!
>
>

ROFL.

Cheers

Per Elmsäter
November 14th 04, 10:41 AM
Tifosi Bob wrote:
> If you are feeling "lazy" do 3 sets X 15 reps each super set, this
> also drops the worko time. If you want, go very light if you want to
> loose weight or vein up, do 4 sets X 20 reps each super set.
>

What is a super set?

--
Perre
I gave up on SPAM and redirected it to hotmail instead.

John Hanson
November 14th 04, 10:47 AM
On Sat, 13 Nov 2004 23:38:12 -0500, "Tifosi Bob" > wrote in
misc.fitness.weights:

>
>"Dave Smith" > wrote in message
...
>> I rememeber seeing some discussion some time ago about full body three
>> times a week programs. Now I'm contemplating such a program and I
>> can't find any reference to it. As I remember, the idea is to do one
>> set of a few exercises per body part per day three times a week. Can
>> I get a quick description about how this kind of program works?
>>
>> I'm a 55 year old man and have lifted for several years. I tend to
>> over do it and am hoping that I can get a good workout without feeling
>> like I have to push myself as hard as I tend to do when I do a split
>> routine.
>>
>> Thanks very much for any help.
>
>For us old guys, rest is as important as the workout. You do need to recover
>from the abuse you put your body through at the gym which is why I do
>Monday-W-F or Tu-Th-Saturday. My workout frame work is the following:
>
>cardio - 30 minutes - ? aiming for 15 calories/minute
>abs - 4 sets X 15 reps each super set leg raise/crunch etc I like to do
>abs early in the workout.
>back - 4 sets X 15 reps each super set lat pull down/ sit-ups
>legs - 4 sets X 15 reps each super set squats/leg curl (or calves or hams)
>chest - 4 sets X 15 reps each super set bench/pullovers etc
>shoulders - 4 sets X 15 reps each super set military press/ aux shoulder
>movement
>arms - 4 sets X 15 reps each super set close grip bench/ preacher curls (
>your arms will get big doing this )
>stretch - 10 minutes
>
>
>POINTS
>The whole workout takes ~80 - 90 minutes.
>
>If you are feeling "lazy" do 3 sets X 15 reps each super set, this also
>drops the worko time. If you want, go very light if you want to loose weight
>or vein up, do 4 sets X 20 reps each super set.
>
>Legs are done twice a week.
>
>Above are only guidelines, you can mix up the exercises for each body part.
>
>Eating right is also essentail, no chips and dip and lay off the butter.
>
>8 - 9 hours of sleep each night is also beneficial.
>
>
Your routine is as stupid as your politics.

John HUDSON
November 14th 04, 12:21 PM
On 14 Nov 2004 21:09:36 +1050, rev > wrote:

>John HUDSON > wrote in
:
>
>> On Sat, 13 Nov 2004 16:34:41 -0800, Dave Smith >
>> wrote:
>>
>>>I rememeber seeing some discussion some time ago about full body three
>>>times a week programs. Now I'm contemplating such a program and I
>>>can't find any reference to it. As I remember, the idea is to do one
>>>set of a few exercises per body part per day three times a week. Can
>>>I get a quick description about how this kind of program works?
>>>
>>>I'm a 55 year old man and have lifted for several years. I tend to
>>>over do it and am hoping that I can get a good workout without feeling
>>>like I have to push myself as hard as I tend to do when I do a split
>>>routine.
>>>
>>>Thanks very much for any help.
>>
>> When I get bored with my normal three days a week whole body routine,
>> I sometimes do a couple of weeks of full body circuit training. The
>> gym needs to be fairly quiet, which it is at 1130 - 1300 when I do my
>> training.
>>
>> I change my routine completely and do 45 minutes CV work first, before
>> doing 3 circuits of 10 reps without a rest, using about two thirds
>> usual weight increments, of the following exercises, alternating upper
>> and lower body and fitting in abs and back:
>>
>> Arm curl
>> Seated Leg Press
>> Triceps pull over - rope
>> Seated calf Press
>> Upright row
>> Seated Leg Curl
>> Military press
>> Adduction
>> Pec Deck
>> Abduction
>> Rev Pec Deck
>> Seated Leg Extension
>> Swiss Ball crunches
>> Lat Pull Down
>> Swiss Ball back extension
>> Press ups (horizontal)
>> Obliques
>>
>> Warm down and good stretch.
>>
>> Whole routine takes about 90 minutes.
>>
>> It's great after the weights not to have to do the CV (which I've
>> already done), which is what I normally do, so the routine appears
>> much shorter.
>>
>> The knock-on benefit is that it also helps shift a few stubborn lbs!!
>>
>> Have a great Sunday - I will!!
>>
>>
>
>ROFL.
>
>Cheers

Always pleased to amuse your reverence!! ;o)

HAGS!!

Mistress Krista
November 14th 04, 01:07 PM
"Dave Smith" > wrote in message
...
>I rememeber seeing some discussion some time ago about full body three
> times a week programs. Now I'm contemplating such a program and I
> can't find any reference to it. As I remember, the idea is to do one
> set of a few exercises per body part per day three times a week. Can
> I get a quick description about how this kind of program works?


Put together a basic arrangement of movement types:

-1 to 2 squatting type movements (squats, deadlifts, lunges, step-ups, etc.)
-1 to 2 pushing type movements (bench presses, overhead presses, pushups,
etc.)
-1 to 2 pulling type movements (shrugs, rows, pullups/pulldowns, etc.)
-1 midsection exercise (abs, lower back, obliques, etc.)
-1 calf exercise

Find a few good compound exercises that meet the criteria above, arrange
them into a workout, and voila. One thing I like is having a heavy, medium,
and light workout in a week. So perhaps heavy could be squats, rows, bench
presses done at somewhere around 80%; in contrast, light could be step-ups,
pushups, pullups (hey, all of these have the word "up" in
them--coincidence?) done for higher reps.

Never go to failure intentionally. Keep a few reps left in the tank at all
times.

Voila!

Krista

--
http://www.stumptuous.com/weights.html
http://www.trans-health.com
mistresskrista at stumptuous dot com

Bob MacWilliam
November 14th 04, 06:14 PM
"Mistress Krista" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Dave Smith" > wrote in message
> ...
>>I rememeber seeing some discussion some time ago about full body three
>> times a week programs. Now I'm contemplating such a program and I
>> can't find any reference to it. As I remember, the idea is to do one
>> set of a few exercises per body part per day three times a week. Can
>> I get a quick description about how this kind of program works?
>
>
> Put together a basic arrangement of movement types:
>
> -1 to 2 squatting type movements (squats, deadlifts, lunges, step-ups,
> etc.)
> -1 to 2 pushing type movements (bench presses, overhead presses, pushups,
> etc.)
> -1 to 2 pulling type movements (shrugs, rows, pullups/pulldowns, etc.)
> -1 midsection exercise (abs, lower back, obliques, etc.)
> -1 calf exercise
>
> Find a few good compound exercises that meet the criteria above, arrange
> them into a workout, and voila. One thing I like is having a heavy,
> medium, and light workout in a week. So perhaps heavy could be squats,
> rows, bench presses done at somewhere around 80%; in contrast, light could
> be step-ups, pushups, pullups (hey, all of these have the word "up" in
> them--coincidence?) done for higher reps.
>
> Never go to failure intentionally. Keep a few reps left in the tank at all
> times.
>
> Voila!
>
> Krista

Agree. I would just add that try to add some weight each cycle, or as often
as possible without sacrificing form. At least add to the medium or heavy
days as often as you can.

You can also add some variety in the rep ranges too. Hmm.... sounds like a
program I read about somewhere :-)

Bob

Hugh Beyer
November 15th 04, 02:31 AM
Dave Smith > wrote in
:

> I rememeber seeing some discussion some time ago about full body three
> times a week programs. Now I'm contemplating such a program and I
> can't find any reference to it. As I remember, the idea is to do one
> set of a few exercises per body part per day three times a week. Can
> I get a quick description about how this kind of program works?
>
> I'm a 55 year old man and have lifted for several years. I tend to
> over do it and am hoping that I can get a good workout without feeling
> like I have to push myself as hard as I tend to do when I do a split
> routine.
>
> Thanks very much for any help.

http://www.hypertrophy-specific.com/hst_index.html

Hugh


--
One puppy had its dewclaws removed in the creation of this post, but for
reasons of hygene and it really doesn't hurt them at all.

Dave Smith
November 15th 04, 02:48 AM
On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 08:07:51 -0500, "Mistress Krista"
> wrote:

>
>"Dave Smith" > wrote in message
...
>>I rememeber seeing some discussion some time ago about full body three
>> times a week programs. Now I'm contemplating such a program and I
>> can't find any reference to it. As I remember, the idea is to do one
>> set of a few exercises per body part per day three times a week. Can
>> I get a quick description about how this kind of program works?
>
>
>Put together a basic arrangement of movement types:
>
>-1 to 2 squatting type movements (squats, deadlifts, lunges, step-ups, etc.)
>-1 to 2 pushing type movements (bench presses, overhead presses, pushups,
>etc.)
>-1 to 2 pulling type movements (shrugs, rows, pullups/pulldowns, etc.)
>-1 midsection exercise (abs, lower back, obliques, etc.)
>-1 calf exercise
>
>Find a few good compound exercises that meet the criteria above, arrange
>them into a workout, and voila. One thing I like is having a heavy, medium,
>and light workout in a week. So perhaps heavy could be squats, rows, bench
>presses done at somewhere around 80%; in contrast, light could be step-ups,
>pushups, pullups (hey, all of these have the word "up" in
>them--coincidence?) done for higher reps.
>
>Never go to failure intentionally. Keep a few reps left in the tank at all
>times.
>
>Voila!
>
>Krista

Thanks Krista.

I visited your site (excellent BTW) and see that you recommend several
sets of one exercise rather than one set each of several exercises.
Not to argue, just to understand, what's the reasoning? Is it better
to hit, say, chest with incline several sets on one day and flat
several sets another? I see that several of the exercises you
recommend are compound movements that hit several areas. Is this part
of the logic?

Thanks very much.

Tifosi Bob
November 15th 04, 03:42 AM
"Per Elmsäter" > wrote in message
...
> Tifosi Bob wrote:
> > If you are feeling "lazy" do 3 sets X 15 reps each super set, this
> > also drops the worko time. If you want, go very light if you want to
> > loose weight or vein up, do 4 sets X 20 reps each super set.
> >
>
> What is a super set?


a superset is doing eg legs - 15 reps squat then IMMEDIATELY doing 15
reps of leg extensions etc

doing a primary then auxilillary exercise on the target muscle group

Tifosi Bob
November 15th 04, 03:52 AM
Dave

Do my workout you little pussy...

gman99
November 15th 04, 01:33 PM
Dave Smith > wrote:
> I rememeber seeing some discussion some time ago about full body three
> times a week programs. Now I'm contemplating such a program and I
> can't find any reference to it. As I remember, the idea is to do one
> set of a few exercises per body part per day three times a week. Can
> I get a quick description about how this kind of program works?
>
> I'm a 55 year old man and have lifted for several years. I tend to
> over do it and am hoping that I can get a good workout without feeling
> like I have to push myself as hard as I tend to do when I do a split
> routine.
>

Look up HST...this program is a full body workout...you can always modify
it to suit your goals.

gman99
November 15th 04, 01:42 PM
Dave Smith > wrote:
> I rememeber seeing some discussion some time ago about full body three
> times a week programs. Now I'm contemplating such a program and I
> can't find any reference to it. As I remember, the idea is to do one
> set of a few exercises per body part per day three times a week. Can
> I get a quick description about how this kind of program works?
>
> I'm a 55 year old man and have lifted for several years. I tend to
> over do it and am hoping that I can get a good workout without feeling
> like I have to push myself as hard as I tend to do when I do a split
> routine.
>
> Thanks very much for any help.

My routine now (after a few decades of a split):

I generally work out Tue, Thu, Sat or Sun (depends on when I can get out
for a round of golf)..

I mix up the actual exercises...but I hit all the major groups:

2 x chest
2 x lats
1 x bicep
1 x tri
1 x delts
2 x traps

30 minutes of cardio (usually stair climbing). On my off day I'll sometimes
get in for an hour of cardio...

I'll change exercises / number of reps each week....my goal is to keep fit,
I'm not trying to make gains...just keep what I have.

Helgi Briem
November 15th 04, 01:49 PM
On 15 Nov 2004 13:42:18 GMT, (gman99) wrote:

>I mix up the actual exercises...but I hit all the major groups:
>
>2 x chest
>2 x lats
>1 x bicep
>1 x tri
>1 x delts
>2 x traps

Que? Seems to me you're missing quite a few *major* groups
of muscles. What about the quadriceps, glutes, hamstrings,
calves?


--
Helgi Briem hbriem AT simnet DOT is

A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
Q: Why is top-posting such a bad thing?
A: Top-posting.
Q: What is the most annoying thing on usenet and in e-mail?

gman99
November 15th 04, 02:34 PM
Helgi Briem > wrote:
> On 15 Nov 2004 13:42:18 GMT, (gman99) wrote:
>
> >I mix up the actual exercises...but I hit all the major groups:
> >
> >2 x chest
> >2 x lats
> >1 x bicep
> >1 x tri
> >1 x delts
> >2 x traps
>
> Que? Seems to me you're missing quite a few *major* groups
> of muscles. What about the quadriceps, glutes, hamstrings,
> calves?

I mentioned STAIR climbing didn't I :) ...my legs are just fine (to me) I
find that the cardio keeps them well worked. I used to work my legs, quite
a while ago but not anymore...I also cycle a lot in the summer...

Bluesman
November 15th 04, 03:26 PM
Dave Smith > wrote in message >...
> I rememeber seeing some discussion some time ago about full body three
> times a week programs. Now I'm contemplating such a program and I
> can't find any reference to it. As I remember, the idea is to do one
> set of a few exercises per body part per day three times a week. Can
> I get a quick description about how this kind of program works?
>
> I'm a 55 year old man and have lifted for several years. I tend to
> over do it and am hoping that I can get a good workout without feeling
> like I have to push myself as hard as I tend to do when I do a split
> routine.
>
> Thanks very much for any help.


why not HST if you want a full body workout 3x/week? You hit the
whole body, have a structured program, and have the needed time to
recuperate between cycles...


Bluesman

Adam Fahy
November 15th 04, 05:10 PM
Bully wrote:

> Most supersets are based on antagonist muscles!

Not really. It's a whole big world out there.


> To be fair, if you can even
> get as far as the leg extension machine after a set of squats I would
> question how much intensity you are putting into your w/out!

But that's the point, to generate even more fatigue for a particular
muscle group.


-Adam (err, not that I mean to advocate "Bob"'s workout advice)

00doc
November 15th 04, 05:37 PM
"Mistress Krista" > wrote in message >...
> "Dave Smith" > wrote in message
> ...
> >I rememeber seeing some discussion some time ago about full body three
> > times a week programs. Now I'm contemplating such a program and I
> > can't find any reference to it. As I remember, the idea is to do one
> > set of a few exercises per body part per day three times a week. Can
> > I get a quick description about how this kind of program works?
>
>
> Put together a basic arrangement of movement types:
>
> -1 to 2 squatting type movements (squats, deadlifts, lunges, step-ups, etc.)
> -1 to 2 pushing type movements (bench presses, overhead presses, pushups,
> etc.)
> -1 to 2 pulling type movements (shrugs, rows, pullups/pulldowns, etc.)
> -1 midsection exercise (abs, lower back, obliques, etc.)
> -1 calf exercise
>
> Find a few good compound exercises that meet the criteria above, arrange
> them into a workout, and voila. One thing I like is having a heavy, medium,
> and light workout in a week. So perhaps heavy could be squats, rows, bench
> presses done at somewhere around 80%; in contrast, light could be step-ups,
> pushups, pullups (hey, all of these have the word "up" in
> them--coincidence?) done for higher reps.
>
> Never go to failure intentionally. Keep a few reps left in the tank at all
> times.

I think you raise some good points with using compound exersizes
instead of isolation ones to be more efficient. I also like the idea
of varying the intensity levels. However....

Why do the same workout - or basically the same intensity with
different exersizes - three days per week. It seems to me that unless
you really don;t push yourself (as you seemt to advocate) there will
not be enough recovery time - especially for an "older" (I feel it and
he has a few years on me) lifter for whom revovery is usually the big
issue.

Why not either split the routine into two groups and just alternate
workouts? e.g. split it into push/pull - do push Monday and Friday of
one week and then Wednessday of the next and the pull on the other
days (using MWF schedule). [I used to do this with great results and
have considered going back to it.] Or at the very least, if you do not
want to do a complete split, do heavy pushing Mon-Fri-Wed with light
pulling and then switch on the other days.

It seems to me it would be better to do a short intense workout (i.e.
go ahead and go to failure) with adequate rest in between than to just
go through a submax routine over and over again.

--
00doc

Lyle McDonald
November 15th 04, 05:45 PM
00doc wrote:

> It seems to me it would be better to do a short intense workout (i.e.
> go ahead and go to failure) with adequate rest in between than to just
> go through a submax routine over and over again.

And yet it's not.

Lyle

Lyle McDonald
November 15th 04, 07:45 PM
Bully wrote:

> Adam Fahy wrote:
>
>>Bully wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Most supersets are based on antagonist muscles!
>>
>>Not really. It's a whole big world out there.
>
>
> Can you be more specific?
>

supersetting doesn't automtically refer to alternating antagonistic
muscles. even those who do can mean different things. Biceps curl
staright into triceps extensiosn with no rest is the more common use of
the term but many strength caoches like to antagonistic superset
exercises with a normal rest period. For example

biceps curl: 3 sets of 6-8/1.5' rest alternated with
triceps extension: 3 sets of 6-8/1.5' rest

Where you do curls, rest 1.5', triceps, rest 1.5', curls, until all sets
are done. This allows for longer rest periods (and may improve recovery
between sets of teh same exercise) between a set of the same exercise
without you having to sit around the gym picking your butt.

Many use the term superset to refer to training the same muscle one
right after another.

For example barbell curl straight into concentration curl or bench
straight into pec deck/flyes. This might be more usefully called a
compound set.

of course, when you add a third exercise for the same bodyaprt, it's a
triset, more than that and it becomes a giant set.

Lyle

aj
November 15th 04, 07:56 PM
On 2004-11-15, Lyle McDonald > wrote:
> Bully wrote:
>
>> Adam Fahy wrote:
>>
>>>Bully wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>Most supersets are based on antagonist muscles!
>>>
>>>Not really. It's a whole big world out there.
>>
>>
>> Can you be more specific?
>>
>
> supersetting doesn't automtically refer to alternating antagonistic
> muscles. even those who do can mean different things. Biceps curl
> staright into triceps extensiosn with no rest is the more common use of
> the term but many strength caoches like to antagonistic superset
> exercises with a normal rest period. For example
>
> biceps curl: 3 sets of 6-8/1.5' rest alternated with
> triceps extension: 3 sets of 6-8/1.5' rest
>
> Where you do curls, rest 1.5', triceps, rest 1.5', curls, until all sets
> are done. This allows for longer rest periods (and may improve recovery
> between sets of teh same exercise) between a set of the same exercise
> without you having to sit around the gym picking your butt.
>
> Many use the term superset to refer to training the same muscle one
> right after another.
>
> For example barbell curl straight into concentration curl or bench
> straight into pec deck/flyes. This might be more usefully called a
> compound set.
>
> of course, when you add a third exercise for the same bodyaprt, it's a
> triset, more than that and it becomes a giant set.
>
> Lyle

I have never heard triset. After super I've always heard giant.

Strange conventions.

--
-aj
You could also call it "hogging".

Lyle McDonald
November 15th 04, 08:12 PM
aj wrote:

> On 2004-11-15, Lyle McDonald > wrote:
>
>>Bully wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Adam Fahy wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>Bully wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Most supersets are based on antagonist muscles!
>>>>
>>>>Not really. It's a whole big world out there.
>>>
>>>
>>>Can you be more specific?
>>>
>>
>>supersetting doesn't automtically refer to alternating antagonistic
>>muscles. even those who do can mean different things. Biceps curl
>>staright into triceps extensiosn with no rest is the more common use of
>>the term but many strength caoches like to antagonistic superset
>>exercises with a normal rest period. For example
>>
>>biceps curl: 3 sets of 6-8/1.5' rest alternated with
>>triceps extension: 3 sets of 6-8/1.5' rest
>>
>>Where you do curls, rest 1.5', triceps, rest 1.5', curls, until all sets
>>are done. This allows for longer rest periods (and may improve recovery
>>between sets of teh same exercise) between a set of the same exercise
>>without you having to sit around the gym picking your butt.
>>
>>Many use the term superset to refer to training the same muscle one
>>right after another.
>>
>>For example barbell curl straight into concentration curl or bench
>>straight into pec deck/flyes. This might be more usefully called a
>>compound set.
>>
>>of course, when you add a third exercise for the same bodyaprt, it's a
>>triset, more than that and it becomes a giant set.
>>
>>Lyle
>
>
> I have never heard triset. After super I've always heard giant.

Which would make more sense considering we count:

1,2, many.

>
> Strange conventions.

I think my favorite 'scientific' training protocol would have to be
I go, you go.

Lyle

Per Elmsäter
November 15th 04, 09:58 PM
Tifosi Bob wrote:
> "Per Elmsäter" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Tifosi Bob wrote:
>>> If you are feeling "lazy" do 3 sets X 15 reps each super set, this
>>> also drops the worko time. If you want, go very light if you want to
>>> loose weight or vein up, do 4 sets X 20 reps each super set.
>>>
>>
>> What is a super set?
>
>
> a superset is doing eg legs - 15 reps squat then IMMEDIATELY doing
> 15 reps of leg extensions etc
>
> doing a primary then auxilillary exercise on the target muscle group

Thanks I've got it now.
Regarding your example I'm doing these exercises on leg days

Dumbbell squat 3*12 ( 60 kg )
Lying leg curl 3*12 ( 50 kg )
Standing calf raise 3*12 ( 106 kg )
Leg Extension 3*12 ( 63 kg )
Assorted back and abs exercises

My leg Extensions at the end sure felt like a super set the first couple of
times ;) Now that I'm on the third week of this program it feels a lot
better. Like I raise the weights for both almost every second workout and I
can still do the legextensions with good form. The first week they really
hurt from the first one and counting. A little weird 'cause I'd been doing
both Lunges and Leg extensions for a month before that.
So what I'm thinking is that at the end of the six weeks maybe I could start
crunching those together in a superset before I move on to my next program.

--
Perre
I gave up on SPAM and redirected it to hotmail instead.

aj
November 16th 04, 03:18 AM
On 2004-11-15, Lyle McDonald > wrote:
> aj wrote:
>
>> On 2004-11-15, Lyle McDonald > wrote:
>>
>>>Bully wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>Adam Fahy wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Bully wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>Most supersets are based on antagonist muscles!
>>>>>
>>>>>Not really. It's a whole big world out there.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>Can you be more specific?
>>>>
>>>
>>>supersetting doesn't automtically refer to alternating antagonistic
>>>muscles. even those who do can mean different things. Biceps curl
>>>staright into triceps extensiosn with no rest is the more common use of
>>>the term but many strength caoches like to antagonistic superset
>>>exercises with a normal rest period. For example
>>>
>>>biceps curl: 3 sets of 6-8/1.5' rest alternated with
>>>triceps extension: 3 sets of 6-8/1.5' rest
>>>
>>>Where you do curls, rest 1.5', triceps, rest 1.5', curls, until all sets
>>>are done. This allows for longer rest periods (and may improve recovery
>>>between sets of teh same exercise) between a set of the same exercise
>>>without you having to sit around the gym picking your butt.
>>>
>>>Many use the term superset to refer to training the same muscle one
>>>right after another.
>>>
>>>For example barbell curl straight into concentration curl or bench
>>>straight into pec deck/flyes. This might be more usefully called a
>>>compound set.
>>>
>>>of course, when you add a third exercise for the same bodyaprt, it's a
>>>triset, more than that and it becomes a giant set.
>>>
>>>Lyle
>>
>>
>> I have never heard triset. After super I've always heard giant.
>
> Which would make more sense considering we count:
>
> 1,2, many.

Visually we count 1, 2, 3, 4, [5,] many.

If you look at a group of something real fast, most people can only ID
groups of up to 4 or 5. After that you start looking at 2 groups of 3 or
5 and 1.

But I suppose this is behavorial counting.

>> Strange conventions.
>
> I think my favorite 'scientific' training protocol would have to be
> I go, you go.
>
> Lyle

--
-aj

Lyle McDonald
November 16th 04, 06:36 PM
aj wrote:
> On 2004-11-15, Lyle McDonald > wrote:
>
>>aj wrote:

>>>I have never heard triset. After super I've always heard giant.
>>
>>Which would make more sense considering we count:
>>
>>1,2, many.
>
>
> Visually we count 1, 2, 3, 4, [5,] many.
>
> If you look at a group of something real fast, most people can only ID
> groups of up to 4 or 5. After that you start looking at 2 groups of 3 or
> 5 and 1.
>
> But I suppose this is behavorial counting.

Christ you know how to ruin a joke, you need to bone up on your MFW history.

A while back (years?), there was some study showing that some animal
(primates probably) appear to count more or less as 1,2 many.

This became a running joke on mfw, thanks in no small part to Tom Morley
(where is he lately).

**** it, nevermind, any joke you have to explain....

Lyle

Michael Siemon
November 16th 04, 07:56 PM
In article >,
Lyle McDonald > wrote:

> aj wrote:
> > On 2004-11-15, Lyle McDonald > wrote:
> >
> >>aj wrote:
>
> >>>I have never heard triset. After super I've always heard giant.
> >>
> >>Which would make more sense considering we count:
> >>
> >>1,2, many.
> >
> >
> > Visually we count 1, 2, 3, 4, [5,] many.
> >
> > If you look at a group of something real fast, most people can only ID
> > groups of up to 4 or 5. After that you start looking at 2 groups of 3 or
> > 5 and 1.
> >
> > But I suppose this is behavorial counting.
>
> Christ you know how to ruin a joke, you need to bone up on your MFW history.
>
> A while back (years?), there was some study showing that some animal
> (primates probably) appear to count more or less as 1,2 many.
>
> This became a running joke on mfw, thanks in no small part to Tom Morley
> (where is he lately).
>
> **** it, nevermind, any joke you have to explain....
>
> Lyle

Hey; I didn't know the mfw history (just started following this
froup), but as a mathematician I sure chuckled at the joke...

aj
November 16th 04, 08:07 PM
On 2004-11-16, Michael Siemon > wrote:
> In article >,
> Lyle McDonald > wrote:
>
>> aj wrote:
>> > On 2004-11-15, Lyle McDonald > wrote:
>> >
>> >>aj wrote:
>>
>> >>>I have never heard triset. After super I've always heard giant.
>> >>
>> >>Which would make more sense considering we count:
>> >>
>> >>1,2, many.
>> >
>> >
>> > Visually we count 1, 2, 3, 4, [5,] many.
>> >
>> > If you look at a group of something real fast, most people can only ID
>> > groups of up to 4 or 5. After that you start looking at 2 groups of 3 or
>> > 5 and 1.
>> >
>> > But I suppose this is behavorial counting.
>>
>> Christ you know how to ruin a joke, you need to bone up on your MFW history.
>>
>> A while back (years?), there was some study showing that some animal
>> (primates probably) appear to count more or less as 1,2 many.
>>
>> This became a running joke on mfw, thanks in no small part to Tom Morley
>> (where is he lately).
>>
>> **** it, nevermind, any joke you have to explain....
>>
>> Lyle
>
> Hey; I didn't know the mfw history (just started following this
> froup), but as a mathematician I sure chuckled at the joke...

It was late. It was early. I was drunk. I was sober. The hot tub
fried my brain.

I don't have any more excuses.

--
-aj

bc
November 18th 04, 08:42 PM
Dave Smith > wrote in message >...
> I rememeber seeing some discussion some time ago about full body three
> times a week programs. Now I'm contemplating such a program and I
> can't find any reference to it. As I remember, the idea is to do one
> set of a few exercises per body part per day three times a week. Can
> I get a quick description about how this kind of program works?
>
> I'm a 55 year old man and have lifted for several years. I tend to
> over do it and am hoping that I can get a good workout without feeling
> like I have to push myself as hard as I tend to do when I do a split
> routine.
>
> Thanks very much for any help.

Here's the one I'm returning to after my layoff.
It takes 45 mins, all 3 sets of 5 to 8 reps.

Squat and/or Deadlift depending on how tired or pressed for time I am
db Bench
Cable Row
db Overhead Press
Chins
Standing Calf Raises

Sometimes I throw in some triceps pushdowns or curls for fun, but
often not. If I do a heavy squat day, I don't do dl's until the next
workout and vice-versa.

- bc