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View Full Version : What is the best form of barbell squat?


wonderer
November 17th 04, 04:45 PM
Should I put 1 1/2 thick book on the hill or
flat foot?

The book I have says "putting a book or wood stick that levels up the
hill slightly high on the ground."

One website about squat says "flat foot".

Keith Hobman
November 17th 04, 04:51 PM
In article >,
(wonderer) wrote:

> Should I put 1 1/2 thick book on the hill or
> flat foot?
>
> The book I have says "putting a book or wood stick that levels up the
> hill slightly high on the ground."
>
> One website about squat says "flat foot".

It depends.

If you are trying to lift a maximal weight for powerlifting generally
using a wide stance and keeping the knees back is more productive.

If you are going ass-to-the-grass as in a weightlifting assistance
exercise a heel is generally better as it leaves you lower back and pelvis
in a better position.

If neither is your goal than it really doesn't make that much difference.
As well there are very good powerlifters who use a heel and very good
weightlifters who lift in a flat shoe.

bc
November 18th 04, 05:04 PM
(Keith Hobman) wrote in message >...
> In article >,
> (wonderer) wrote:
>
> > Should I put 1 1/2 thick book on the hill or
> > flat foot?
> >
> > The book I have says "putting a book or wood stick that levels up the
> > hill slightly high on the ground."
> >
> > One website about squat says "flat foot".
>
> It depends.
>
> If you are trying to lift a maximal weight for powerlifting generally
> using a wide stance and keeping the knees back is more productive.
>
> If you are going ass-to-the-grass as in a weightlifting assistance
> exercise a heel is generally better as it leaves you lower back and pelvis
> in a better position.
>
> If neither is your goal than it really doesn't make that much difference.
> As well there are very good powerlifters who use a heel and very good
> weightlifters who lift in a flat shoe.

Yeah, but 1-1/2 inches under the heel? I think it's probably better
for a beginner to just work on the flexibility and squat flat foot.
It scares me to think about that stick or book back there with heavy
weight on the bar and backing up over the stick, possibly tripping or
stumbling on it. Heels in the shoes are different, I realize.

- bc

Keith Hobman
November 18th 04, 05:31 PM
In article >,
(bc) wrote:

> (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
>...
> > In article >,
> > (wonderer) wrote:
> >
> > > Should I put 1 1/2 thick book on the hill or
> > > flat foot?
> > >
> > > The book I have says "putting a book or wood stick that levels up the
> > > hill slightly high on the ground."
> > >
> > > One website about squat says "flat foot".
> >
> > It depends.
> >
> > If you are trying to lift a maximal weight for powerlifting generally
> > using a wide stance and keeping the knees back is more productive.
> >
> > If you are going ass-to-the-grass as in a weightlifting assistance
> > exercise a heel is generally better as it leaves you lower back and pelvis
> > in a better position.
> >
> > If neither is your goal than it really doesn't make that much difference.
> > As well there are very good powerlifters who use a heel and very good
> > weightlifters who lift in a flat shoe.
>
> Yeah, but 1-1/2 inches under the heel? I think it's probably better
> for a beginner to just work on the flexibility and squat flat foot.
> It scares me to think about that stick or book back there with heavy
> weight on the bar and backing up over the stick, possibly tripping or
> stumbling on it. Heels in the shoes are different, I realize.

I dunno. If you can't get onto a board or plate without tripping I'm not
sure you should be squatting...

Lee Michaels
November 18th 04, 05:37 PM
"Keith Hobman" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> (bc) wrote:
>
> > (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
> >...
> > > In article >,
> > > (wonderer) wrote:
> > >
> > > > Should I put 1 1/2 thick book on the hill or
> > > > flat foot?
> > > >
> > > > The book I have says "putting a book or wood stick that levels up
the
> > > > hill slightly high on the ground."
> > > >
> > > > One website about squat says "flat foot".
> > >
> > > It depends.
> > >
> > > If you are trying to lift a maximal weight for powerlifting generally
> > > using a wide stance and keeping the knees back is more productive.
> > >
> > > If you are going ass-to-the-grass as in a weightlifting assistance
> > > exercise a heel is generally better as it leaves you lower back and
pelvis
> > > in a better position.
> > >
> > > If neither is your goal than it really doesn't make that much
difference.
> > > As well there are very good powerlifters who use a heel and very good
> > > weightlifters who lift in a flat shoe.
> >
> > Yeah, but 1-1/2 inches under the heel? I think it's probably better
> > for a beginner to just work on the flexibility and squat flat foot.
> > It scares me to think about that stick or book back there with heavy
> > weight on the bar and backing up over the stick, possibly tripping or
> > stumbling on it. Heels in the shoes are different, I realize.
>
> I dunno. If you can't get onto a board or plate without tripping I'm not
> sure you should be squatting...

And an inch and a half is the height of the average 2 X 4. Along with
plywood, these are found often in home gyms for blocks, etc. Cheap and
versatile. They are often used in both gyms and other places where a small,
simple board can be used in many ways.

Except, of course, in those fancy chrome and fern psuedo gyms.

billydee
November 18th 04, 11:42 PM
(Keith Hobman) wrote in message >...
> In article >,
> (wonderer) wrote:
>
> > Should I put 1 1/2 thick book on the hill or
> > flat foot?
> >
> > The book I have says "putting a book or wood stick that levels up the
> > hill slightly high on the ground."
> >
> > One website about squat says "flat foot".
>
> It depends.
>
You forgot to give your 1$ to Lyle for that answer. ;)

Keith Hobman
November 18th 04, 11:44 PM
In article >,
(billydee) wrote:

> (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
>...
> > In article >,
> > (wonderer) wrote:
> >
> > > Should I put 1 1/2 thick book on the hill or
> > > flat foot?
> > >
> > > The book I have says "putting a book or wood stick that levels up the
> > > hill slightly high on the ground."
> > >
> > > One website about squat says "flat foot".
> >
> > It depends.
> >
> You forgot to give your 1$ to Lyle for that answer. ;)

He's sent the collection agency after me...

bc
November 19th 04, 05:23 PM
(Keith Hobman) wrote in message >...
> In article >,
> (billydee) wrote:
>
> > (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
> >...
> > > In article >,
> > > (wonderer) wrote:
> > >
> > > > Should I put 1 1/2 thick book on the hill or
> > > > flat foot?
> > > >
> > > > The book I have says "putting a book or wood stick that levels up the
> > > > hill slightly high on the ground."
> > > >
> > > > One website about squat says "flat foot".
> > >
> > > It depends.
> > >
> > You forgot to give your 1$ to Lyle for that answer. ;)
>
> He's sent the collection agency after me...


I pretty much just salute in the direction of Austin every once in a
while. Is there some expiration period on coined phrases when they
become public domain?

- bc

bc
November 19th 04, 05:26 PM
(Keith Hobman) wrote in message >...
> In article >,
> (bc) wrote:
>
> > (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
> >...
> > > In article >,
> > > (wonderer) wrote:
> > >
> > > > Should I put 1 1/2 thick book on the hill or
> > > > flat foot?
> > > >
> > > > The book I have says "putting a book or wood stick that levels up the
> > > > hill slightly high on the ground."
> > > >
> > > > One website about squat says "flat foot".
> > >
> > > It depends.
> > >
> > > If you are trying to lift a maximal weight for powerlifting generally
> > > using a wide stance and keeping the knees back is more productive.
> > >
> > > If you are going ass-to-the-grass as in a weightlifting assistance
> > > exercise a heel is generally better as it leaves you lower back and pelvis
> > > in a better position.
> > >
> > > If neither is your goal than it really doesn't make that much difference.
> > > As well there are very good powerlifters who use a heel and very good
> > > weightlifters who lift in a flat shoe.
> >
> > Yeah, but 1-1/2 inches under the heel? I think it's probably better
> > for a beginner to just work on the flexibility and squat flat foot.
> > It scares me to think about that stick or book back there with heavy
> > weight on the bar and backing up over the stick, possibly tripping or
> > stumbling on it. Heels in the shoes are different, I realize.
>
> I dunno. If you can't get onto a board or plate without tripping I'm not
> sure you should be squatting...

True. I still think the flexibility is worth striving for though,
especially for a newbie. Why confound the movement with boards and
stuff until you're sure you need it?

- bc

Lee Michaels
November 19th 04, 06:00 PM
"bc" > wrote in message
om...
> (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
>...
> > In article >,
> > (bc) wrote:
> >
> > > (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
> > >...
> > > > In article >,
> > > > (wonderer) wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > Should I put 1 1/2 thick book on the hill or
> > > > > flat foot?
> > > > >
> > > > > The book I have says "putting a book or wood stick that levels up
the
> > > > > hill slightly high on the ground."
> > > > >
> > > > > One website about squat says "flat foot".
> > > >
> > > > It depends.
> > > >
> > > > If you are trying to lift a maximal weight for powerlifting
generally
> > > > using a wide stance and keeping the knees back is more productive.
> > > >
> > > > If you are going ass-to-the-grass as in a weightlifting assistance
> > > > exercise a heel is generally better as it leaves you lower back and
pelvis
> > > > in a better position.
> > > >
> > > > If neither is your goal than it really doesn't make that much
difference.
> > > > As well there are very good powerlifters who use a heel and very
good
> > > > weightlifters who lift in a flat shoe.
> > >
> > > Yeah, but 1-1/2 inches under the heel? I think it's probably better
> > > for a beginner to just work on the flexibility and squat flat foot.
> > > It scares me to think about that stick or book back there with heavy
> > > weight on the bar and backing up over the stick, possibly tripping or
> > > stumbling on it. Heels in the shoes are different, I realize.
> >
> > I dunno. If you can't get onto a board or plate without tripping I'm not
> > sure you should be squatting...
>
> True. I still think the flexibility is worth striving for though,
> especially for a newbie. Why confound the movement with boards and
> stuff until you're sure you need it?
>
You over estimate some newbie's ability to do squats.

I have had folks do free standing squats for three months before I let them
touch a bar. I have had others use a rope or chain for awhile before they
graduated to grabbing an upright with their hand. And from there they work
up to free standing squats.

Some folks couldn't do a squat if you paid them a million bucks. For those
folks, an aid of some kind is not optional.

It says something about our inactive lifestyles whn adults lose the ability
that they all had as children.

Keith Hobman
November 19th 04, 06:33 PM
In article >,
(bc) wrote:

> (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
>...
> > In article >,
> > (billydee) wrote:
> >
> > > (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
> > >...
> > > > In article >,
> > > > (wonderer) wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > Should I put 1 1/2 thick book on the hill or
> > > > > flat foot?
> > > > >
> > > > > The book I have says "putting a book or wood stick that levels up the
> > > > > hill slightly high on the ground."
> > > > >
> > > > > One website about squat says "flat foot".
> > > >
> > > > It depends.
> > > >
> > > You forgot to give your 1$ to Lyle for that answer. ;)
> >
> > He's sent the collection agency after me...
>
>
> I pretty much just salute in the direction of Austin every once in a
> while. Is there some expiration period on coined phrases when they
> become public domain?

Dunno, but head the salute north now - Salt Lake City.

Lyle is trying to get multiple monkeys I think...

:^)

Actually skating there.

Keith Hobman
November 19th 04, 06:35 PM
In article <%[email protected]_s02>, "Lee Michaels"
> wrote:

> "bc" > wrote in message
> om...
> > (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
> >...
> > > In article >,
> > > (bc) wrote:
> > >
> > > > (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
> > > >...
> > > > > In article >,
> > > > > (wonderer) wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > > > Should I put 1 1/2 thick book on the hill or
> > > > > > flat foot?
> > > > > >
> > > > > > The book I have says "putting a book or wood stick that levels up
> the
> > > > > > hill slightly high on the ground."
> > > > > >
> > > > > > One website about squat says "flat foot".
> > > > >
> > > > > It depends.
> > > > >
> > > > > If you are trying to lift a maximal weight for powerlifting
> generally
> > > > > using a wide stance and keeping the knees back is more productive.
> > > > >
> > > > > If you are going ass-to-the-grass as in a weightlifting assistance
> > > > > exercise a heel is generally better as it leaves you lower back and
> pelvis
> > > > > in a better position.
> > > > >
> > > > > If neither is your goal than it really doesn't make that much
> difference.
> > > > > As well there are very good powerlifters who use a heel and very
> good
> > > > > weightlifters who lift in a flat shoe.
> > > >
> > > > Yeah, but 1-1/2 inches under the heel? I think it's probably better
> > > > for a beginner to just work on the flexibility and squat flat foot.
> > > > It scares me to think about that stick or book back there with heavy
> > > > weight on the bar and backing up over the stick, possibly tripping or
> > > > stumbling on it. Heels in the shoes are different, I realize.
> > >
> > > I dunno. If you can't get onto a board or plate without tripping I'm not
> > > sure you should be squatting...
> >
> > True. I still think the flexibility is worth striving for though,
> > especially for a newbie. Why confound the movement with boards and
> > stuff until you're sure you need it?
> >
> You over estimate some newbie's ability to do squats.
>
> I have had folks do free standing squats for three months before I let them
> touch a bar. I have had others use a rope or chain for awhile before they
> graduated to grabbing an upright with their hand. And from there they work
> up to free standing squats.
>
> Some folks couldn't do a squat if you paid them a million bucks. For those
> folks, an aid of some kind is not optional.
>
> It says something about our inactive lifestyles whn adults lose the ability
> that they all had as children.

Tommy Kono wrote an interesting chapter in his book where he claims heels
help get the pelvis positioned properly. So for some people it isn't a
matter of flexibility, but proper positioning. Its really hard to say,
"This is what everybody should do."

Mistress Krista
November 20th 04, 01:39 PM
"Lee Michaels" > wrote in message
news:%[email protected]_s02...
>
>
> You over estimate some newbie's ability to do squats.
>
> I have had folks do free standing squats for three months before I let
> them
> touch a bar. I have had others use a rope or chain for awhile before they
> graduated to grabbing an upright with their hand. And from there they work
> up to free standing squats.
>
> Some folks couldn't do a squat if you paid them a million bucks. For
> those
> folks, an aid of some kind is not optional.
>
> It says something about our inactive lifestyles whn adults lose the
> ability
> that they all had as children.
>


I find many folks can't do it at first because of balance issues or fear of
falling over. They get to a certain point and then panic and stop. I
usually have folks do it the first time while hanging on to a rail, to
eliminate the fear of getting stuck. It's amazing how much better their
squat gets right away, and just knowing that they CAN do it (or get close to
it) inspires them to work on getting it perfect.


Krista

--
http://www.stumptuous.com/weights.html
http://www.trans-health.com
mistresskrista at stumptuous dot com

bc
November 21st 04, 05:43 AM
(Keith Hobman) wrote in message >...
> In article >,
> (bc) wrote:
>
> > (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
> >...
> > > In article >,
> > > (billydee) wrote:
> > >
> > > > (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
> >...
> > > > > In article >,
> > > > > (wonderer) wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > > > Should I put 1 1/2 thick book on the hill or
> > > > > > flat foot?
> > > > > >
> > > > > > The book I have says "putting a book or wood stick that levels up the
> > > > > > hill slightly high on the ground."
> > > > > >
> > > > > > One website about squat says "flat foot".
> > > > >
> > > > > It depends.
> > > > >
> > > > You forgot to give your 1$ to Lyle for that answer. ;)
> > >
> > > He's sent the collection agency after me...
> >
> >
> > I pretty much just salute in the direction of Austin every once in a
> > while. Is there some expiration period on coined phrases when they
> > become public domain?
>
> Dunno, but head the salute north now - Salt Lake City.
>
> Lyle is trying to get multiple monkeys I think...
>
> :^)
>
> Actually skating there.

Salt Lake? Oh, well that's pretty much due West now. I'll just fart
that direction occasionally if I remember to.

- bc