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Larisa
November 18th 04, 07:34 PM
Hi all,

I have recently begun a fitness program - joined a gym and even had a
few sessions with a personal trainer. The trainer in question told me
that my hamstrings were tight (I knew that already, actually) and that
they needed to be stretched (which I was trying to do long before I'd
gotten to that gym), and that the best way of doing that was assisted
stretching (which I hadn't known). To make a long story short, I
think she overstretched something. The day after, I could barely
walk; and even a week afterwards, my hamstrings are still really sore
and can't stretch even as far as they used to be able to stretch. The
question is, what should I do to help the muscles recover? I've been
resting, and that helped - but should I be stretching them or not?
How long does it usually take to get back to normal? Should I be
doing other exercises while my hamstrings heal?

I'll be immensely grateful to all who reply.

LM

Keith Hobman
November 18th 04, 07:48 PM
In article >,
(Larisa) wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> I have recently begun a fitness program - joined a gym and even had a
> few sessions with a personal trainer. The trainer in question told me
> that my hamstrings were tight (I knew that already, actually) and that
> they needed to be stretched (which I was trying to do long before I'd
> gotten to that gym), and that the best way of doing that was assisted
> stretching (which I hadn't known). To make a long story short, I
> think she overstretched something. The day after, I could barely
> walk; and even a week afterwards, my hamstrings are still really sore
> and can't stretch even as far as they used to be able to stretch. The
> question is, what should I do to help the muscles recover? I've been
> resting, and that helped - but should I be stretching them or not?
> How long does it usually take to get back to normal? Should I be
> doing other exercises while my hamstrings heal?
>
> I'll be immensely grateful to all who reply.

Yeah.

Stretch lightly using dynamic stretches prior to exercise and passive
stretches after exercise. See

http://www.exrx.net/Muscles/Hamstrings.html

The good morning is a good dynamic stretch - use good form and relatively
light weight to start. The seated hamstring stretch is a good passive
stretch.

http://www.exrx.net/Stretches/Hamstrings/Seated.html

These can also be done standing.

Doing a PNF stretch isn't always a great idea if you are not in decent
shape. It sounds like you (or your trainer) way overdid the stretch. It
isn't necessarily the best way to stretch - every type has its place. It
can get the best results, but there is also more chance of injury.

BTW - most people who do the good morning and stiff-legged deadlift as a
hamstring stretch screw it up by not keeping their spinal column slightly
arched.

Lyle McDonald
November 18th 04, 08:17 PM
Keith Hobman wrote:

> Doing a PNF stretch isn't always a great idea if you are not in decent
> shape. It sounds like you (or your trainer) way overdid the stretch. It
> isn't necessarily the best way to stretch - every type has its place. It
> can get the best results, but there is also more chance of injury.

espcially if your partner is an idiot like the trainer being described
would appear to be. The person doing the PNF stretching has to pay
extremely good attention to the person they are stretching, both asking
for and listening to feedback to avoid exactly the kind of problem that
the OP described. Proper stretching shouldn't leave you very sore (if)
at all, much less for 7 days.

Lyle

Keith Hobman
November 18th 04, 08:42 PM
In article >, Lyle McDonald
> wrote:

> Keith Hobman wrote:
>
> > Doing a PNF stretch isn't always a great idea if you are not in decent
> > shape. It sounds like you (or your trainer) way overdid the stretch. It
> > isn't necessarily the best way to stretch - every type has its place. It
> > can get the best results, but there is also more chance of injury.
>
> espcially if your partner is an idiot like the trainer being described
> would appear to be. The person doing the PNF stretching has to pay
> extremely good attention to the person they are stretching, both asking
> for and listening to feedback to avoid exactly the kind of problem that
> the OP described. Proper stretching shouldn't leave you very sore (if)
> at all, much less for 7 days.

Agreed. I was going to call the trainer an idiot for using PNF stretches,
but as you say if you were watching the person closely they could be used
effectively.

But sore for a week - I'd ask for my money back or another free session.

Neil Gendzwill
November 18th 04, 09:13 PM
Keith Hobman wrote:

>
> But sore for a week - I'd ask for my money back or
> another free session.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Why, so she can get injured again?

Neil

Keith Hobman
November 18th 04, 09:16 PM
In article >, Neil Gendzwill
> wrote:

> Keith Hobman wrote:
>
> >
> > But sore for a week - I'd ask for my money back or
> > another free session.
> ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> Why, so she can get injured again?

Hmmmm....

I guess I was ASSuming the trainer wouldn't be a dork twice.

But you are correct. Money back.

:^)

spodosaurus
November 19th 04, 12:43 AM
Keith Hobman wrote:
> In article >,
> (Larisa) wrote:
>
>
>>Hi all,
>>
>>I have recently begun a fitness program - joined a gym and even had a
>>few sessions with a personal trainer. The trainer in question told me
>>that my hamstrings were tight (I knew that already, actually) and that
>>they needed to be stretched (which I was trying to do long before I'd
>>gotten to that gym), and that the best way of doing that was assisted
>>stretching (which I hadn't known). To make a long story short, I
>>think she overstretched something. The day after, I could barely
>>walk; and even a week afterwards, my hamstrings are still really sore
>>and can't stretch even as far as they used to be able to stretch. The
>>question is, what should I do to help the muscles recover? I've been
>>resting, and that helped - but should I be stretching them or not?
>>How long does it usually take to get back to normal? Should I be
>>doing other exercises while my hamstrings heal?
>>
>>I'll be immensely grateful to all who reply.
>
>
> Yeah.
>
> Stretch lightly using dynamic stretches prior to exercise and passive
> stretches after exercise. See
>
> http://www.exrx.net/Muscles/Hamstrings.html
>
> The good morning is a good dynamic stretch - use good form and relatively
> light weight to start. The seated hamstring stretch is a good passive
> stretch.
>
> http://www.exrx.net/Stretches/Hamstrings/Seated.html

Those can be really hard on the lower back. Even the form demonstrated
in that image is wrong (wayyy rounded lower back). I've been hurt twice
using that stretch.

> BTW - most people who do the good morning and stiff-legged deadlift as a
> hamstring stretch screw it up by not keeping their spinal column slightly
> arched.

That's the same mistake made in those hamstring stretching photos on exrx.

--
spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. To jump to the end
of the story, as a result of this I need a bone marrow transplant. Many
people around the world are waiting for a marrow transplant, too. Please
volunteer to be a marrow donor:
http://www.abmdr.org.au/
http://www.marrow.org/

Lyle McDonald
November 19th 04, 03:26 AM
Keith Hobman wrote:
> In article >, Lyle McDonald
> > wrote:
>
>
>>Keith Hobman wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Doing a PNF stretch isn't always a great idea if you are not in decent
>>>shape. It sounds like you (or your trainer) way overdid the stretch. It
>>>isn't necessarily the best way to stretch - every type has its place. It
>>>can get the best results, but there is also more chance of injury.
>>
>>espcially if your partner is an idiot like the trainer being described
>>would appear to be. The person doing the PNF stretching has to pay
>>extremely good attention to the person they are stretching, both asking
>>for and listening to feedback to avoid exactly the kind of problem that
>>the OP described. Proper stretching shouldn't leave you very sore (if)
>>at all, much less for 7 days.
>
>
> Agreed. I was going to call the trainer an idiot for using PNF stretches,
> but as you say if you were watching the person closely they could be used
> effectively.

Yeah, I seem to recall that I'd occasionally use it with new clients but
always very non-agressively and it was usually more to establish my
omniscience (I'd tell them I was going to show them a 'magic trick' and
then PNF their hamstrings and they'd ooh and aah at how much flexibilty
they'd gain) becuase it led to less argumentativeness from them down the
road.

But non-agressive use is the key to it. Dude must have cranked on her
seriously to cause that much DOMS for that long. Or strained it if it's
still sore a week later.

Lyle

bc
November 19th 04, 05:08 PM
spodosaurus > wrote in message >...
> Keith Hobman wrote:
> > In article >,
> > (Larisa) wrote:
> >
> >
> >>Hi all,
> >>
> >>I have recently begun a fitness program - joined a gym and even had a
> >>few sessions with a personal trainer. The trainer in question told me
> >>that my hamstrings were tight (I knew that already, actually) and that
> >>they needed to be stretched (which I was trying to do long before I'd
> >>gotten to that gym), and that the best way of doing that was assisted
> >>stretching (which I hadn't known). To make a long story short, I
> >>think she overstretched something. The day after, I could barely
> >>walk; and even a week afterwards, my hamstrings are still really sore
> >>and can't stretch even as far as they used to be able to stretch. The
> >>question is, what should I do to help the muscles recover? I've been
> >>resting, and that helped - but should I be stretching them or not?
> >>How long does it usually take to get back to normal? Should I be
> >>doing other exercises while my hamstrings heal?
> >>
> >>I'll be immensely grateful to all who reply.
> >
> >
> > Yeah.
> >
> > Stretch lightly using dynamic stretches prior to exercise and passive
> > stretches after exercise. See
> >
> > http://www.exrx.net/Muscles/Hamstrings.html
> >
> > The good morning is a good dynamic stretch - use good form and relatively
> > light weight to start. The seated hamstring stretch is a good passive
> > stretch.
> >
> > http://www.exrx.net/Stretches/Hamstrings/Seated.html
>
> Those can be really hard on the lower back. Even the form demonstrated
> in that image is wrong (wayyy rounded lower back). I've been hurt twice
> using that stretch.
>
> > BTW - most people who do the good morning and stiff-legged deadlift as a
> > hamstring stretch screw it up by not keeping their spinal column slightly
> > arched.
>
> That's the same mistake made in those hamstring stretching photos on exrx.

Yup, totally agree with Spodosaurus. Those hamstring stretches should
be done with a well supported lower back. In TKD oh so many years
ago, it was a big deal to keep your back arched and keep your eyes
looking forward, not down, while doing all those seated hamstring and
hip stretches. It takes patience, because the distance your hands
move is limited, but the feeling you should be looking for is in the
hamstring tightness, not how far you're grabbing forward.

- bc

Larisa
November 19th 04, 09:42 PM
Lyle McDonald > wrote in message >...
> Keith Hobman wrote:
> > In article >, Lyle McDonald
> > > wrote:
> >
> >
> >>Keith Hobman wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>>Doing a PNF stretch isn't always a great idea if you are not in decent
> >>>shape. It sounds like you (or your trainer) way overdid the stretch. It
> >>>isn't necessarily the best way to stretch - every type has its place. It
> >>>can get the best results, but there is also more chance of injury.
> >>
> >>espcially if your partner is an idiot like the trainer being described
> >>would appear to be. The person doing the PNF stretching has to pay
> >>extremely good attention to the person they are stretching, both asking
> >>for and listening to feedback to avoid exactly the kind of problem that
> >>the OP described. Proper stretching shouldn't leave you very sore (if)
> >>at all, much less for 7 days.
> >
> >
> > Agreed. I was going to call the trainer an idiot for using PNF stretches,
> > but as you say if you were watching the person closely they could be used
> > effectively.
>
> Yeah, I seem to recall that I'd occasionally use it with new clients but
> always very non-agressively and it was usually more to establish my
> omniscience (I'd tell them I was going to show them a 'magic trick' and
> then PNF their hamstrings and they'd ooh and aah at how much flexibilty
> they'd gain) becuase it led to less argumentativeness from them down the
> road.
>
> But non-agressive use is the key to it. Dude must have cranked on her
> seriously to cause that much DOMS for that long. Or strained it if it's
> still sore a week later.

I'm starting to conclude it's a strain - since I'm still shuffling
around like a 90-year-old, 10 days later. (well, two strains - she'd
managed to screw up both my hamstrings). The thing is, it really
didn't hurt at the time she did it - I would have stopped her if it
did, since I'd had sciatica before and tend to be cautious about
hamstring stretches for that reason.

So what does one do for a strain (aside from nothing at all, which is
what I've been doing)? Do I stretch it gently, leave it alone,
massage it, or what?

LM (grrr... just when I'd decided to get in shape...)

Lyle McDonald
November 19th 04, 09:56 PM
Larisa wrote:
> Lyle McDonald > wrote in message >...
>
>>Keith Hobman wrote:
>>
>>>In article >, Lyle McDonald
> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>Keith Hobman wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Doing a PNF stretch isn't always a great idea if you are not in decent
>>>>>shape. It sounds like you (or your trainer) way overdid the stretch. It
>>>>>isn't necessarily the best way to stretch - every type has its place. It
>>>>>can get the best results, but there is also more chance of injury.
>>>>
>>>>espcially if your partner is an idiot like the trainer being described
>>>>would appear to be. The person doing the PNF stretching has to pay
>>>>extremely good attention to the person they are stretching, both asking
>>>>for and listening to feedback to avoid exactly the kind of problem that
>>>>the OP described. Proper stretching shouldn't leave you very sore (if)
>>>>at all, much less for 7 days.
>>>
>>>
>>>Agreed. I was going to call the trainer an idiot for using PNF stretches,
>>>but as you say if you were watching the person closely they could be used
>>>effectively.
>>
>>Yeah, I seem to recall that I'd occasionally use it with new clients but
>>always very non-agressively and it was usually more to establish my
>>omniscience (I'd tell them I was going to show them a 'magic trick' and
>>then PNF their hamstrings and they'd ooh and aah at how much flexibilty
>>they'd gain) becuase it led to less argumentativeness from them down the
>>road.
>>
>>But non-agressive use is the key to it. Dude must have cranked on her
>>seriously to cause that much DOMS for that long. Or strained it if it's
>>still sore a week later.
>
>
> I'm starting to conclude it's a strain - since I'm still shuffling
> around like a 90-year-old, 10 days later. (well, two strains - she'd
> managed to screw up both my hamstrings). The thing is, it really
> didn't hurt at the time she did it - I would have stopped her if it
> did, since I'd had sciatica before and tend to be cautious about
> hamstring stretches for that reason.
>
> So what does one do for a strain (aside from nothing at all, which is
> what I've been doing)? Do I stretch it gently, leave it alone,
> massage it, or what?

Once you're past the acute stage of inflammation (first few days), I've
generally found that some very light activity and stretching can be helpful.

To whit: I had a slight hamstring strain a couple of weeks ago. Along
with light stretching, I did some high rep leg curls (light sets of
12-15) to just pump some blood through the area along with some lighter
cardio (same reason) along with light stretching. If it weren't so damn
cold, I've have gone to the hot tub at the pool, as it was, I was
relegated to soaking in the bath for heat.

Healed it right up.

Keith is right, tho, you should get your money back from this idiot
trainer who injured you. Or at least let her know what she did.

Lyle

Keith Hobman
November 19th 04, 09:58 PM
In article >,
(Larisa) wrote:

> Lyle McDonald > wrote in message
>...
> > Keith Hobman wrote:
> > > In article >, Lyle McDonald
> > > > wrote:
> > >
> > >
> > >>Keith Hobman wrote:
> > >>
> > >>
> > >>>Doing a PNF stretch isn't always a great idea if you are not in decent
> > >>>shape. It sounds like you (or your trainer) way overdid the stretch. It
> > >>>isn't necessarily the best way to stretch - every type has its place. It
> > >>>can get the best results, but there is also more chance of injury.
> > >>
> > >>espcially if your partner is an idiot like the trainer being described
> > >>would appear to be. The person doing the PNF stretching has to pay
> > >>extremely good attention to the person they are stretching, both asking
> > >>for and listening to feedback to avoid exactly the kind of problem that
> > >>the OP described. Proper stretching shouldn't leave you very sore (if)
> > >>at all, much less for 7 days.
> > >
> > >
> > > Agreed. I was going to call the trainer an idiot for using PNF stretches,
> > > but as you say if you were watching the person closely they could be used
> > > effectively.
> >
> > Yeah, I seem to recall that I'd occasionally use it with new clients but
> > always very non-agressively and it was usually more to establish my
> > omniscience (I'd tell them I was going to show them a 'magic trick' and
> > then PNF their hamstrings and they'd ooh and aah at how much flexibilty
> > they'd gain) becuase it led to less argumentativeness from them down the
> > road.
> >
> > But non-agressive use is the key to it. Dude must have cranked on her
> > seriously to cause that much DOMS for that long. Or strained it if it's
> > still sore a week later.
>
> I'm starting to conclude it's a strain - since I'm still shuffling
> around like a 90-year-old, 10 days later. (well, two strains - she'd
> managed to screw up both my hamstrings). The thing is, it really
> didn't hurt at the time she did it - I would have stopped her if it
> did, since I'd had sciatica before and tend to be cautious about
> hamstring stretches for that reason.
>
> So what does one do for a strain (aside from nothing at all, which is
> what I've been doing)? Do I stretch it gently, leave it alone,
> massage it, or what?
>
> LM (grrr... just when I'd decided to get in shape...)

You exercise it lightly. Massage is fine. Light stretching is fine.
Whatever works. Just keep it light and easy.

And I don't understand what hamstring stretches have to do with sciatica?
I assume you must have been using very poor form. Done properly a
hamstring stretch should not cause distress in the lower back. You _don't_
want to round your back when you are stretching your hamstrings. I don't
understand why people seem to think the point of a hamstring stretch is
too see how close you can get your face to the floor! The point is to
stretch the hamstring.

Keith Hobman
November 19th 04, 10:27 PM
In article >, wrote:

> On Fri, 19 Nov 2004 15:58:59 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
> wrote:
>
> >And I don't understand what hamstring stretches have to do with sciatica?
>
> Sciatica is often diagnosed by doing what is called a straight leg
> raise which does stretch the hamstring. The test is done by having the
> patient lie on his/her back while examiner lifts one leg straight up.
> A positive test (reproducing pain characteristically in the buttock
> radiating down back of leg) suggests sciatica.

Didn't know that. Thanks!

Lyle McDonald
November 19th 04, 11:33 PM
Keith Hobman wrote:

> In article >,
> (Larisa) wrote:
>
>
>>Lyle McDonald > wrote in message
>
> >...
>
>>>Keith Hobman wrote:
>>>
>>>>In article >, Lyle McDonald
> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Keith Hobman wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>Doing a PNF stretch isn't always a great idea if you are not in decent
>>>>>>shape. It sounds like you (or your trainer) way overdid the stretch. It
>>>>>>isn't necessarily the best way to stretch - every type has its place. It
>>>>>>can get the best results, but there is also more chance of injury.
>>>>>
>>>>>espcially if your partner is an idiot like the trainer being described
>>>>>would appear to be. The person doing the PNF stretching has to pay
>>>>>extremely good attention to the person they are stretching, both asking
>>>>>for and listening to feedback to avoid exactly the kind of problem that
>>>>>the OP described. Proper stretching shouldn't leave you very sore (if)
>>>>>at all, much less for 7 days.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>Agreed. I was going to call the trainer an idiot for using PNF stretches,
>>>>but as you say if you were watching the person closely they could be used
>>>>effectively.
>>>
>>>Yeah, I seem to recall that I'd occasionally use it with new clients but
>>>always very non-agressively and it was usually more to establish my
>>>omniscience (I'd tell them I was going to show them a 'magic trick' and
>>>then PNF their hamstrings and they'd ooh and aah at how much flexibilty
>>>they'd gain) becuase it led to less argumentativeness from them down the
>>>road.
>>>
>>>But non-agressive use is the key to it. Dude must have cranked on her
>>>seriously to cause that much DOMS for that long. Or strained it if it's
>>>still sore a week later.
>>
>>I'm starting to conclude it's a strain - since I'm still shuffling
>>around like a 90-year-old, 10 days later. (well, two strains - she'd
>>managed to screw up both my hamstrings). The thing is, it really
>>didn't hurt at the time she did it - I would have stopped her if it
>>did, since I'd had sciatica before and tend to be cautious about
>>hamstring stretches for that reason.
>>
>>So what does one do for a strain (aside from nothing at all, which is
>>what I've been doing)? Do I stretch it gently, leave it alone,
>>massage it, or what?
>>
>>LM (grrr... just when I'd decided to get in shape...)
>
>
> You exercise it lightly. Massage is fine. Light stretching is fine.
> Whatever works. Just keep it light and easy.
>
> And I don't understand what hamstring stretches have to do with sciatica?
> I assume you must have been using very poor form. Done properly a
> hamstring stretch should not cause distress in the lower back. You _don't_
> want to round your back when you are stretching your hamstrings. I don't
> understand why people seem to think the point of a hamstring stretch is
> too see how close you can get your face to the floor!

Because that's how most sources demonstrate a hamstring stretch. Most
fitness groups 'test' hamstring flexibility with the sit and reach and
all people ended up doing was horribly arounding their lower back, which
doens't test hamstring flexibility in the first place.

And, apparently ExRx (which I am more and more concluding has more bad
information than good, some of the form they demonstrate is completely
atrocious) is doing it too.

> The point is to
> stretch the hamstring.

No, the point is to reach a level of combined hamstring/low back
flexibility that you can perform auto-fellatio/cunnilingus and remove
any need for the opposite sex.

Lyle

Keith Hobman
November 19th 04, 11:48 PM
In article >, Lyle McDonald
> wrote:

> Keith Hobman wrote:
>
> > In article >,
> > (Larisa) wrote:
> >
> >
> >>Lyle McDonald > wrote in message
> >
> > >...
> >
> >>>Keith Hobman wrote:
> >>>
> >>>>In article >, Lyle McDonald
> > wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>>Keith Hobman wrote:
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>>Doing a PNF stretch isn't always a great idea if you are not in decent
> >>>>>>shape. It sounds like you (or your trainer) way overdid the stretch. It
> >>>>>>isn't necessarily the best way to stretch - every type has its place. It
> >>>>>>can get the best results, but there is also more chance of injury.
> >>>>>
> >>>>>espcially if your partner is an idiot like the trainer being described
> >>>>>would appear to be. The person doing the PNF stretching has to pay
> >>>>>extremely good attention to the person they are stretching, both asking
> >>>>>for and listening to feedback to avoid exactly the kind of problem that
> >>>>>the OP described. Proper stretching shouldn't leave you very sore (if)
> >>>>>at all, much less for 7 days.
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>Agreed. I was going to call the trainer an idiot for using PNF stretches,
> >>>>but as you say if you were watching the person closely they could be used
> >>>>effectively.
> >>>
> >>>Yeah, I seem to recall that I'd occasionally use it with new clients but
> >>>always very non-agressively and it was usually more to establish my
> >>>omniscience (I'd tell them I was going to show them a 'magic trick' and
> >>>then PNF their hamstrings and they'd ooh and aah at how much flexibilty
> >>>they'd gain) becuase it led to less argumentativeness from them down the
> >>>road.
> >>>
> >>>But non-agressive use is the key to it. Dude must have cranked on her
> >>>seriously to cause that much DOMS for that long. Or strained it if it's
> >>>still sore a week later.
> >>
> >>I'm starting to conclude it's a strain - since I'm still shuffling
> >>around like a 90-year-old, 10 days later. (well, two strains - she'd
> >>managed to screw up both my hamstrings). The thing is, it really
> >>didn't hurt at the time she did it - I would have stopped her if it
> >>did, since I'd had sciatica before and tend to be cautious about
> >>hamstring stretches for that reason.
> >>
> >>So what does one do for a strain (aside from nothing at all, which is
> >>what I've been doing)? Do I stretch it gently, leave it alone,
> >>massage it, or what?
> >>
> >>LM (grrr... just when I'd decided to get in shape...)
> >
> >
> > You exercise it lightly. Massage is fine. Light stretching is fine.
> > Whatever works. Just keep it light and easy.
> >
> > And I don't understand what hamstring stretches have to do with sciatica?
> > I assume you must have been using very poor form. Done properly a
> > hamstring stretch should not cause distress in the lower back. You _don't_
> > want to round your back when you are stretching your hamstrings. I don't
> > understand why people seem to think the point of a hamstring stretch is
> > too see how close you can get your face to the floor!
>
> Because that's how most sources demonstrate a hamstring stretch. Most
> fitness groups 'test' hamstring flexibility with the sit and reach and
> all people ended up doing was horribly arounding their lower back, which
> doens't test hamstring flexibility in the first place.
>
> And, apparently ExRx (which I am more and more concluding has more bad
> information than good, some of the form they demonstrate is completely
> atrocious) is doing it too.
>
> > The point is to
> > stretch the hamstring.
>
> No, the point is to reach a level of combined hamstring/low back
> flexibility that you can perform auto-fellatio/cunnilingus and remove
> any need for the opposite sex.

Why do you need flexibility to do that?

:^?

Larisa
November 22nd 04, 06:10 AM
(Keith Hobman) wrote in message

> You exercise it lightly. Massage is fine. Light stretching is fine.
> Whatever works. Just keep it light and easy.
>
> And I don't understand what hamstring stretches have to do with sciatica?
> I assume you must have been using very poor form. Done properly a
> hamstring stretch should not cause distress in the lower back. You _don't_
> want to round your back when you are stretching your hamstrings. I don't
> understand why people seem to think the point of a hamstring stretch is
> too see how close you can get your face to the floor! The point is to
> stretch the hamstring.

Oh, sorry - I must not have made myself sufficiently clear. The
sciatica was a long time ago; I'm not sure how I got it, but it was
unrelated to the hamstring stretching. I've mostly gotten over it,
but I tend to be very careful about stretching the hamstrings because
I'm afraid of irritating the sciatic nerve again.

And thanks for the advice; I've been doing very light exercise, and
mild yoga stretches, and they seem to help.

LM

Keith Hobman
November 22nd 04, 06:06 PM
In article >,
(Larisa) wrote:

> (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
>
> > You exercise it lightly. Massage is fine. Light stretching is fine.
> > Whatever works. Just keep it light and easy.
> >
> > And I don't understand what hamstring stretches have to do with sciatica?
> > I assume you must have been using very poor form. Done properly a
> > hamstring stretch should not cause distress in the lower back. You _don't_
> > want to round your back when you are stretching your hamstrings. I don't
> > understand why people seem to think the point of a hamstring stretch is
> > too see how close you can get your face to the floor! The point is to
> > stretch the hamstring.
>
> Oh, sorry - I must not have made myself sufficiently clear. The
> sciatica was a long time ago; I'm not sure how I got it, but it was
> unrelated to the hamstring stretching. I've mostly gotten over it,
> but I tend to be very careful about stretching the hamstrings because
> I'm afraid of irritating the sciatic nerve again.
>
> And thanks for the advice; I've been doing very light exercise, and
> mild yoga stretches, and they seem to help.

I wasn't aware they used hamstring stretches as a diagnostic tool for
sciatica, so I assume you are correct to be wary because of the pain
factor.