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Jogenn Blake
November 21st 04, 07:01 AM
I am just learning to squat and have been using Stuart McRoberts
handbook on weight training technique for instruction.
There he says that you shouldn't deep squat if your lower back rounds
out when you do so.
In fact my lower back does round out, so I have been squatting to
parallel which is OK.
However, I am attracted to the idea of doing deep squats, and want if
I can to solve this problem of the lower back rounding at the bottom.
It helps a little bit if I stick my butt out before descent and sit
into the squat, and try and keep my butt back throughout as much as
possible.
However, at the bottom my back still rounds out.
My flexibility is reasonable. I can touch my toes, with a very slight
bend in my hamstrings and my calves are very flexible.

Thanks

Lyle McDonald
November 21st 04, 05:32 PM
Jogenn Blake wrote:
> I am just learning to squat and have been using Stuart McRoberts
> handbook on weight training technique for instruction.
> There he says that you shouldn't deep squat if your lower back rounds
> out when you do so.
> In fact my lower back does round out, so I have been squatting to
> parallel which is OK.
> However, I am attracted to the idea of doing deep squats, and want if
> I can to solve this problem of the lower back rounding at the bottom.
> It helps a little bit if I stick my butt out before descent and sit
> into the squat, and try and keep my butt back throughout as much as
> possible.
> However, at the bottom my back still rounds out.
> My flexibility is reasonable. I can touch my toes, with a very slight
> bend in my hamstrings and my calves are very flexible.

If you are using a lot of low back round (or have long monkey arms),
touching your toes means nothing.

You need to improve glute and hamstring flexibility. Prior to
squatting, you should stretch both.

During your warmup sets, you should do what most call a squat stretch.
Load the bar with a light weight and lower as deep as you can go while
keeping your back flat/slightly arched. Now try to sink a bit deeper
while keeping the same low back position and hold it. This will stretch
all of the relevant muscles/tissues involved in deep squatting. with
time and patience, you can probably get past parallel with a flat back.

Lyle

Steve Freides
November 21st 04, 11:37 PM
"Jogenn Blake" > wrote in message
om...
>I am just learning to squat and have been using Stuart McRoberts
> handbook on weight training technique for instruction.
> There he says that you shouldn't deep squat if your lower back rounds
> out when you do so.
> In fact my lower back does round out, so I have been squatting to
> parallel which is OK.
> However, I am attracted to the idea of doing deep squats, and want if
> I can to solve this problem of the lower back rounding at the bottom.
> It helps a little bit if I stick my butt out before descent and sit
> into the squat, and try and keep my butt back throughout as much as
> possible.
> However, at the bottom my back still rounds out.
> My flexibility is reasonable. I can touch my toes, with a very slight
> bend in my hamstrings and my calves are very flexible.

I can put my palms on the ground with my knees locked and I still don't
have as much flexibility as I'd like when it comes to squatting deep.
Keep working on hamstring flexibility. Calf flexibility doesn't really
enter into this, particularly if you push your butt back because your
shins shouldn't move much at all.

The idea of pushing your butt back is, based on my admittedly little
experience squatting, correct. I know it helps me.

I prefer good mornings for hamstring stretching, done PNF style. Stand
up, lock the lower back, and push the butt back. Go only as far as you
can while keep the torso and the hips locked together, hold in that
position while tensing, then relax and try to "fall" an inch further.
Break at the knees and stand back up. With a bit of practice, you can
work two or three of these before coming up, each time retensing from
your newly-lowered position, holding, then falling another inch or so.
Personally, I prefer not using PNF stretching before lifting, instead
just locking the back and actively pulling/pushing as far down/over as I
can before squatting, and saving the PNF version for the end of the day.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com