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View Full Version : how much fat does lactose produce?


pil
November 22nd 04, 07:04 PM
The whey powder I am currently using contains about 17% protein and 70%
lactose. This is industrial grade whey that is a waste product in the dairy
industry. How much fat will all this lactose produce? I don't have the
budget to go and buy isolated protein powders. I am concerned that this
lactose will be turned into fat

Lyle McDonald
November 22nd 04, 07:17 PM
pil wrote:
> The whey powder I am currently using contains about 17% protein and 70%
> lactose. This is industrial grade whey that is a waste product in the dairy
> industry. How much fat will all this lactose produce? I don't have the
> budget to go and buy isolated protein powders. I am concerned that this
> lactose will be turned into fat
>
>

Why?

Lyle

Proton Soup
November 22nd 04, 07:43 PM
On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 21:04:29 +0200, "pil" > wrote:

>The whey powder I am currently using contains about 17% protein and 70%
>lactose. This is industrial grade whey that is a waste product in the dairy
>industry. How much fat will all this lactose produce? I don't have the
>budget to go and buy isolated protein powders. I am concerned that this
>lactose will be turned into fat

Unless it's just ridiculously cheap, why not just buy non-fat milk
powder. About $9 for the big box at WalMart.

-----------
Proton Soup

"Thanks for noticing that I didn't actually say anything." - Mike Lane

the tree by the river
November 22nd 04, 08:43 PM
In article >, pil > wrote:
>
>The whey powder I am currently using contains about 17% protein and 70%
>lactose. This is industrial grade whey that is a waste product in the dairy
>industry. How much fat will all this lactose produce? I don't have the
>budget to go and buy isolated protein powders. I am concerned that this
>lactose will be turned into fat

I don't know of any reason why lactose would be any more likely to turn
into fat than any other low-glycemic carbohydrate, but I don't know of
any reason why it would be less likely to either. Calories count.

How cheap is this indistrial whey? Out here in the US, I see whey
protein that's about 80% protein going for $6/pound in the stores, so in
terms of cost/gram of protein, the kind of whey you're talking about
would have to run significantly below $1.50/pound for it to make any
kind of sense as a protein supplement. I don't know how the economics
compare out there, but I'd be surprised if whey protein was all that
expensive.

--
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pil
November 22nd 04, 08:47 PM
isint there just as much lactose in the milk powder as there is in the whey
powder? I can get the whey powder for very cheap


"Proton Soup" > wrote in message
...
> On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 21:04:29 +0200, "pil" > wrote:
>
> >The whey powder I am currently using contains about 17% protein and 70%
> >lactose. This is industrial grade whey that is a waste product in the
dairy
> >industry. How much fat will all this lactose produce? I don't have the
> >budget to go and buy isolated protein powders. I am concerned that this
> >lactose will be turned into fat
>
> Unless it's just ridiculously cheap, why not just buy non-fat milk
> powder. About $9 for the big box at WalMart.
>
> -----------
> Proton Soup
>
> "Thanks for noticing that I didn't actually say anything." - Mike Lane

Watson Davis
November 22nd 04, 09:23 PM
"pil" > wrote in :

> The whey powder I am currently using contains about 17% protein and
> 70% lactose. This is industrial grade whey that is a waste product in
> the dairy industry. How much fat will all this lactose produce? I
> don't have the budget to go and buy isolated protein powders. I am
> concerned that this lactose will be turned into fat

You're asking the wrong question. It's not lactose that produces fat.

Watson (the pencil neck) Davis

Helgi Briem
November 23rd 04, 12:31 PM
On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 21:04:29 +0200, "pil" > wrote:

>The whey powder I am currently using contains about 17% protein and 70%
>lactose. This is industrial grade whey that is a waste product in the dairy
>industry. How much fat will all this lactose produce? I don't have the
>budget to go and buy isolated protein powders. I am concerned that this
>lactose will be turned into fat
>
Why should lactose turn to fat any more than the whey?

A calorie is a calorie.

Lactose, like all other carbohydrates, has 4 kcal/g.

--
Helgi Briem hbriem AT simnet DOT is

A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
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Peter Webb
November 23rd 04, 12:45 PM
"Helgi Briem" > wrote in message
...
> On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 21:04:29 +0200, "pil" > wrote:
>
>>The whey powder I am currently using contains about 17% protein and 70%
>>lactose. This is industrial grade whey that is a waste product in the
>>dairy
>>industry. How much fat will all this lactose produce? I don't have the
>>budget to go and buy isolated protein powders. I am concerned that this
>>lactose will be turned into fat
>>
> Why should lactose turn to fat any more than the whey?
>
> A calorie is a calorie.
>
> Lactose, like all other carbohydrates, has 4 kcal/g.
>

And fat has 9 kcal/g.

So eating 100 grams of your product will give you 17 grams of protein, and
the same calories from the lactose as 70 g * 4 /9 = 30 grams of fat.

17 grams isn't very much ... 200 grams will give you 34 g of protein, but
the same calories as 60 grams of fat.

This stuff has very little protein but tons of calories ... don't use it if
weight control is a problem.

Proton Soup
November 23rd 04, 02:55 PM
On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 22:47:45 +0200, "pil" > wrote:

>isint there just as much lactose in the milk powder as there is in the whey
>powder? I can get the whey powder for very cheap

What is your goal? Are you wanting the fast digestibility of whey, or
are you just looking for a convenient way to add more protein to your
diet? The nonfat milk I mentioned is about 40% protein, with the
remainder milk sugar. Milk protein from cows is mostly casein,
though, so it won't get your blood amino acid concentration up as
quickly as whey, but that's really not such a big deal unless you're
consuming it immediately post-workout.


>"Proton Soup" > wrote in message
...
>> On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 21:04:29 +0200, "pil" > wrote:
>>
>> >The whey powder I am currently using contains about 17% protein and 70%
>> >lactose. This is industrial grade whey that is a waste product in the
>dairy
>> >industry. How much fat will all this lactose produce? I don't have the
>> >budget to go and buy isolated protein powders. I am concerned that this
>> >lactose will be turned into fat
>>
>> Unless it's just ridiculously cheap, why not just buy non-fat milk
>> powder. About $9 for the big box at WalMart.
>>
>> -----------
>> Proton Soup
>>
>> "Thanks for noticing that I didn't actually say anything." - Mike Lane
>

-----------
Proton Soup

"Thanks for noticing that I didn't actually say anything." - Mike Lane

Bassem Kandil
November 23rd 04, 04:18 PM
Hi Pil,
you can buy lactose free protein powder,,there is different kind. they are
cheap in price ($50 for 5lb)

Bassem
Bodymax nutrition Inc
519-252-4315

"pil" > wrote in message
...
> The whey powder I am currently using contains about 17% protein and 70%
> lactose. This is industrial grade whey that is a waste product in the
dairy
> industry. How much fat will all this lactose produce? I don't have the
> budget to go and buy isolated protein powders. I am concerned that this
> lactose will be turned into fat
>
>

Blair P. Houghton
November 23rd 04, 07:59 PM
Proton Soup > wrote:
>On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 22:47:45 +0200, "pil" > wrote:
>
>>isint there just as much lactose in the milk powder as there is in the whey
>>powder? I can get the whey powder for very cheap
>
>What is your goal? Are you wanting the fast digestibility of whey, or
>are you just looking for a convenient way to add more protein to your
>diet? The nonfat milk I mentioned is about 40% protein, with the
>remainder milk sugar. Milk protein from cows is mostly casein,
>though, so it won't get your blood amino acid concentration up as
>quickly as whey, but that's really not such a big deal unless you're
>consuming it immediately post-workout.

Commercial casein-based powders taste like ****, too.

So here's the trick:

Mix your favorite whey powder with nonfat milk.

Instant protein hit from the whey, and the casein in the milk
is time-released until your next meal.

Plus the lactose brings some carbos to help that protein
get into your muscles.

As for the original question, anything you eat can produce
fat, minus a little energy to convert carbs or protein
to fat. You'll "get fat" if you're eating about 15% more
cals than you're expending in a day with no exercise;
if you're exercising and enough of your food is protein
and carbs (to get protein into muscle *requires* carbs),
you'll gain muscle, and a little fat. You can always diet
the new fat off later by lowering your total cals to 500-800
below your output and doing aerobics and maintenance-grade
resistance training.

The problem with that much lactose is it's a sugar, albeit
a complex one, but it will monkey your insulin levels and
there will be points after you eat where your body goes
into "food coma" and starts the fat-storing process.

Commercial whey supplement powders have lactose, but a lot
less than generic dairy-byproduct whey does.

--Blair
"Now go eat."

Blair P. Houghton
November 23rd 04, 08:03 PM
Helgi Briem > wrote:
>On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 21:04:29 +0200, "pil" > wrote:
>
>>The whey powder I am currently using contains about 17% protein and 70%
>>lactose. This is industrial grade whey that is a waste product in the dairy
>>industry. How much fat will all this lactose produce? I don't have the
>>budget to go and buy isolated protein powders. I am concerned that this
>>lactose will be turned into fat
>>
>Why should lactose turn to fat any more than the whey?
>
>A calorie is a calorie.

It takes a little energy to convert a carbo cal to a fat cal.
And a little more to digest it in the first place.
Same with protein.
Then it takes a little energy to convert a fat cal into a work cal.

Generally the whole-system efficiency rule of thumb is
that you will be able to exert 1 calorie of work for each
4 calories you eat.

>Lactose, like all other carbohydrates, has 4 kcal/g.

Well, they're all close to 4 kcal/g, but there are tiny
variations that are totally swamped by the other variations
in the way the system works.

But yeah.

If you imagine those 4 cals coming from every gram and becoming
0.44 grams of fat, you'll do alright on your diet.

--Blair
"Works for me."