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jaialai_technology
November 24th 04, 04:57 PM
Sometimes at night I feel a little restless while watrching tv or
reading and was thinking about maybe doing a few sets of bodyweight
excercises such as push-ups or crunches just for the heck of it. Maybe
seeing how many I can do in a commercial break or something. My question
is, is this a problem seeing as I lift 3-4 times a week? If I work my
chest at the gym and then do a bnch of push-ups later on am I opening
myself up for injury or hindering recovery?

frank
November 24th 04, 07:48 PM
both.

"jaialai_technology" > wrote in message
...
> Sometimes at night I feel a little restless while watrching tv or reading
> and was thinking about maybe doing a few sets of bodyweight excercises
> such as push-ups or crunches just for the heck of it. Maybe seeing how
> many I can do in a commercial break or something. My question is, is this
> a problem seeing as I lift 3-4 times a week? If I work my chest at the gym
> and then do a bnch of push-ups later on am I opening myself up for injury
> or hindering recovery?
>

Keith Hobman
November 24th 04, 07:53 PM
In article >, "frank"
> wrote:

> both.
>
> "jaialai_technology" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Sometimes at night I feel a little restless while watrching tv or reading
> > and was thinking about maybe doing a few sets of bodyweight excercises
> > such as push-ups or crunches just for the heck of it. Maybe seeing how
> > many I can do in a commercial break or something. My question is, is this
> > a problem seeing as I lift 3-4 times a week? If I work my chest at the gym
> > and then do a bnch of push-ups later on am I opening myself up for injury
> > or hindering recovery?
> >

Neither, as long as the intensity isn't too high.

Light exercise between workouts has been shown to improve restoration. And
there is nothing to suggest it will cause injury.

Per Elmsäter
November 24th 04, 08:09 PM
Keith Hobman wrote:
> In article >, "frank"
> > wrote:
>
>> both.
>>
>> "jaialai_technology" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> Sometimes at night I feel a little restless while watrching tv or
>>> reading and was thinking about maybe doing a few sets of bodyweight
>>> excercises such as push-ups or crunches just for the heck of it.
>>> Maybe seeing how many I can do in a commercial break or something.
>>> My question is, is this a problem seeing as I lift 3-4 times a
>>> week? If I work my chest at the gym and then do a bnch of push-ups
>>> later on am I opening myself up for injury or hindering recovery?
>>>
>
> Neither, as long as the intensity isn't too high.
>
> Light exercise between workouts has been shown to improve
> restoration. And there is nothing to suggest it will cause injury.

Elite cyclists always recover by doing active recovery rides, so why
shouldn't it work for other sports? Light resistance and lots of reps. Or in
cycling terms, high cadence and low gears.

--
Perre
I gave up on SPAM and redirected it to hotmail instead.

Per Elmsäter
November 25th 04, 05:54 PM
Bully wrote:
> Per Elmsäter wrote:
>> Keith Hobman wrote:
>>> In article >, "frank"
>>> > wrote:
>>>
>>>> both.
>>>>
>>>> "jaialai_technology" > wrote in message
>>>> ...
>>>>> Sometimes at night I feel a little restless while watrching tv or
>>>>> reading and was thinking about maybe doing a few sets of
>>>>> bodyweight excercises such as push-ups or crunches just for the
>>>>> heck of it. Maybe seeing how many I can do in a commercial break
>>>>> or something. My question is, is this a problem seeing as I lift
>>>>> 3-4 times a week? If I work my chest at the gym and then do a
>>>>> bnch of push-ups later on am I opening myself up for injury or
>>>>> hindering recovery?
>>>>>
>>>
>>> Neither, as long as the intensity isn't too high.
>>>
>>> Light exercise between workouts has been shown to improve
>>> restoration. And there is nothing to suggest it will cause injury.
>>
>> Elite cyclists always recover by doing active recovery rides, so why
>> shouldn't it work for other sports? Light resistance and lots of
>> reps. Or in cycling terms, high cadence and low gears.
>
> Spinning!

Spinning is a matter of definition. We often say that we get spun out in a
gear at for instance 120 rpm or higher. Which is lots higher cadence than an
active recovery. Active recovery would be more like 90-100 rpm at a low
resistance.
Or do you mean a spinning class. Well if you don't give a hoot about the
instructor and just spin along nicely on your own this will do the trick.


--
Perre
I gave up on SPAM and redirected it to hotmail instead.

jaialai_technology
November 29th 04, 02:28 AM
Per Elmsäter wrote:

> Bully wrote:
>
>>Per Elmsäter wrote:
>>
>>>Keith Hobman wrote:
>>>
>>>>In article >, "frank"
> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>both.
>>>>>
>>>>>"jaialai_technology" > wrote in message
...
>>>>>
>>>>>>Sometimes at night I feel a little restless while watrching tv or
>>>>>>reading and was thinking about maybe doing a few sets of
>>>>>>bodyweight excercises such as push-ups or crunches just for the
>>>>>>heck of it. Maybe seeing how many I can do in a commercial break
>>>>>>or something. My question is, is this a problem seeing as I lift
>>>>>>3-4 times a week? If I work my chest at the gym and then do a
>>>>>>bnch of push-ups later on am I opening myself up for injury or
>>>>>>hindering recovery?
>>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>Neither, as long as the intensity isn't too high.
>>>>
>>>>Light exercise between workouts has been shown to improve
>>>>restoration. And there is nothing to suggest it will cause injury.
>>>
>>>Elite cyclists always recover by doing active recovery rides, so why
>>>shouldn't it work for other sports? Light resistance and lots of
>>>reps. Or in cycling terms, high cadence and low gears.
>>
>>Spinning!
>
>
> Spinning is a matter of definition. We often say that we get spun out in a
> gear at for instance 120 rpm or higher. Which is lots higher cadence than an
> active recovery. Active recovery would be more like 90-100 rpm at a low
> resistance.
> Or do you mean a spinning class. Well if you don't give a hoot about the
> instructor and just spin along nicely on your own this will do the trick.

Interestingly, I have been doing spinning at the gym as a fun bit of
cardio to help burn some extra calories. More to the point of my
original question, I have been doing some sets of "Hindu Squats" as
popularized by the "Combat Conditioning" series. I saw them discussed on
that guy's website. They pretty much fit the bill as something to do
between commercials when I am reading or watching tv and feeling a
little restless. I worked legs the other day and, while hardly any sort
of scientific evidence, doing some "Hindu Squats" since then seems to
have helped recovery and not hinder it. Going by a data point of one is
pretty silly, of course. Then again, since it hasn't at all hurt me I
see no reason to stop.

Mr. Gantlet
December 5th 04, 10:10 PM
"jaialai_technology" > wrote in message
...
> Sometimes at night I feel a little restless while watrching tv or reading
> and was thinking about maybe doing a few sets of bodyweight excercises
> such as push-ups or crunches just for the heck of it. Maybe seeing how
> many I can do in a commercial break or something. My question is, is this
> a problem seeing as I lift 3-4 times a week? If I work my chest at the gym
> and then do a bnch of push-ups later on am I opening myself up for injury
> or hindering recovery?
>

I seen lots of people that work out in gyms that can easily do some more
pushups at home.
and there are those that work out hard enough at the gym that they shouldn't
do anything else
until their muscles rest and recover.
I think it depends on your age, how hard you work out at the gym, are you
eating right,
how much rest you give your muscles. beware not to over work out.

Tom
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