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Lampi
November 26th 04, 07:07 PM
I wanted to ask you something about some old programs you sent me.

lampi at powerlifting dot ca

Keith Hobman
November 26th 04, 07:20 PM
In article >, Lampi
> wrote:

> I wanted to ask you something about some old programs you sent me.
>
> lampi at powerlifting dot ca

Sent you an email, but it can be good to ask the questions on this forum
as well. It is always good to get other perspectives. I find there are a
number of people on this forum who may not be powerlifters, but can raise
important questions and get you thinking. Lyle. Elzi. Whit. And of course
the other powerlifters also have perspective - Will and John come
immediately to mind. And our 'mystery' raw guy who is hella strong. And
I'm missing a lot of other people.

Keith Hobman
November 27th 04, 05:58 PM
In article >, Usenet Posting
> wrote:

> On Fri, 26 Nov 2004 13:20:14 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
> wrote:
>
> >In article >, Lampi
> > wrote:
> >
> >> I wanted to ask you something about some old programs you sent me.
> >>
> >> lampi at powerlifting dot ca
> >
> >Sent you an email, but it can be good to ask the questions on this forum
> >as well. It is always good to get other perspectives. I find there are a
> >number of people on this forum who may not be powerlifters, but can raise
> >important questions and get you thinking. Lyle. Elzi. Whit. And of course
> >the other powerlifters also have perspective - Will and John come
> >immediately to mind. And our 'mystery' raw guy who is hella strong. And
> >I'm missing a lot of other people.
>
> me. Duh.

Well. I can count on a dissenting opinion on the need to lift heavy
things, right?

I do tend to agree testing 1RM is unnecessary for most people. But heavy
training can be done without 1RM.

John Hanson
November 27th 04, 09:41 PM
On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 21:31:20 GMT, Usenet Posting
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

>On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 11:58:24 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
>wrote:
>
>>In article >, Usenet Posting
> wrote:
>>
>>> On Fri, 26 Nov 2004 13:20:14 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>> >In article >, Lampi
>>> > wrote:
>>> >
>>> >> I wanted to ask you something about some old programs you sent me.
>>> >>
>>> >> lampi at powerlifting dot ca
>>> >
>>> >Sent you an email, but it can be good to ask the questions on this forum
>>> >as well. It is always good to get other perspectives. I find there are a
>>> >number of people on this forum who may not be powerlifters, but can raise
>>> >important questions and get you thinking. Lyle. Elzi. Whit. And of course
>>> >the other powerlifters also have perspective - Will and John come
>>> >immediately to mind. And our 'mystery' raw guy who is hella strong. And
>>> >I'm missing a lot of other people.
>>>
>>> me. Duh.
>>
>>Well. I can count on a dissenting opinion on the need to lift heavy
>>things, right?
>>
>
>Hee, yes.
>
>>I do tend to agree testing 1RM is unnecessary for most people. But heavy
>>training can be done without 1RM.
>
>But why? My question has always been why take the risk? When does
>the risk/reward ratio get so far out of whack that it is a form of
>insane behavior. Up to a point I think there are enormous benefits in
>terms of physical and mental well-being that FAR outweigh the risk of
>injury. But I see people here posting over and over about every
>little increment and you just have to wait and eventually, one by one,
>they all end up with some cripplingly bad injury.
>
>Personally I'll cycle up and down to about 275 on my deadlift and back
>down to 225. When I get up to that 275 level I could keep going but I
>find that the risk/reward calculus goes completely out of whack. In
>the people who push past that, with all due respect, I think they have
>a problem. This is especially, perhaps exclusively, applied to people
>who do this purely out of some "battle against themselves". In fact
>that is the argument I'll hear most often when I go on my periodic
>tirade on this subject.

I hope you are using kilos.

Keith Hobman
November 27th 04, 09:42 PM
In article >, Usenet Posting
> wrote:

> On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 11:58:24 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
> wrote:
>
> >In article >, Usenet Posting
> > wrote:
> >
> >> On Fri, 26 Nov 2004 13:20:14 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
> >> wrote:
> >>
> >> >In article >, Lampi
> >> > wrote:
> >> >
> >> >> I wanted to ask you something about some old programs you sent me.
> >> >>
> >> >> lampi at powerlifting dot ca
> >> >
> >> >Sent you an email, but it can be good to ask the questions on this forum
> >> >as well. It is always good to get other perspectives. I find there are a
> >> >number of people on this forum who may not be powerlifters, but can raise
> >> >important questions and get you thinking. Lyle. Elzi. Whit. And of course
> >> >the other powerlifters also have perspective - Will and John come
> >> >immediately to mind. And our 'mystery' raw guy who is hella strong. And
> >> >I'm missing a lot of other people.
> >>
> >> me. Duh.
> >
> >Well. I can count on a dissenting opinion on the need to lift heavy
> >things, right?
> >
>
> Hee, yes.
>
> >I do tend to agree testing 1RM is unnecessary for most people. But heavy
> >training can be done without 1RM.
>
> But why? My question has always been why take the risk? When does
> the risk/reward ratio get so far out of whack that it is a form of
> insane behavior. Up to a point I think there are enormous benefits in
> terms of physical and mental well-being that FAR outweigh the risk of
> injury. But I see people here posting over and over about every
> little increment and you just have to wait and eventually, one by one,
> they all end up with some cripplingly bad injury.
>
> Personally I'll cycle up and down to about 275 on my deadlift and back
> down to 225. When I get up to that 275 level I could keep going but I
> find that the risk/reward calculus goes completely out of whack. In
> the people who push past that, with all due respect, I think they have
> a problem. This is especially, perhaps exclusively, applied to people
> who do this purely out of some "battle against themselves". In fact
> that is the argument I'll hear most often when I go on my periodic
> tirade on this subject.

Where is the evidence of the 'risk'? Powerlifting has very small risk
associated with it. olympic lifting is even smaller.

Idie
November 28th 04, 04:18 AM
Usenet Posting > wrote in message
...
> On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 11:58:24 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
> wrote:
>
> >In article >, Usenet Posting
> > wrote:
> >
> >> On Fri, 26 Nov 2004 13:20:14 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
> >> wrote:
> >>
> >> >In article >, Lampi
> >> > wrote:
> >> >
> >> >> I wanted to ask you something about some old programs you sent me.
> >> >>
> >> >> lampi at powerlifting dot ca
> >> >
> >> >Sent you an email, but it can be good to ask the questions on this
forum
> >> >as well. It is always good to get other perspectives. I find there are
a
> >> >number of people on this forum who may not be powerlifters, but can
raise
> >> >important questions and get you thinking. Lyle. Elzi. Whit. And of
course
> >> >the other powerlifters also have perspective - Will and John come
> >> >immediately to mind. And our 'mystery' raw guy who is hella strong.
And
> >> >I'm missing a lot of other people.
> >>
> >> me. Duh.
> >
> >Well. I can count on a dissenting opinion on the need to lift heavy
> >things, right?
> >
>
> Hee, yes.
>
> >I do tend to agree testing 1RM is unnecessary for most people. But heavy
> >training can be done without 1RM.
>
> But why? My question has always been why take the risk? When does
> the risk/reward ratio get so far out of whack that it is a form of
> insane behavior. Up to a point I think there are enormous benefits in
> terms of physical and mental well-being that FAR outweigh the risk of
> injury. But I see people here posting over and over about every
> little increment and you just have to wait and eventually, one by one,
> they all end up with some cripplingly bad injury.
>
> Personally I'll cycle up and down to about 275 on my deadlift and back
> down to 225. When I get up to that 275 level I could keep going but I
> find that the risk/reward calculus goes completely out of whack. In
> the people who push past that, with all due respect, I think they have
> a problem. This is especially, perhaps exclusively, applied to people
> who do this purely out of some "battle against themselves". In fact
> that is the argument I'll hear most often when I go on my periodic
> tirade on this subject.

spoken like a true pussy

no offense, mike. :)

whit

>
>
> --
> The pain is pretty overwhelming, prolly
> comparable only to childbirth or kidney stones.
> --Brian L.

Proton Soup
November 28th 04, 05:38 AM
On Sun, 28 Nov 2004 05:04:25 GMT, Usenet Posting
> wrote:

>On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 15:42:00 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
>wrote:
>
>>In article >, Usenet Posting
> wrote:
>>
>>> On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 11:58:24 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>> >In article >, Usenet Posting
>>> > wrote:
>>> >
>>> >> On Fri, 26 Nov 2004 13:20:14 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
>>> >> wrote:
>>> >>
>>> >> >In article >, Lampi
>>> >> > wrote:
>>> >> >
>>> >> >> I wanted to ask you something about some old programs you sent me.
>>> >> >>
>>> >> >> lampi at powerlifting dot ca
>>> >> >
>>> >> >Sent you an email, but it can be good to ask the questions on this forum
>>> >> >as well. It is always good to get other perspectives. I find there are a
>>> >> >number of people on this forum who may not be powerlifters, but can raise
>>> >> >important questions and get you thinking. Lyle. Elzi. Whit. And of course
>>> >> >the other powerlifters also have perspective - Will and John come
>>> >> >immediately to mind. And our 'mystery' raw guy who is hella strong. And
>>> >> >I'm missing a lot of other people.
>>> >>
>>> >> me. Duh.
>>> >
>>> >Well. I can count on a dissenting opinion on the need to lift heavy
>>> >things, right?
>>> >
>>>
>>> Hee, yes.
>>>
>>> >I do tend to agree testing 1RM is unnecessary for most people. But heavy
>>> >training can be done without 1RM.
>>>
>>> But why? My question has always been why take the risk? When does
>>> the risk/reward ratio get so far out of whack that it is a form of
>>> insane behavior. Up to a point I think there are enormous benefits in
>>> terms of physical and mental well-being that FAR outweigh the risk of
>>> injury. But I see people here posting over and over about every
>>> little increment and you just have to wait and eventually, one by one,
>>> they all end up with some cripplingly bad injury.
>>>
>>> Personally I'll cycle up and down to about 275 on my deadlift and back
>>> down to 225. When I get up to that 275 level I could keep going but I
>>> find that the risk/reward calculus goes completely out of whack. In
>>> the people who push past that, with all due respect, I think they have
>>> a problem. This is especially, perhaps exclusively, applied to people
>>> who do this purely out of some "battle against themselves". In fact
>>> that is the argument I'll hear most often when I go on my periodic
>>> tirade on this subject.
>>
>>Where is the evidence of the 'risk'? Powerlifting has very small risk
>>associated with it. olympic lifting is even smaller.
>
>I've posted the link in the past to the only study I could find on
>recreational powerlifters. But my comments to MFW are really based
>only on what I've seen people post here. You hurt yourself so often
>you even have your own word associated with it.
>
>This seems just a little bit crazy.

Keith's kind of on the elite end of the spectrum. But still, his
injuries seem a lot less than what a pro football player experiences.
Those guys are doing good if they can still walk without assistance
when they get old.

If 275 is where you want to limit yourself, though, then maybe you
should consider doing that for reps. I've only been deadlifting again
for about two months, and was able to work up to 365 very quickly. I
think my limiting factor now is going to be my grip, but today it felt
stronger than the last time, so I think I'm adapting and hope to add
another 10lbs soon. This is just 20 or so pounds over the "fit guy"
level that Bryce's charts list, so I'm not particularly impressed by
it, but I'll be aiming for "animal" status as my near-term goal
because I already surpass that in bench.

You seem to have set some artificial limit for yourself. Do you have
anything that you believe is objective to limit yourself to only 275,
or is that just a "gut feeling"? Where does your fear come from?

-----------
Proton Soup

"Thanks for noticing that I didn't actually say anything." - Mike Lane

Keith Hobman
November 28th 04, 01:19 PM
In article >, Usenet Posting
> wrote:

> On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 15:42:00 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
> wrote:
>
> >In article >, Usenet Posting
> > wrote:
> >
> >> On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 11:58:24 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
> >> wrote:
> >>
> >> >In article >, Usenet Posting
> >> > wrote:
> >> >
> >> >> On Fri, 26 Nov 2004 13:20:14 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
> >> >> wrote:
> >> >>
> >> >> >In article >, Lampi
> >> >> > wrote:
> >> >> >
> >> >> >> I wanted to ask you something about some old programs you sent me.
> >> >> >>
> >> >> >> lampi at powerlifting dot ca
> >> >> >
> >> >> >Sent you an email, but it can be good to ask the questions on
this forum
> >> >> >as well. It is always good to get other perspectives. I find
there are a
> >> >> >number of people on this forum who may not be powerlifters, but
can raise
> >> >> >important questions and get you thinking. Lyle. Elzi. Whit. And
of course
> >> >> >the other powerlifters also have perspective - Will and John come
> >> >> >immediately to mind. And our 'mystery' raw guy who is hella strong. And
> >> >> >I'm missing a lot of other people.
> >> >>
> >> >> me. Duh.
> >> >
> >> >Well. I can count on a dissenting opinion on the need to lift heavy
> >> >things, right?
> >> >
> >>
> >> Hee, yes.
> >>
> >> >I do tend to agree testing 1RM is unnecessary for most people. But heavy
> >> >training can be done without 1RM.
> >>
> >> But why? My question has always been why take the risk? When does
> >> the risk/reward ratio get so far out of whack that it is a form of
> >> insane behavior. Up to a point I think there are enormous benefits in
> >> terms of physical and mental well-being that FAR outweigh the risk of
> >> injury. But I see people here posting over and over about every
> >> little increment and you just have to wait and eventually, one by one,
> >> they all end up with some cripplingly bad injury.
> >>
> >> Personally I'll cycle up and down to about 275 on my deadlift and back
> >> down to 225. When I get up to that 275 level I could keep going but I
> >> find that the risk/reward calculus goes completely out of whack. In
> >> the people who push past that, with all due respect, I think they have
> >> a problem. This is especially, perhaps exclusively, applied to people
> >> who do this purely out of some "battle against themselves". In fact
> >> that is the argument I'll hear most often when I go on my periodic
> >> tirade on this subject.
> >
> >Where is the evidence of the 'risk'? Powerlifting has very small risk
> >associated with it. olympic lifting is even smaller.
>
> I've posted the link in the past to the only study I could find on
> recreational powerlifters. But my comments to MFW are really based
> only on what I've seen people post here. You hurt yourself so often
> you even have your own word associated with it.
>
> This seems just a little bit crazy.

Only once in 7 years of lifting. And the lesson was learned. It was how I
hurt myself and the unfortunate series of injuries after the biceps tear
that led to the phrase being coined.

And the strength list was wicked funny in those days anyhow. Everyone got
juiced for something. They had to work a bit to find some material for me.

:^)

Proton Soup
November 28th 04, 10:57 PM
On Sun, 28 Nov 2004 20:00:04 GMT, Usenet Posting
> wrote:

>On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 23:38:40 -0600, Proton Soup >
>wrote:
>
>>On Sun, 28 Nov 2004 05:04:25 GMT, Usenet Posting
> wrote:
>>
>>>On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 15:42:00 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
>>>wrote:
>>>
>>>>In article >, Usenet Posting
> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 11:58:24 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> >In article >, Usenet Posting
>>>>> > wrote:
>>>>> >
>>>>> >> On Fri, 26 Nov 2004 13:20:14 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
>>>>> >> wrote:
>>>>> >>
>>>>> >> >In article >, Lampi
>>>>> >> > wrote:
>>>>> >> >
>>>>> >> >> I wanted to ask you something about some old programs you sent me.
>>>>> >> >>
>>>>> >> >> lampi at powerlifting dot ca
>>>>> >> >
>>>>> >> >Sent you an email, but it can be good to ask the questions on this forum
>>>>> >> >as well. It is always good to get other perspectives. I find there are a
>>>>> >> >number of people on this forum who may not be powerlifters, but can raise
>>>>> >> >important questions and get you thinking. Lyle. Elzi. Whit. And of course
>>>>> >> >the other powerlifters also have perspective - Will and John come
>>>>> >> >immediately to mind. And our 'mystery' raw guy who is hella strong. And
>>>>> >> >I'm missing a lot of other people.
>>>>> >>
>>>>> >> me. Duh.
>>>>> >
>>>>> >Well. I can count on a dissenting opinion on the need to lift heavy
>>>>> >things, right?
>>>>> >
>>>>>
>>>>> Hee, yes.
>>>>>
>>>>> >I do tend to agree testing 1RM is unnecessary for most people. But heavy
>>>>> >training can be done without 1RM.
>>>>>
>>>>> But why? My question has always been why take the risk? When does
>>>>> the risk/reward ratio get so far out of whack that it is a form of
>>>>> insane behavior. Up to a point I think there are enormous benefits in
>>>>> terms of physical and mental well-being that FAR outweigh the risk of
>>>>> injury. But I see people here posting over and over about every
>>>>> little increment and you just have to wait and eventually, one by one,
>>>>> they all end up with some cripplingly bad injury.
>>>>>
>>>>> Personally I'll cycle up and down to about 275 on my deadlift and back
>>>>> down to 225. When I get up to that 275 level I could keep going but I
>>>>> find that the risk/reward calculus goes completely out of whack. In
>>>>> the people who push past that, with all due respect, I think they have
>>>>> a problem. This is especially, perhaps exclusively, applied to people
>>>>> who do this purely out of some "battle against themselves". In fact
>>>>> that is the argument I'll hear most often when I go on my periodic
>>>>> tirade on this subject.
>>>>
>>>>Where is the evidence of the 'risk'? Powerlifting has very small risk
>>>>associated with it. olympic lifting is even smaller.
>>>
>>>I've posted the link in the past to the only study I could find on
>>>recreational powerlifters. But my comments to MFW are really based
>>>only on what I've seen people post here. You hurt yourself so often
>>>you even have your own word associated with it.
>>>
>>>This seems just a little bit crazy.
>>
>>Keith's kind of on the elite end of the spectrum. But still, his
>>injuries seem a lot less than what a pro football player experiences.
>>Those guys are doing good if they can still walk without assistance
>>when they get old.
>>
>
>Yes but they also earn a very handsome living AND have insurance that
>covers an opulent lifestyle if they have a catastrophic injury.
>
>>If 275 is where you want to limit yourself, though, then maybe you
>>should consider doing that for reps. I've only been deadlifting again
>
>I rarely do less than 10 reps on any exercise, deadlifting is no
>exception.
>
>>for about two months, and was able to work up to 365 very quickly. I
>
>So what? I mean, seriously, what does it matter?

Doesn't matter to you or anyone else, but it matters to me.
Personally, I want to lift more.

>>think my limiting factor now is going to be my grip, but today it felt
>>stronger than the last time, so I think I'm adapting and hope to add
>>another 10lbs soon. This is just 20 or so pounds over the "fit guy"
>>level that Bryce's charts list, so I'm not particularly impressed by
>>it, but I'll be aiming for "animal" status as my near-term goal
>>because I already surpass that in bench.
>>
>
>Yes but why?

Why not? Increasing my performance encourages me to do two things,
increase lean mass, and decrease fat. Both of those things equal a
healthier me in my experience.

>>You seem to have set some artificial limit for yourself. Do you have
>>anything that you believe is objective to limit yourself to only 275,
>>or is that just a "gut feeling"? Where does your fear come from?
>
>Again, it is a risk/benefit thing. When I need to start either doing
>more "advanced' routines or adding small increments to the bar that is
>when I call it "high enough". I want to go to the gym and actually
>just have fun, stay fit and strong, and NOT get hurt.

Well, just do whatever works for you then. I'd have a hard time with
boredom if I just did the same thing over and over and over and over,
without ever trying something new or reaching some goal.

-----------
Proton Soup

"Thanks for noticing that I didn't actually say anything." - Mike Lane

Lucas Buck
December 3rd 04, 08:12 AM
On Sun, 28 Nov 2004 20:00:04 GMT, Usenet Posting >
wrote:

>On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 23:38:40 -0600, Proton Soup >
>wrote:
>
>>On Sun, 28 Nov 2004 05:04:25 GMT, Usenet Posting
> wrote:
>>
>>>On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 15:42:00 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
>>>wrote:
>>>
>>>>In article >, Usenet Posting
> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 11:58:24 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> >In article >, Usenet Posting
>>>>> > wrote:
>>>>> >
>>>>> >> On Fri, 26 Nov 2004 13:20:14 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
>>>>> >> wrote:
>>>>> >>
>>>>> >> >In article >, Lampi
>>>>> >> > wrote:
>>>>> >> >
>>>>> >> >> I wanted to ask you something about some old programs you sent me.
>>>>> >> >>
>>>>> >> >> lampi at powerlifting dot ca
>>>>> >> >
>>>>> >> >Sent you an email, but it can be good to ask the questions on this forum
>>>>> >> >as well. It is always good to get other perspectives. I find there are a
>>>>> >> >number of people on this forum who may not be powerlifters, but can raise
>>>>> >> >important questions and get you thinking. Lyle. Elzi. Whit. And of course
>>>>> >> >the other powerlifters also have perspective - Will and John come
>>>>> >> >immediately to mind. And our 'mystery' raw guy who is hella strong. And
>>>>> >> >I'm missing a lot of other people.
>>>>> >>
>>>>> >> me. Duh.
>>>>> >
>>>>> >Well. I can count on a dissenting opinion on the need to lift heavy
>>>>> >things, right?
>>>>> >
>>>>>
>>>>> Hee, yes.
>>>>>
>>>>> >I do tend to agree testing 1RM is unnecessary for most people. But heavy
>>>>> >training can be done without 1RM.
>>>>>
>>>>> But why? My question has always been why take the risk? When does
>>>>> the risk/reward ratio get so far out of whack that it is a form of
>>>>> insane behavior. Up to a point I think there are enormous benefits in
>>>>> terms of physical and mental well-being that FAR outweigh the risk of
>>>>> injury. But I see people here posting over and over about every
>>>>> little increment and you just have to wait and eventually, one by one,
>>>>> they all end up with some cripplingly bad injury.
>>>>>
>>>>> Personally I'll cycle up and down to about 275 on my deadlift and back
>>>>> down to 225. When I get up to that 275 level I could keep going but I
>>>>> find that the risk/reward calculus goes completely out of whack. In
>>>>> the people who push past that, with all due respect, I think they have
>>>>> a problem. This is especially, perhaps exclusively, applied to people
>>>>> who do this purely out of some "battle against themselves". In fact
>>>>> that is the argument I'll hear most often when I go on my periodic
>>>>> tirade on this subject.
>>>>
>>>>Where is the evidence of the 'risk'? Powerlifting has very small risk
>>>>associated with it. olympic lifting is even smaller.
>>>
>>>I've posted the link in the past to the only study I could find on
>>>recreational powerlifters. But my comments to MFW are really based
>>>only on what I've seen people post here. You hurt yourself so often
>>>you even have your own word associated with it.
>>>
>>>This seems just a little bit crazy.
>>
>>Keith's kind of on the elite end of the spectrum. But still, his
>>injuries seem a lot less than what a pro football player experiences.
>>Those guys are doing good if they can still walk without assistance
>>when they get old.
>>
>
>Yes but they also earn a very handsome living AND have insurance that
>covers an opulent lifestyle if they have a catastrophic injury.
>
>>If 275 is where you want to limit yourself, though, then maybe you
>>should consider doing that for reps. I've only been deadlifting again
>
>I rarely do less than 10 reps on any exercise, deadlifting is no
>exception.
>
>>for about two months, and was able to work up to 365 very quickly. I
>
>So what? I mean, seriously, what does it matter?
>
>>think my limiting factor now is going to be my grip, but today it felt
>>stronger than the last time, so I think I'm adapting and hope to add
>>another 10lbs soon. This is just 20 or so pounds over the "fit guy"
>>level that Bryce's charts list, so I'm not particularly impressed by
>>it, but I'll be aiming for "animal" status as my near-term goal
>>because I already surpass that in bench.
>>
>
>Yes but why?
>
>>You seem to have set some artificial limit for yourself. Do you have
>>anything that you believe is objective to limit yourself to only 275,
>>or is that just a "gut feeling"? Where does your fear come from?
>
>Again, it is a risk/benefit thing. When I need to start either doing
>more "advanced' routines or adding small increments to the bar that is
>when I call it "high enough". I want to go to the gym and actually
>just have fun, stay fit and strong, and NOT get hurt.

Translation: he's one of those creepy guys who hangs out in the locker
room and showers WAY too much.