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View Full Version : OT sorta?: Quitting smoking (which will help for sure with workouts)


B Walker
December 2nd 04, 07:58 PM
I've been working out now for a year using one of Krista's beginners
workouts (4 day split) with some added shoulder exercises.. and saw some
progress but slow of course.. well, being a smoker I'm sure has a huge
affect on that (oxygen intake, circulation..etc)..

Well, a while back something came up that's changing everything in a
couple of weeks, which I think might be the best time to quit (due to
habits that will already be broken, perhaps it'll be easier to break
this one when everything else is different).

Thought there might be other ex-smokers here that might offer advice,
links, thoughts..etc.. My current plan is to just go cold turkey, after
a week of serious cutting down (again, long story that I'll not try to
explain).

Tia

--
DoD# 2223, OFCC #3122
Meum scapha volitare plenum anguillae

Paul Cassel
December 2nd 04, 10:47 PM
B Walker wrote:
> I've been working out now for a year using one of Krista's beginners
> workouts (4 day split) with some added shoulder exercises.. and saw some
> progress but slow of course.. well, being a smoker I'm sure has a huge
> affect on that (oxygen intake, circulation..etc)..
>
> Well, a while back something came up that's changing everything in a
> couple of weeks, which I think might be the best time to quit (due to
> habits that will already be broken, perhaps it'll be easier to break
> this one when everything else is different).
>
> Thought there might be other ex-smokers here that might offer advice,
> links, thoughts..etc.. My current plan is to just go cold turkey, after
> a week of serious cutting down (again, long story that I'll not try to
> explain).
>

I quit a 3 pack a day habit. Very tough for me. What I did when, at one
time, I got really overwhelmed with the desire to smoke was to leave
town. I just split for a few days and holed up in Palm Springs (I was
living in SoCal then). The change of scene worked for me.

Keep this in mind with smoking and ALL bad habits:

If you have a problem and then take a cigarette due to that problem, you
then have two problems.

-paul

Lurker
December 2nd 04, 10:58 PM
Paul Cassel wrote:
> B Walker wrote:
>
>> I've been working out now for a year using one of Krista's beginners
>> workouts (4 day split) with some added shoulder exercises.. and saw
>> some progress but slow of course.. well, being a smoker I'm sure has
>> a huge affect on that (oxygen intake, circulation..etc)..
>>
>> Well, a while back something came up that's changing everything in a
>> couple of weeks, which I think might be the best time to quit (due to
>> habits that will already be broken, perhaps it'll be easier to break
>> this one when everything else is different).
>>
>> Thought there might be other ex-smokers here that might offer advice,
>> links, thoughts..etc.. My current plan is to just go cold turkey,
>> after a week of serious cutting down (again, long story that I'll not
>> try to explain).
>>
>
> I quit a 3 pack a day habit. Very tough for me. What I did when, at one
> time, I got really overwhelmed with the desire to smoke was to leave
> town. I just split for a few days and holed up in Palm Springs (I was
> living in SoCal then). The change of scene worked for me.
>
> Keep this in mind with smoking and ALL bad habits:
>
> If you have a problem and then take a cigarette due to that problem, you
> then have two problems.
>
> -paul

Used to smoke two packs of Paul Malls a day. All I can say is drink an
absolute ton of water while quitting. I mean in the 2 gallon a day range
for a week or two. It helps a little with the headaches, and keeps your
stomach full so that you don't turn your smoking habit into a grazing habit.

This also helps with quitting caffine if you are interested. And make
sure to get enough fiber in your diet. Some people experience some
unexpected pooh pooh problems too. (Er.. or so I have heard)

Be prepared for an ugly time. You have to change your brain chemistry
back to not thinking it needs nicotine to feel "normal". Once cigarette
smoke disgusts you again you know you have made it.

Oh, and avoid things that make you want to smoke, like going to the
local for Monday night football, etc.

--
Lurker

300_30%_31yo/???_??%/245_15%_32yo
Miracle of Medicine
http://jamesrobert.us

John Hanson
December 2nd 04, 11:30 PM
On Thu, 02 Dec 2004 14:58:23 -0500, B Walker
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

>I've been working out now for a year using one of Krista's beginners
>workouts (4 day split) with some added shoulder exercises.. and saw some
>progress but slow of course.. well, being a smoker I'm sure has a huge
>affect on that (oxygen intake, circulation..etc)..
>
>Well, a while back something came up that's changing everything in a
>couple of weeks, which I think might be the best time to quit (due to
>habits that will already be broken, perhaps it'll be easier to break
>this one when everything else is different).
>
>Thought there might be other ex-smokers here that might offer advice,
>links, thoughts..etc.. My current plan is to just go cold turkey, after
>a week of serious cutting down (again, long story that I'll not try to
>explain).
>
I got drunk and smoked a ton the night before. When I got up, I took
my half pack of heaters and ripped them in half and threw them away.
Then, everytime I felt like having a heater, I'd take a drink of
water. It's been over 5 years since I've taken a drag of a cigarette.

ray miller
December 2nd 04, 11:39 PM
On Thu, 02 Dec 2004 14:58:23 -0500, B Walker
> wrote:

>I've been working out now for a year using one of Krista's beginners
>workouts (4 day split) with some added shoulder exercises.. and saw some
>progress but slow of course.. well, being a smoker I'm sure has a huge
>affect on that (oxygen intake, circulation..etc)..
>
>Well, a while back something came up that's changing everything in a
>couple of weeks, which I think might be the best time to quit (due to
>habits that will already be broken, perhaps it'll be easier to break
>this one when everything else is different).
>
>Thought there might be other ex-smokers here that might offer advice,
>links, thoughts..etc.. My current plan is to just go cold turkey, after
>a week of serious cutting down (again, long story that I'll not try to
>explain).

Don't cut down, just give up, and don't wait, do it now. If you have
decided to give up why wait.
The nicotine withdrawal is only a few days, but you might get moody. I
gave up when I got flu, so no-one was around to get yelled at.
After that it's a matter of breaking habits, like having a cigarette
after dinner/sex/meetings etc. You will get bad cravings, but you just
have to butch up and not smoke. Stay away from temptation (typically
the pub) until you have it firmly under control and try to have
someone around to act as your conscience.
I still craved cigarettes a year or more later, so one evening I had
several cigars till I was physically sick. I haven't really wanted to
smoke since.

Ray
--
rmnsuk
273/184/182

John Hanson
December 2nd 04, 11:57 PM
On Thu, 02 Dec 2004 23:39:56 GMT, ray miller
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

>On Thu, 02 Dec 2004 14:58:23 -0500, B Walker
> wrote:
>
>>I've been working out now for a year using one of Krista's beginners
>>workouts (4 day split) with some added shoulder exercises.. and saw some
>>progress but slow of course.. well, being a smoker I'm sure has a huge
>>affect on that (oxygen intake, circulation..etc)..
>>
>>Well, a while back something came up that's changing everything in a
>>couple of weeks, which I think might be the best time to quit (due to
>>habits that will already be broken, perhaps it'll be easier to break
>>this one when everything else is different).
>>
>>Thought there might be other ex-smokers here that might offer advice,
>>links, thoughts..etc.. My current plan is to just go cold turkey, after
>>a week of serious cutting down (again, long story that I'll not try to
>>explain).
>
>Don't cut down, just give up, and don't wait, do it now. If you have
>decided to give up why wait.
>The nicotine withdrawal is only a few days, but you might get moody. I
>gave up when I got flu, so no-one was around to get yelled at.
>After that it's a matter of breaking habits, like having a cigarette
>after dinner/sex/meetings etc. You will get bad cravings, but you just
>have to butch up and not smoke. Stay away from temptation (typically
>the pub) until you have it firmly under control and try to have
>someone around to act as your conscience.

Good point. I didn't drink for 3 weeks after I quit to avoid the
whole drinking-cigarette thingy.

>I still craved cigarettes a year or more later, so one evening I had
>several cigars till I was physically sick. I haven't really wanted to
>smoke since.
>
I don't dare smoke a cigar and I sure loved them so. The really big
thick ones that take hours to smoke.

Per Elmsäter
December 3rd 04, 09:34 AM
B Walker wrote:
> I've been working out now for a year using one of Krista's beginners
> workouts (4 day split) with some added shoulder exercises.. and saw
> some progress but slow of course.. well, being a smoker I'm sure has
> a huge affect on that (oxygen intake, circulation..etc)..
>
> Well, a while back something came up that's changing everything in a
> couple of weeks, which I think might be the best time to quit (due to
> habits that will already be broken, perhaps it'll be easier to break
> this one when everything else is different).
>
> Thought there might be other ex-smokers here that might offer advice,
> links, thoughts..etc.. My current plan is to just go cold turkey,
> after a week of serious cutting down (again, long story that I'll not
> try to explain).
>
> Tia


I was a bigtime smoker for over 38 years. After I turned 50 I started riding
a bike and working out in the gym. I liked it and enjoyed the progress I was
making. One day it just suddenly dawned upon me how much time I was wasting
on my workouts due to my smoking. Ie I was not getting the results I would
get if I wasn't smoking. What a waste of time and money. Once this sunk in I
just simply didn't buy any more. This process was about a 12 hour job, maybe
while finishing my last pack. It was easy and I've never looked back. Yes my
results improved tremendously.
I'd always said that I could quit whenever I wanted to. Obviously I never
wanted to. All of a sudden I wanted to and it was as simple as that.

--
Perre
If you can't quit you don't really wanna quit.

B Walker
December 3rd 04, 01:05 PM
Lurker wrote:
> Paul Cassel wrote:
>
>> B Walker wrote:
>>
>>> I've been working out now for a year using one of Krista's beginners
>>> workouts (4 day split) with some added shoulder exercises.. and saw
>>> some progress but slow of course.. well, being a smoker I'm sure has
>>> a huge affect on that (oxygen intake, circulation..etc)..
>>>
>>> Well, a while back something came up that's changing everything in a
>>> couple of weeks, which I think might be the best time to quit (due to
>>> habits that will already be broken, perhaps it'll be easier to break
>>> this one when everything else is different).
>>>
>>> Thought there might be other ex-smokers here that might offer advice,
>>> links, thoughts..etc.. My current plan is to just go cold turkey,
>>> after a week of serious cutting down (again, long story that I'll not
>>> try to explain).
>>>
>>
>> I quit a 3 pack a day habit. Very tough for me. What I did when, at
>> one time, I got really overwhelmed with the desire to smoke was to
>> leave town. I just split for a few days and holed up in Palm Springs
>> (I was living in SoCal then). The change of scene worked for me.
>>
>> Keep this in mind with smoking and ALL bad habits:
>>
>> If you have a problem and then take a cigarette due to that problem,
>> you then have two problems.
>>
>> -paul
>
>
> Used to smoke two packs of Paul Malls a day. All I can say is drink an
> absolute ton of water while quitting. I mean in the 2 gallon a day range
> for a week or two. It helps a little with the headaches, and keeps your
> stomach full so that you don't turn your smoking habit into a grazing
> habit.
>
> This also helps with quitting caffine if you are interested. And make
> sure to get enough fiber in your diet. Some people experience some
> unexpected pooh pooh problems too. (Er.. or so I have heard)
>
> Be prepared for an ugly time. You have to change your brain chemistry
> back to not thinking it needs nicotine to feel "normal". Once cigarette
> smoke disgusts you again you know you have made it.
>
> Oh, and avoid things that make you want to smoke, like going to the
> local for Monday night football, etc.

Luckily I don't do the monday night football thing, and as long as I
keep busy I can deal with not smoking for days (literally) which I think
it a bit weird.. In a little over a week I'll be on a five day road
trip accross the country, which I think may keep me occupied enough to help.




--
DoD# 2223, OFCC #3122
Meum scapha volitare plenum anguillae

B Walker
December 3rd 04, 01:12 PM
Per Elmsäter wrote:
> B Walker wrote:
>
>>I've been working out now for a year using one of Krista's beginners
>>workouts (4 day split) with some added shoulder exercises.. and saw
>>some progress but slow of course.. well, being a smoker I'm sure has
>>a huge affect on that (oxygen intake, circulation..etc)..
>>
>>Well, a while back something came up that's changing everything in a
>>couple of weeks, which I think might be the best time to quit (due to
>>habits that will already be broken, perhaps it'll be easier to break
>>this one when everything else is different).
>>
>>Thought there might be other ex-smokers here that might offer advice,
>>links, thoughts..etc.. My current plan is to just go cold turkey,
>>after a week of serious cutting down (again, long story that I'll not
>>try to explain).
>>
>>Tia
>
>
>
> I was a bigtime smoker for over 38 years. After I turned 50 I started riding
> a bike and working out in the gym. I liked it and enjoyed the progress I was
> making. One day it just suddenly dawned upon me how much time I was wasting
> on my workouts due to my smoking. Ie I was not getting the results I would
> get if I wasn't smoking. What a waste of time and money. Once this sunk in I
> just simply didn't buy any more. This process was about a 12 hour job, maybe
> while finishing my last pack. It was easy and I've never looked back. Yes my
> results improved tremendously.
> I'd always said that I could quit whenever I wanted to. Obviously I never
> wanted to. All of a sudden I wanted to and it was as simple as that.

Yup, you gotta want to.. Their are some complicated personal reasons
that I'm not quitting now.. mostly because I know I would fail at this
point and I don't think that would help me in the long run.

Thanks everybody for the insights, I have a feeling the hardest thing
for me will be the habit, I can go for several days without smoking as
long as I have something else to occupy my mind so I don't think the
physical addiction will be too tough.


--
DoD# 2223, OFCC #3122
Meum scapha volitare plenum anguillae

Paul Cassel
December 3rd 04, 01:48 PM
John Hanson wrote:

>
> I don't dare smoke a cigar and I sure loved them so. The really big
> thick ones that take hours to smoke.
>

Gee, but do I miss a good hand rolled cigar too. No way would I chance
smoking or even chewing on one now as I sure don't need a return to the
slavery which was tobacco (for me).

For a few years there, looking backwards, I realize that smoking was a
significant part of my life. As soon as I realized that I couldn't quit
anytime I wished to, I got the juice to actually quit. Being addicted
was easy to ignore until I knew I was - then it wasn't easy to ignore at
all.

-paul

Per Elmsäter
December 3rd 04, 03:36 PM
B Walker wrote:
> Per Elmsäter wrote:
>> B Walker wrote:
>>
>>> I've been working out now for a year using one of Krista's beginners
>>> workouts (4 day split) with some added shoulder exercises.. and saw
>>> some progress but slow of course.. well, being a smoker I'm sure
>>> has a huge affect on that (oxygen intake, circulation..etc)..
>>>
>>> Well, a while back something came up that's changing everything in a
>>> couple of weeks, which I think might be the best time to quit (due
>>> to habits that will already be broken, perhaps it'll be easier to
>>> break this one when everything else is different).
>>>
>>> Thought there might be other ex-smokers here that might offer
>>> advice, links, thoughts..etc.. My current plan is to just go cold
>>> turkey, after a week of serious cutting down (again, long story
>>> that I'll not try to explain).
>>>
>>> Tia
>>
>>
>>
>> I was a bigtime smoker for over 38 years. After I turned 50 I
>> started riding a bike and working out in the gym. I liked it and
>> enjoyed the progress I was making. One day it just suddenly dawned
>> upon me how much time I was wasting on my workouts due to my
>> smoking. Ie I was not getting the results I would get if I wasn't
>> smoking. What a waste of time and money. Once this sunk in I just
>> simply didn't buy any more. This process was about a 12 hour job,
>> maybe while finishing my last pack. It was easy and I've never
>> looked back. Yes my results improved tremendously.
>> I'd always said that I could quit whenever I wanted to. Obviously I
>> never wanted to. All of a sudden I wanted to and it was as simple as
>> that.
>
> Yup, you gotta want to.. Their are some complicated personal reasons
> that I'm not quitting now.. mostly because I know I would fail at this
> point and I don't think that would help me in the long run.
>
> Thanks everybody for the insights, I have a feeling the hardest thing
> for me will be the habit, I can go for several days without smoking as
> long as I have something else to occupy my mind so I don't think the
> physical addiction will be too tough.

Fear of failure was deeply rooted into me after the first several futile
attempts of quitting. I think from the age 25 and on. This kept me from even
trying again as I didn't wanna be a loser. Not until I threw that fear away
and really wanted to, did it work. As it happened I forgot I was afraid of
failing and the decision of really wanting to was not so much a conscious
rationale as a feeling from deep down inside that I wanted all those things
healthwise and especially athletics wise, that I could not have as long as I
kept on smoking.
--
Perre
I gave up on SPAM and redirected it to hotmail instead.

ray miller
December 3rd 04, 07:26 PM
>Not until I threw that fear away
>and really wanted to, did it work.

A bit like losing weight it doesn't work till you "really want to".
Then the only way you'll fail is if you give up trying. Obviously
people with obsessive personalities can find such tasks easier.

Ray

--
rmnsuk
273/184/182