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Geezer From The Freezer
December 6th 04, 09:22 AM
I've been ill for a week with sore throat and a bad chest.

Do you lot still work out when you are under the weather, or
rest til you recover?

Per Elmsäter
December 6th 04, 11:18 AM
Geezer From The Freezer wrote:
> I've been ill for a week with sore throat and a bad chest.
>
> Do you lot still work out when you are under the weather, or
> rest til you recover?

I don't do any Cardio.
I drop my weights a little bit and sometimes the reps. Kind of trying to do
a workout without getting wasted and just maintaining. It's worked so far
for me. If I have a problem getting out of bed, no I don't go to the gym ;)
As for cardio work we have a rule of thumb among cyclists at least. If
you're sore in the throat and above go ahead and train but take it a little
bit easier. If it's below the throat, do not train!!!!!

DISCLAIMER I am not a doctor and following my advice may be hazardous to
your health!!!!

--
Perre
I gave up on SPAM and redirected it to hotmail instead.

Geezer From The Freezer
December 6th 04, 01:59 PM
"Per Elms=E4ter" wrote:
<snip>
> =

> DISCLAIMER I am not a doctor and following my advice may be hazardous t=
o
> your health!!!!


hahahahah - of course ;)

Steve Freides
December 6th 04, 04:19 PM
"Geezer From The Freezer" > wrote in message
...
> I've been ill for a week with sore throat and a bad chest.
>
> Do you lot still work out when you are under the weather, or
> rest til you recover?

One guideline recommended to runners is that if you're sick in the neck
or above, it's OK to exercise, but if it's in your chest, best to take
it easy. Lifting ain't running, of course, and I tend to lift almost
every day. If I'm feeling crappy, a day or two off is usually enough to
let me start up again with light weights and/or lower volume. I find
that stopping lifting altogether usually makes me feel worse, not
better, and I don't see the point in that.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com

User
December 6th 04, 07:19 PM
> Do you lot still work out when you are under the weather, or

No. I rest and get well and hit it extra hard when I start up again.

Incidentally, since I started really lifting and running (instead of doing
it half-assed) no cold or flu has ever lasted more than two days.

00doc
December 6th 04, 08:54 PM
Personally, I take some time off. That is mor eperosnal experience than
a medical opinion. I find that on the rare occasion that I get sick
that being run down usually plays a part and that I get better pretty
fast if I get some rest.

Besides, if you have really been training hard you should find that
taking a week off now and then doesn't do any harm. I usually find that
I am stronger when I go back.

--
00doc

00doc
December 6th 04, 08:55 PM
Personally, I take some time off. That is mor eperosnal experience than
a medical opinion. I find that on the rare occasion that I get sick
that being run down usually plays a part and that I get better pretty
fast if I get some rest.

Besides, if you have really been training hard you should find that
taking a week off now and then doesn't do any harm. I usually find that
I am stronger when I go back.

--
00doc

00doc
December 6th 04, 08:55 PM
Personally, I take some time off. That is mor eperosnal experience than
a medical opinion. I find that on the rare occasion that I get sick
that being run down usually plays a part and that I get better pretty
fast if I get some rest.

Besides, if you have really been training hard you should find that
taking a week off now and then doesn't do any harm. I usually find that
I am stronger when I go back.

--
00doc

Lyle McDonald
December 6th 04, 09:00 PM
00doc wrote:

> Personally, I take some time off. That is mor eperosnal experience than
> a medical opinion. I find that on the rare occasion that I get sick
> that being run down usually plays a part and that I get better pretty
> fast if I get some rest.
>
> Besides, if you have really been training hard you should find that
> taking a week off now and then doesn't do any harm. I usually find that
> I am stronger when I go back.
>

I have generally found, and there is apparently some research to back
this up, that a moderate workout tends to make me get well faster while
a heavy workout makes it far worse. In that moderate activity tends to
stimulate the immune system, and heavy can tend to impair it, this makes
sense.

Of course, the key is keeping it moderate which can be hard for a lot of
gym hardheads.

Lyle

Dally
December 6th 04, 09:27 PM
00doc wrote:
> Personally, I take some time off. That is more perosnal experience than
> a medical opinion. I find that on the rare occasion that I get sick
> that being run down usually plays a part and that I get better pretty
> fast if I get some rest.

That's what I figure. I've got some low-level chest crap going on and I
just didn't feel like going to the gym... so I declared two weeks of
strategic deconditioning. I've got some over-use injury stuff going on
and I figure it'll heal, my chest will heal and two weeks away from iron
will just rededicate me when I get back at it.

I've still been doing some cardio, though, on a very limited basis,
i.e., half an hour of swimming or twenty minutes of elliptical. I just
feel too crappy if I don't move enough.

> Besides, if you have really been training hard you should find that
> taking a week off now and then doesn't do any harm. I usually find that
> I am stronger when I go back.

I have a theory that it helps me get some of that newbie gain magic.
I'm definitely not STRONGER when I get back, but I rapidly regain
everything I had and I think the subsequent weight loss is more
partitioned towards fat. (I'm still catabolic, this doesn't pertain to
a lot of you guys.)

Oh, and there's one more reason to take a break: because it makes you
practice restarting. One of the realities of life is that **** happens.
Over-time or sickness or family emergency and you get off schedule.
That's not a big problem in the scheme of things, but I historically had
trouble getting back into my exercise routine and a one week layoff
would become six months out of the gym. (There's a reason I got too fat
and eating too much was only half of it.)

I've discovered that getting back to the gym as fast as I can after some
layoff gets easier and easier the more often I practice it. So now I
figure two weeks off from weights is just another opportunity to
practice an important life skill.

Dally

prick
December 7th 04, 12:42 AM
"Geezer From The Freezer" > wrote in message
...
> I've been ill for a week with sore throat and a bad chest.
>
> Do you lot still work out when you are under the weather, or
> rest til you recover?
I wait until I recover. It can prolong illness and the body is not in any
position to grow when it is coping with illness.

Lordy
December 7th 04, 11:52 AM
Geezer From The Freezer > wrote in
:

> I've been ill for a week with sore throat and a bad chest.
>
> Do you lot still work out when you are under the weather, or
> rest til you recover?

Note if you have flu, excercise (certainly running) can make it far worse.

I know of one instance where a healthy fit runner has died as a result of
running with flu. (The virus gets into your heart or something like that)

Some useful info here (including the above the neck rule)
http://outside.away.com/outside/magazine/200001/200001body2.html

Also
"But be warned: For the young and healthy, vigorous exercise with the flu
may cause a virus to invade the heart or the sac that surrounds it, which
can be fatal. That said, don't cut back on nourishment because you can't
exercise—your body needs the calories to fight the illness."

Generally either rest or avoid hard cardio. Weights probably OK to stay
heavy(ish). Eat well. Drink well.

Not a doctor . etc etc.

Lordy

Axel of the North!
December 8th 04, 06:12 AM
On Tue, 07 Dec 2004 00:42:24 GMT, "prick" > wrote:

>"Geezer From The Freezer" > wrote in message
...
>> I've been ill for a week with sore throat and a bad chest.
>>
>> Do you lot still work out when you are under the weather, or
>> rest til you recover?
>I wait until I recover. It can prolong illness and the body is not in any
>position to grow when it is coping with illness.
>

why, thank you, prick. thank you for sharing...