PDA

View Full Version : settling workplace disputes the NYSE way


Donovan Rebbechi
February 8th 05, 04:11 AM
An interesting approach to settling workplace disputes ...

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/06/nyregion/06homefront.html

HOME FRONT
Trading Floor Rivals Settle Scores in Ring
By TANYA MOHN

Published: February 6, 2005

SHORTLY before sunrise on a recent Monday, four men arrived at the
Trinity Boxing Club in Lower Manhattan to jump rope, run on elliptical
trainers and shadow-box, finishing an intense training process: five
days a week for over a month, and twice a day for the previous two
weeks.

They were not professional boxers, but colleagues on the floor of
the New York Stock Exchange. "After months of trash talking, they
decided to settle it in the ring," said Martin Snow, Trinity's
owner and manager. "It's going to be a barn burner."

Cheers,
--
Donovan Rebbechi
http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/

Hobbes
February 8th 05, 04:13 AM
In article >, Donovan Rebbechi
> wrote:

> An interesting approach to settling workplace disputes ...
>
> http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/06/nyregion/06homefront.html
>
> HOME FRONT
> Trading Floor Rivals Settle Scores in Ring
> By TANYA MOHN
>
> Published: February 6, 2005
>
> SHORTLY before sunrise on a recent Monday, four men arrived at the
> Trinity Boxing Club in Lower Manhattan to jump rope, run on elliptical
> trainers and shadow-box, finishing an intense training process: five
> days a week for over a month, and twice a day for the previous two
> weeks.
>
> They were not professional boxers, but colleagues on the floor of
> the New York Stock Exchange. "After months of trash talking, they
> decided to settle it in the ring," said Martin Snow, Trinity's
> owner and manager. "It's going to be a barn burner."

Nothing new about that. My old man used to put gloves on my brothers and I
if we were having a spat, take us to the basement and let us settle our
differences.

--
Keith

Fish! - of Arcadia.
February 8th 05, 04:48 AM
In article >,
says...
> In article >, Donovan Rebbechi
> > wrote:
>
> > An interesting approach to settling workplace disputes ...
> >
> > http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/06/nyregion/06homefront.html
> >
> > HOME FRONT
> > Trading Floor Rivals Settle Scores in Ring
> > By TANYA MOHN
> >
> > Published: February 6, 2005
> >
> > SHORTLY before sunrise on a recent Monday, four men arrived at the
> > Trinity Boxing Club in Lower Manhattan to jump rope, run on elliptical
> > trainers and shadow-box, finishing an intense training process: five
> > days a week for over a month, and twice a day for the previous two
> > weeks.
> >
> > They were not professional boxers, but colleagues on the floor of
> > the New York Stock Exchange. "After months of trash talking, they
> > decided to settle it in the ring," said Martin Snow, Trinity's
> > owner and manager. "It's going to be a barn burner."
>
> Nothing new about that. My old man used to put gloves on my brothers and I
> if we were having a spat, take us to the basement and let us settle our
> differences.
>
>


How very kind.

Charles
February 8th 05, 08:21 AM
On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 22:13:41 -0600, (Hobbes)
wrote:

>In article >, Donovan Rebbechi
> wrote:
>
>> An interesting approach to settling workplace disputes ...
>>
>> http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/06/nyregion/06homefront.html
>>
>> HOME FRONT
>> Trading Floor Rivals Settle Scores in Ring
>> By TANYA MOHN
>>
>> Published: February 6, 2005
>>
>> SHORTLY before sunrise on a recent Monday, four men arrived at the
>> Trinity Boxing Club in Lower Manhattan to jump rope, run on elliptical
>> trainers and shadow-box, finishing an intense training process: five
>> days a week for over a month, and twice a day for the previous two
>> weeks.
>>
>> They were not professional boxers, but colleagues on the floor of
>> the New York Stock Exchange. "After months of trash talking, they
>> decided to settle it in the ring," said Martin Snow, Trinity's
>> owner and manager. "It's going to be a barn burner."
>
>Nothing new about that. My old man used to put gloves on my brothers and I
>if we were having a spat, take us to the basement and let us settle our
>differences.

That is a well-intentioned if misguided form of justice, given that
the biggest/strongest or best 'boxer' will always win the day, but
won't always be in the right.

My own father would formally call 'warring' siblings to his study,
which were known as 'closed door interviews' (CDI's), listen to each
faction, and decide guilt or otherwise, together with any appropriate
punishment warranted, on the evidence presented.

It was a quite 'scary' experience, which worked wonderfully well, and
I have no recollection of him ever resorting to any form of physical
punishment.

Now school was very different ............

elzinator
February 8th 05, 01:37 PM
Donovan Rebbechi wrote:
> An interesting approach to settling workplace disputes ...
>
> http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/06/nyregion/06homefront.html
>
> HOME FRONT
> Trading Floor Rivals Settle Scores in Ring
> By TANYA MOHN
>
> Published: February 6, 2005
>
> SHORTLY before sunrise on a recent Monday, four men arrived at the
> Trinity Boxing Club in Lower Manhattan to jump rope, run on
elliptical
> trainers and shadow-box, finishing an intense training process: five
> days a week for over a month, and twice a day for the previous two
> weeks.
>
> They were not professional boxers, but colleagues on the floor of
> the New York Stock Exchange. "After months of trash talking, they
> decided to settle it in the ring," said Martin Snow, Trinity's
> owner and manager. "It's going to be a barn burner."

An excellent way to settle disputes. What the world needs to settle
international disputes is a large rollarball dome. Pit the political
figures against each other and get it over with.

Or integrate them in a virtual Unreal Tournament bout, but make it
real.

Paul \Mr.Wonderful\ Orndorff
February 8th 05, 01:38 PM
"Donovan Rebbechi" > wrote in message
...
> An interesting approach to settling workplace disputes ...
>
> http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/06/nyregion/06homefront.html
>
> HOME FRONT
> Trading Floor Rivals Settle Scores in Ring
> By TANYA MOHN
>
> Published: February 6, 2005
>
> SHORTLY before sunrise on a recent Monday, four men arrived at the
> Trinity Boxing Club in Lower Manhattan to jump rope, run on elliptical
> trainers and shadow-box, finishing an intense training process: five
> days a week for over a month, and twice a day for the previous two
> weeks.
>
> They were not professional boxers, but colleagues on the floor of
> the New York Stock Exchange. "After months of trash talking, they
> decided to settle it in the ring," said Martin Snow, Trinity's
> owner and manager. "It's going to be a barn burner."
>
> Cheers,
> --
> Donovan Rebbechi
> http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/

How politically incorrect... men behaving like men? Oh heavens no! Expect a
multi-billion dollar lawsuit from female colleagues.

Hobbes
February 8th 05, 02:09 PM
In article >, Fish! - of
Arcadia. > wrote:

> In article >,
> says...
> > In article >, Donovan Rebbechi
> > > wrote:
> >
> > > An interesting approach to settling workplace disputes ...
> > >
> > > http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/06/nyregion/06homefront.html
> > >
> > > HOME FRONT
> > > Trading Floor Rivals Settle Scores in Ring
> > > By TANYA MOHN
> > >
> > > Published: February 6, 2005
> > >
> > > SHORTLY before sunrise on a recent Monday, four men arrived at the
> > > Trinity Boxing Club in Lower Manhattan to jump rope, run on elliptical
> > > trainers and shadow-box, finishing an intense training process: five
> > > days a week for over a month, and twice a day for the previous two
> > > weeks.
> > >
> > > They were not professional boxers, but colleagues on the floor of
> > > the New York Stock Exchange. "After months of trash talking, they
> > > decided to settle it in the ring," said Martin Snow, Trinity's
> > > owner and manager. "It's going to be a barn burner."
> >
> > Nothing new about that. My old man used to put gloves on my brothers and I
> > if we were having a spat, take us to the basement and let us settle our
> > differences.
> >
> >
>
>
> How very kind.

They were pretty big gloves, but you still learnt to get along with your
brothers at a very young age.

It's not a bad idea. I used a variation with my kids. If they were acting
up while we were travelling in the car I'd let them out to jog in front of
the car for a mile or two.

Hobbes
February 8th 05, 02:15 PM
In article >, Charles
> wrote:

> On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 22:13:41 -0600, (Hobbes)
> wrote:
>
> >In article >, Donovan Rebbechi
> > wrote:
> >
> >> An interesting approach to settling workplace disputes ...
> >>
> >> http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/06/nyregion/06homefront.html
> >>
> >> HOME FRONT
> >> Trading Floor Rivals Settle Scores in Ring
> >> By TANYA MOHN
> >>
> >> Published: February 6, 2005
> >>
> >> SHORTLY before sunrise on a recent Monday, four men arrived at the
> >> Trinity Boxing Club in Lower Manhattan to jump rope, run on elliptical
> >> trainers and shadow-box, finishing an intense training process: five
> >> days a week for over a month, and twice a day for the previous two
> >> weeks.
> >>
> >> They were not professional boxers, but colleagues on the floor of
> >> the New York Stock Exchange. "After months of trash talking, they
> >> decided to settle it in the ring," said Martin Snow, Trinity's
> >> owner and manager. "It's going to be a barn burner."
> >
> >Nothing new about that. My old man used to put gloves on my brothers and I
> >if we were having a spat, take us to the basement and let us settle our
> >differences.
>
> That is a well-intentioned if misguided form of justice, given that
> the biggest/strongest or best 'boxer' will always win the day, but
> won't always be in the right.
>
> My own father would formally call 'warring' siblings to his study,
> which were known as 'closed door interviews' (CDI's), listen to each
> faction, and decide guilt or otherwise, together with any appropriate
> punishment warranted, on the evidence presented.
>
> It was a quite 'scary' experience, which worked wonderfully well, and
> I have no recollection of him ever resorting to any form of physical
> punishment.
>
> Now school was very different ............

You misunderstand. THis was only done if we were 'acting up' - having a
spat. Not as a form of punishment at all, but simply to get us to burn off
energy. If you've ever sparred as a kid with 20 oz gloves you'd know what
I mean. It's like getting hit with a pillow. We'd whap each other a few
times and then be giggling and laughing away. Half the time we'd end up
pummelling on Dad.

It was a great idea since my older brother was the same size as me anyhow.
We had a hoot.

Now, if it was a serious offense that required some form of justice, that
was a different matter.

tabber
February 8th 05, 02:34 PM
Hobbes wrote:
> In article >, Charles
> > wrote:
>
> > On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 22:13:41 -0600, (Hobbes)
> > wrote:
> >
> > >In article >, Donovan
Rebbechi
> > > wrote:
> > >
> > >> An interesting approach to settling workplace disputes ...
> > >>
> > >> http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/06/nyregion/06homefront.html
> > >>
> > >> HOME FRONT
> > >> Trading Floor Rivals Settle Scores in Ring
> > >> By TANYA MOHN
> > >>
> > >> Published: February 6, 2005
> > >>
> > >> SHORTLY before sunrise on a recent Monday, four men arrived at
the
> > >> Trinity Boxing Club in Lower Manhattan to jump rope, run on
elliptical
> > >> trainers and shadow-box, finishing an intense training process:
five
> > >> days a week for over a month, and twice a day for the previous
two
> > >> weeks.
> > >>
> > >> They were not professional boxers, but colleagues on the floor
of
> > >> the New York Stock Exchange. "After months of trash talking,
they
> > >> decided to settle it in the ring," said Martin Snow, Trinity's
> > >> owner and manager. "It's going to be a barn burner."
> > >
> > >Nothing new about that. My old man used to put gloves on my
brothers and I
> > >if we were having a spat, take us to the basement and let us
settle our
> > >differences.
> >
> > That is a well-intentioned if misguided form of justice, given that
> > the biggest/strongest or best 'boxer' will always win the day, but
> > won't always be in the right.
> >
> > My own father would formally call 'warring' siblings to his study,
> > which were known as 'closed door interviews' (CDI's), listen to
each
> > faction, and decide guilt or otherwise, together with any
appropriate
> > punishment warranted, on the evidence presented.
> >
> > It was a quite 'scary' experience, which worked wonderfully well,
and
> > I have no recollection of him ever resorting to any form of
physical
> > punishment.
> >
> > Now school was very different ............
>
> You misunderstand. THis was only done if we were 'acting up' - having
a
> spat. Not as a form of punishment at all, but simply to get us to
burn off
> energy. If you've ever sparred as a kid with 20 oz gloves you'd know
what
> I mean. It's like getting hit with a pillow. We'd whap each other a
few
> times and then be giggling and laughing away. Half the time we'd end
up
> pummelling on Dad.
>
> It was a great idea since my older brother was the same size as me
anyhow.
> We had a hoot.
>
> Now, if it was a serious offense that required some form of justice,
that
> was a different matter.

That's were the bamboo came into play...

February 8th 05, 03:34 PM
Charles wrote:
> On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 22:13:41 -0600, (Hobbes)
> wrote:
>
>>
> My own father would formally call 'warring' siblings to his study,
> which were known as 'closed door interviews' (CDI's), listen to each
> faction, and decide guilt or otherwise, together with any appropriate
> punishment warranted, on the evidence presented.
>
> It was a quite 'scary' experience, which worked wonderfully well, and
> I have no recollection of him ever resorting to any form of physical
> punishment.
>
So you passed out and never saw it coming, aye?

Charles
February 8th 05, 04:07 PM
On Tue, 08 Feb 2005 08:15:55 -0600, (Hobbes)
wrote:

>In article >, Charles
> wrote:
>
>> On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 22:13:41 -0600, (Hobbes)
>> wrote:
>>
>> >In article >, Donovan Rebbechi
>> > wrote:
>> >
>> >> An interesting approach to settling workplace disputes ...
>> >>
>> >> http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/06/nyregion/06homefront.html
>> >>
>> >> HOME FRONT
>> >> Trading Floor Rivals Settle Scores in Ring
>> >> By TANYA MOHN
>> >>
>> >> Published: February 6, 2005
>> >>
>> >> SHORTLY before sunrise on a recent Monday, four men arrived at the
>> >> Trinity Boxing Club in Lower Manhattan to jump rope, run on elliptical
>> >> trainers and shadow-box, finishing an intense training process: five
>> >> days a week for over a month, and twice a day for the previous two
>> >> weeks.
>> >>
>> >> They were not professional boxers, but colleagues on the floor of
>> >> the New York Stock Exchange. "After months of trash talking, they
>> >> decided to settle it in the ring," said Martin Snow, Trinity's
>> >> owner and manager. "It's going to be a barn burner."
>> >
>> >Nothing new about that. My old man used to put gloves on my brothers and I
>> >if we were having a spat, take us to the basement and let us settle our
>> >differences.
>>
>> That is a well-intentioned if misguided form of justice, given that
>> the biggest/strongest or best 'boxer' will always win the day, but
>> won't always be in the right.
>>
>> My own father would formally call 'warring' siblings to his study,
>> which were known as 'closed door interviews' (CDI's), listen to each
>> faction, and decide guilt or otherwise, together with any appropriate
>> punishment warranted, on the evidence presented.
>>
>> It was a quite 'scary' experience, which worked wonderfully well, and
>> I have no recollection of him ever resorting to any form of physical
>> punishment.
>>
>> Now school was very different ............
>
>You misunderstand. THis was only done if we were 'acting up' - having a
>spat. Not as a form of punishment at all, but simply to get us to burn off
>energy. If you've ever sparred as a kid with 20 oz gloves you'd know what
>I mean. It's like getting hit with a pillow. We'd whap each other a few
>times and then be giggling and laughing away. Half the time we'd end up
>pummelling on Dad.

I did "misunderstand" and apologise; he sounds like a great Dad, and
your family sounds much like my own, which was a fun family surrounded
by love and security.

>
>It was a great idea since my older brother was the same size as me anyhow.
>We had a hoot.
>
>Now, if it was a serious offense that required some form of justice, that
>was a different matter.

I know it well!! ;o)

Charles
February 8th 05, 04:22 PM
On 8 Feb 2005 07:34:46 -0800, wrote:

>
>Charles wrote:
>> On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 22:13:41 -0600, (Hobbes)
>> wrote:
>>
>>>
>> My own father would formally call 'warring' siblings to his study,
>> which were known as 'closed door interviews' (CDI's), listen to each
>> faction, and decide guilt or otherwise, together with any appropriate
>> punishment warranted, on the evidence presented.
>>
>> It was a quite 'scary' experience, which worked wonderfully well, and
>> I have no recollection of him ever resorting to any form of physical
>> punishment.
>>
>So you passed out and never saw it coming, aye?

I have actually suffered such a trauma while playing rugby, a quite
extraordinary experience.

I fell on a loose ball some years ago while playing on a rugby club
tour, and recovered consciousness some hours later in hospital, with
concussion and a badly broken nose.

It was a stray and unintentional boot apparently, and yes - "I never
saw it coming"!! ;o)

spodosaurus
February 8th 05, 04:30 PM
Charles wrote:

> "I never
> saw it coming"!! ;o)

Wasn't that the marketting slogan of the glow in the dark "stealth" condom?


--
spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. Complications in
hospital following this resulted in a serious illness. I now need a bone
marrow transplant. Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow
transplant, too. Please volunteer to be a marrow donor:
http://www.abmdr.org.au/
http://www.marrow.org/

February 8th 05, 04:43 PM
Yes, it is an experience.
The story: I was in a motorcycle accident and "lost" a day spent in
THE hospital
Although they said I was awake off & on and talking, I don't remember
anything
from the time I saw the car 'till I was totaly awake, which was the
next night.
I wonder if that has anything to do with why I can never remember where
I put my keys. Or my wallet.
Or...

Charles
February 8th 05, 04:56 PM
On Wed, 09 Feb 2005 00:30:58 +0800, spodosaurus
> wrote:

>Charles wrote:
>
>> "I never
>> saw it coming"!! ;o)
>
>Wasn't that the marketting slogan of the glow in the dark "stealth" condom?

What kind of "stealth" does a "glow in the dark" condom possess?
Surely the recipient could see that coming a mile away!! ;o)

tabber
February 8th 05, 04:59 PM
Charles wrote:
> On Wed, 09 Feb 2005 00:30:58 +0800, spodosaurus
> > wrote:
>
> >Charles wrote:
> >
> >> "I never
> >> saw it coming"!! ;o)
> >
> >Wasn't that the marketting slogan of the glow in the dark "stealth"
condom?
>
> What kind of "stealth" does a "glow in the dark" condom possess?
> Surely the recipient could see that coming a mile away!! ;o)

With Charles' dick size I doubt it. ;)

Charles
February 8th 05, 05:24 PM
On 8 Feb 2005 08:59:10 -0800, "tabber" > wrote:

>
>Charles wrote:
>> On Wed, 09 Feb 2005 00:30:58 +0800, spodosaurus
>> > wrote:
>>
>> >Charles wrote:
>> >
>> >> "I never
>> >> saw it coming"!! ;o)
>> >
>> >Wasn't that the marketting slogan of the glow in the dark "stealth"
>condom?
>>
>> What kind of "stealth" does a "glow in the dark" condom possess?
>> Surely the recipient could see that coming a mile away!! ;o)
>
>With Charles' dick size I doubt it. ;)

You wouldn't want it on the end of your nose as a wart Tabber!! ;o)

spodosaurus
February 8th 05, 06:27 PM
Charles wrote:
> On Wed, 09 Feb 2005 00:30:58 +0800, spodosaurus
> > wrote:
>
>
>>Charles wrote:
>>
>>
>>>"I never
>>>saw it coming"!! ;o)
>>
>>Wasn't that the marketting slogan of the glow in the dark "stealth" condom?
>
>
> What kind of "stealth" does a "glow in the dark" condom possess?
> Surely the recipient could see that coming a mile away!! ;o)
>

You're confusing what 'it' and 'coming' are referring to in the context
of that advertising slogan...

--
spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. Complications in
hospital following this resulted in a serious illness. I now need a bone
marrow transplant. Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow
transplant, too. Please volunteer to be a marrow donor:
http://www.abmdr.org.au/
http://www.marrow.org/

Charles
February 8th 05, 08:21 PM
On Wed, 09 Feb 2005 02:27:51 +0800, spodosaurus
> wrote:

>Charles wrote:
>> On Wed, 09 Feb 2005 00:30:58 +0800, spodosaurus
>> > wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Charles wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>"I never
>>>>saw it coming"!! ;o)
>>>
>>>Wasn't that the marketting slogan of the glow in the dark "stealth" condom?
>>
>>
>> What kind of "stealth" does a "glow in the dark" condom possess?
>> Surely the recipient could see that coming a mile away!! ;o)
>>
>
>You're confusing what 'it' and 'coming' are referring to in the context
>of that advertising slogan...

You're confusing me with someone who might have seen or heard that
advertising slogan........

spodosaurus
February 8th 05, 09:32 PM
Charles wrote:
> On Wed, 09 Feb 2005 02:27:51 +0800, spodosaurus
> > wrote:
>
>
>>Charles wrote:
>>
>>>On Wed, 09 Feb 2005 00:30:58 +0800, spodosaurus
> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>Charles wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>"I never
>>>>>saw it coming"!! ;o)
>>>>
>>>>Wasn't that the marketting slogan of the glow in the dark "stealth" condom?
>>>
>>>
>>>What kind of "stealth" does a "glow in the dark" condom possess?
>>>Surely the recipient could see that coming a mile away!! ;o)
>>>
>>
>>You're confusing what 'it' and 'coming' are referring to in the context
>>of that advertising slogan...
>
>
> You're confusing me with someone who might have seen or heard that
> advertising slogan........
>

you don't need to have heard the slogan to understand the meaning.

--
spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. Complications in
hospital following this resulted in a serious illness. I now need a bone
marrow transplant. Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow
transplant, too. Please volunteer to be a marrow donor:
http://www.abmdr.org.au/
http://www.marrow.org/

tabber
February 8th 05, 09:33 PM
Charles wrote:
> You wouldn't want it on the end of your nose as a wart Tabber!! ;o)

Touch=E9 Charles! Touch=E9!

Jolly good show my boy!

Charles
February 9th 05, 12:06 AM
On Wed, 09 Feb 2005 05:32:45 +0800, spodosaurus
> wrote:

>Charles wrote:
>> On Wed, 09 Feb 2005 02:27:51 +0800, spodosaurus
>> > wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Charles wrote:
>>>
>>>>On Wed, 09 Feb 2005 00:30:58 +0800, spodosaurus
> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Charles wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>"I never
>>>>>>saw it coming"!! ;o)
>>>>>
>>>>>Wasn't that the marketting slogan of the glow in the dark "stealth" condom?
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>What kind of "stealth" does a "glow in the dark" condom possess?
>>>>Surely the recipient could see that coming a mile away!! ;o)
>>>>
>>>
>>>You're confusing what 'it' and 'coming' are referring to in the context
>>>of that advertising slogan...
>>
>>
>> You're confusing me with someone who might have seen or heard that
>> advertising slogan........
>>
>
>you don't need to have heard the slogan to understand the meaning.

If there is a hidden meaning it can only be of a questionable origin,
which really is of no interest to me.........

Charles
February 9th 05, 12:08 AM
On 8 Feb 2005 13:33:30 -0800, "tabber" > wrote:

>
>Charles wrote:
>> You wouldn't want it on the end of your nose as a wart Tabber!! ;o)
>
>Touché Charles! Touché!
>
>Jolly good show my boy!

Dash it all Tabber, bugger me and stap me vitals, you sound like one
of us!! ;o)

Pat Styles
February 10th 05, 02:14 PM
"Hobbes" > wrote in message
...
> In article >, Fish! - of
> Arcadia. > wrote:
>
>> In article >,
>> says...
>> > In article >, Donovan Rebbechi
>> > > wrote:
>> >
>> > > An interesting approach to settling workplace disputes ...
>> > >
>> > > http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/06/nyregion/06homefront.html
>> > >
>> > > HOME FRONT
>> > > Trading Floor Rivals Settle Scores in Ring
>> > > By TANYA MOHN
>> > >
>> > > Published: February 6, 2005
>> > >
>> > > SHORTLY before sunrise on a recent Monday, four men arrived at the
>> > > Trinity Boxing Club in Lower Manhattan to jump rope, run on elliptical
>> > > trainers and shadow-box, finishing an intense training process: five
>> > > days a week for over a month, and twice a day for the previous two
>> > > weeks.
>> > >
>> > > They were not professional boxers, but colleagues on the floor of
>> > > the New York Stock Exchange. "After months of trash talking, they
>> > > decided to settle it in the ring," said Martin Snow, Trinity's
>> > > owner and manager. "It's going to be a barn burner."
>> >
>> > Nothing new about that. My old man used to put gloves on my brothers and I
>> > if we were having a spat, take us to the basement and let us settle our
>> > differences.
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>> How very kind.
>
> They were pretty big gloves, but you still learnt to get along with your
> brothers at a very young age.
>
> It's not a bad idea.

Darn tootin'!

> I used a variation with my kids. If they were acting
> up while we were travelling in the car I'd let them out to jog in front of
> the car for a mile or two.

Heh, that's a good one, too.
ps

T
February 10th 05, 05:41 PM
Hobbes wrote:


> It's not a bad idea. I used a variation with my kids. If they were acting
> up while we were travelling in the car I'd let them out to jog in front of
> the car for a mile or two.


Dad used to do that on road trips; pull over to the side of the highway,
get out of the car with me and my brother. Mom would drive to the next
rest stop. We'd jog there. A few miles would cool us right out.