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LurfysMa
June 5th 05, 09:55 PM
Is there any significant difference between a dumbbell shoulder press:

http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/DeltoidAnterior/DBShoulderPress.html

and a military press:

http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/DeltoidAnterior/BBMilitaryPress.html

?

BTW: Is this photo the correct form for the military press? I thought
in the military press the bar was lowered behind the neck...


--

SlicK
June 5th 05, 10:42 PM
"LurfysMa" > wrote in message
...
> Is there any significant difference between a dumbbell shoulder press:
>
> http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/DeltoidAnterior/DBShoulderPress.html
>
> and a military press:
>
> http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/DeltoidAnterior/BBMilitaryPress.html
>
> ?
>
> BTW: Is this photo the correct form for the military press? I thought
> in the military press the bar was lowered behind the neck...
>
>

They both work Mid-Overall Delts...

SlicK

Jeff Finlayson
June 6th 05, 12:14 AM
LurfysMa wrote:

> Is there any significant difference between a dumbbell shoulder press:
> http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/DeltoidAnterior/DBShoulderPress.html
>
> and a military press:
> http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/DeltoidAnterior/BBMilitaryPress.html
> ?

Slightly different, but not significantly different.

> BTW: Is this photo the correct form for the military press? I thought
> in the military press the bar was lowered behind the neck...

Yep, that's correct. Military press is a strict standing shoulder
press with the bar in front of the head. Strict as in standing at
attention.

What you describe is a behind the neck [shoulder] press.
http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/DeltoidAnterior/BBBehindNeckPress.html

Steve Freides
June 6th 05, 01:57 AM
"Jeff Finlayson" > wrote in message
...
> LurfysMa wrote:
>
>> Is there any significant difference between a dumbbell shoulder
>> press:
>> http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/DeltoidAnterior/DBShoulderPress.html
>>
>> and a military press:
>> http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/DeltoidAnterior/BBMilitaryPress.html
>> ?
>
> Slightly different, but not significantly different.
>
>> BTW: Is this photo the correct form for the military press? I thought
>> in the military press the bar was lowered behind the neck...
>
> Yep, that's correct. Military press is a strict standing shoulder
> press with the bar in front of the head. Strict as in standing at
> attention.
>
> What you describe is a behind the neck [shoulder] press.
> http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/DeltoidAnterior/BBBehindNeckPress.html

From what little I know of how the shoulder works, the description at
exrx.net of the behind the neck press as primarily working the anterior
deltoid doesn't seem right to me. I think the lateral deltoid is still
doing most of the work. I imagine the less flexible one's shoulders
are, the more work there is to do for the anterior deltoid, but I think
that's a relatively minor point.

Anyone?

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com

June 6th 05, 11:32 PM
On Sun, 5 Jun 2005 20:57:27 -0400, "Steve Freides"
> wrote:

>"Jeff Finlayson" > wrote in message
...
>> LurfysMa wrote:
>>
>>> Is there any significant difference between a dumbbell shoulder
>>> press:
>>> http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/DeltoidAnterior/DBShoulderPress.html
>>>
>>> and a military press:
>>> http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/DeltoidAnterior/BBMilitaryPress.html
>>> ?
>>
>> Slightly different, but not significantly different.
>>
>>> BTW: Is this photo the correct form for the military press? I thought
>>> in the military press the bar was lowered behind the neck...
>>
>> Yep, that's correct. Military press is a strict standing shoulder
>> press with the bar in front of the head. Strict as in standing at
>> attention.
>>
>> What you describe is a behind the neck [shoulder] press.
>> http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/DeltoidAnterior/BBBehindNeckPress.html
>
>From what little I know of how the shoulder works, the description at
>exrx.net of the behind the neck press as primarily working the anterior
>deltoid doesn't seem right to me. I think the lateral deltoid is still
>doing most of the work. I imagine the less flexible one's shoulders
>are, the more work there is to do for the anterior deltoid, but I think
>that's a relatively minor point.
>
>Anyone?
>
>-S-
>http://www.kbnj.com


Michael Yessis, Kinesiology of Exercise, pp. 178-179

"The shoulder muscles involved in this variant (Behind-the-neck-press)
are the middle and anterior deltoid and the supraspinatus. They
perform shoulder abduction, in which the arm moves from an out-to-the
sides position to an overhead position. In the shoulder girdle and
elbow joint the same muscles and actions occur as in Variant 1
(Military Press)

Variant 1- Military Press: In the shoulder joint the major muscles
are the anterior deltoid, the pectoralis major (upper portion), and
the coracobrachialis. They are involved in shoulder joint flexion in
which the upper arm travels in the anterior-posterior plane from a
position alongside the body to the front and upward to an overhead
position.

In the shoulder girdle the major muscles are the serratus anterior and
the upper and lower fibers of the trapezius. They are involved in
upward rotation of the scapulae, in which the right scapula turns
counterclockwise and the left scapula turns clockwise when viewed from
the rear. In addition, the scapulae are elevated (move directly
upward) during execution, which involves the uppermost trapezius and
the levator scapulae. In the elbow joint there is extension which
involves the triceps brachii. In theis action the forearm moves away
from the upper arm until the arms straighten."


Frederic Delavier, Strength Training Anatomy

Back Press

This exercise works the deltoids, particularly the medial part and the
upper trapezius, triceps, and serratus anterior. It also works the
rhomboids, infraspinatus, teres minor and supraspinatus. (p. 24)



Pavel Tsatsouline in Beyond Bodybuilding suggested a couple of options
to someone who complained that his neck and shoulders could no longer
take presses behind the neck (PBN).

One option is to do PBN using an OLY bar and working one shoulder at a
time. (A thick DB would be more likely to wrench one's shoulder back.)
The press is started with the elbow tucked into one's side as far back
as is comfortable. The bar should be as much in line with one's
shoulders as flexibility allows. As the bar passes the head, lean
forward slightly to get a tight contraction of the posterior delts and
the upper back muscles. (p. 215)