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OmManiPadmeOmelet
June 22nd 05, 06:25 PM
I have a close freind with a 12 year old son that weighs 150 lbs.
He is about 4' 8" at the moment so, needless to say, is quite obese.
He is only here for the summer and I'm trying to teach him all I can
while he is here.

He seems to be eager and really WANTS to lose weight, but is
also coming to realize that his wanting to constantly snack all day long
(on high starch foods mostly, as well as sugar laden foods) is a real
problem. He knows he will have some difficulty controlling it, but seems
to be willing to learn.

I'm trying to help him learn more about nutrition and better eating
habits so he can overhaul his lifestyle. He probably has a serious carb
addiction just like I did starting about the same age....

I think I can handle the diet end of it, but he is very interested in
weight lifting also. Lynn is going to be dropping him off at the Gym
next week early in the morning when I am there for my own workout.

I intend to teach him about intensity and concentration, and how and why
not to just try to show off and throw as much weight around as possible.
;-)

But, since he is a growing boy, I'm not sure _which_ excercizes would be
best for a boy his age.

Any suggestions, hints, references, would be most welcome! I will also
be doing some googling but if anyone has any experience training kids,
I'd be grateful.

When he goes back home this fall to his mom, his school does have a
weight room so he will be able to continue.

Thanks in advance!
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson

455
June 22nd 05, 07:30 PM
Teach him all you can, but it is pointless if when you are done he goes back
into a negative environment that will go against all your efforts put into
the situation. My advice, take his parents/guardians and shoot em for the
child abuse they have administered over the years.



>I have a close freind with a 12 year old son that weighs 150 lbs.
> He is about 4' 8" at the moment so, needless to say, is quite obese.
> He is only here for the summer and I'm trying to teach him all I can
> while he is here.
>
> He seems to be eager and really WANTS to lose weight, but is
> also coming to realize that his wanting to constantly snack all day long
> (on high starch foods mostly, as well as sugar laden foods) is a real
> problem. He knows he will have some difficulty controlling it, but seems
> to be willing to learn.
>
> I'm trying to help him learn more about nutrition and better eating
> habits so he can overhaul his lifestyle. He probably has a serious carb
> addiction just like I did starting about the same age....
>
> I think I can handle the diet end of it, but he is very interested in
> weight lifting also. Lynn is going to be dropping him off at the Gym
> next week early in the morning when I am there for my own workout.
>
> I intend to teach him about intensity and concentration, and how and why
> not to just try to show off and throw as much weight around as possible.
> ;-)
>
> But, since he is a growing boy, I'm not sure _which_ excercizes would be
> best for a boy his age.
>
> Any suggestions, hints, references, would be most welcome! I will also
> be doing some googling but if anyone has any experience training kids,
> I'd be grateful.
>
> When he goes back home this fall to his mom, his school does have a
> weight room so he will be able to continue.
>
> Thanks in advance!
> --
> Om.
>
> "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack
> Nicholson

Hobbes
June 22nd 05, 07:50 PM
In article >,
OmManiPadmeOmelet > wrote:

> I have a close freind with a 12 year old son that weighs 150 lbs.
> He is about 4' 8" at the moment so, needless to say, is quite obese.
> He is only here for the summer and I'm trying to teach him all I can
> while he is here.
>
> He seems to be eager and really WANTS to lose weight, but is
> also coming to realize that his wanting to constantly snack all day long
> (on high starch foods mostly, as well as sugar laden foods) is a real
> problem. He knows he will have some difficulty controlling it, but seems
> to be willing to learn.
>
> I'm trying to help him learn more about nutrition and better eating
> habits so he can overhaul his lifestyle. He probably has a serious carb
> addiction just like I did starting about the same age....
>
> I think I can handle the diet end of it, but he is very interested in
> weight lifting also. Lynn is going to be dropping him off at the Gym
> next week early in the morning when I am there for my own workout.
>
> I intend to teach him about intensity and concentration, and how and why
> not to just try to show off and throw as much weight around as possible.
> ;-)
>
> But, since he is a growing boy, I'm not sure _which_ excercizes would be
> best for a boy his age.
>
> Any suggestions, hints, references, would be most welcome! I will also
> be doing some googling but if anyone has any experience training kids,
> I'd be grateful.
>
> When he goes back home this fall to his mom, his school does have a
> weight room so he will be able to continue.
>
> Thanks in advance!

I'd really focus on bodyweight exercises and body control. If he can get
him thinking he can control how his body moves maybe he'll start to
think of controlling his intake.

So I'd go with the Royal Court as a base. Possibly add in some OH squats
with a dumbbell for weights. Press with a dumbbell.

I'd also teach him tumbling skills and other body control exercises. I
think these are excellent for developing body control and proprioceptive
skills. Shoulders rolls, somersaults, back somersaults, etc.

--
Keith

Steve Freides
June 22nd 05, 09:21 PM
"OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
...
>I have a close freind with a 12 year old son that weighs 150 lbs.
> He is about 4' 8" at the moment so, needless to say, is quite obese.
> He is only here for the summer and I'm trying to teach him all I can
> while he is here.
>
> He seems to be eager and really WANTS to lose weight, but is
> also coming to realize that his wanting to constantly snack all day
> long
> (on high starch foods mostly, as well as sugar laden foods) is a real
> problem. He knows he will have some difficulty controlling it, but
> seems
> to be willing to learn.
>
> I'm trying to help him learn more about nutrition and better eating
> habits so he can overhaul his lifestyle. He probably has a serious
> carb
> addiction just like I did starting about the same age....
>
> I think I can handle the diet end of it, but he is very interested in
> weight lifting also. Lynn is going to be dropping him off at the Gym
> next week early in the morning when I am there for my own workout.
>
> I intend to teach him about intensity and concentration, and how and
> why
> not to just try to show off and throw as much weight around as
> possible.
> ;-)
>
> But, since he is a growing boy, I'm not sure _which_ excercizes would
> be
> best for a boy his age.
>
> Any suggestions, hints, references, would be most welcome! I will
> also
> be doing some googling but if anyone has any experience training kids,
> I'd be grateful.
>
> When he goes back home this fall to his mom, his school does have a
> weight room so he will be able to continue.
>
> Thanks in advance!

Have you/he considered non-gym alternatives? Running is the classic
weight-losing exercise. A martial arts class might also work. It
depends on the child, of course, but I think offering him all sorts of
things to try is best. Soccer can be a great choice. Around here, we
have kids running club that does races every weekend in the Fall and
Spring and the kids in it adore it.

A word of advice on the diet issue - my oldest son, who is now twelve,
had a weight problem a couple of years ago - he basically put on some
weight, mostly belly fat, at around age 7 (right around the time he
started having to sit still in school all day) and when he was 10 or so,
he was pretty motivated to take it off. He kept asking me and my wife
for advice on how to lose weight, and we kept making suggestions but
none of them seemed to work for him. I finally looked at him one day
and said, "David, you need to learn to eat what you need, not what you
want." And the light bulb lit up, he started gradually dropping weight,
and after a year, he looked and felt great. That meant giving him
permission to not eat a lot sometimes, as well as allowing him to skip
meals sometimes, and included letting him eat junk some of the time.
He'd get on the scale every day, and that's a habit he's kept. Let's
just say he's not my body type in any way. :)

Good luck with it, whatever you decide.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com

June 22nd 05, 10:40 PM
video games will take off the pounds

before you go off

i'm not serious

June 22nd 05, 11:38 PM
Yeah definitely tumbling and bodyweight exercises. Take him to a rock
gym. Take him hiking. Conquering hills is great for confidence, so you
could take him on a easy-moderate hike and challenge him.

This is just my opinion but I see weightlifting as more advanced and
for people who heve never been active I think there are better ways to
start off. Have him, help you chop and stack wood if you live in the
country. Youre lucky he is driven to change his ways, many obese
youngsters simply dont have the motivation and for this they may spend
their lives overweight.

Weightlifting for people who have not been active much seems often to
them like a chore, so getting him active and habitually active first by
playing volleyball with him or taking him to play paintball or
something more fun may do better to get his foot in the fitness door so
to speak.

Oh and really condition him to recognize that his startch/carb
addiction is a key contrubutor to his obesity. Even if he cannot break
his addiction now, having someone he trusts telling him about his
addiction may help him examine his behaviouor farther doen the line
when he gets older and more serious about leading a healthier life.

Jeff
June 23rd 05, 01:44 AM
On Wed, 22 Jun 2005 12:50:31 -0600, Hobbes >
wrote:


>I'd really focus on bodyweight exercises and body control. If he can get
>him thinking he can control how his body moves maybe he'll start to
>think of controlling his intake.
>
>So I'd go with the Royal Court as a base. Possibly add in some OH squats
>with a dumbbell for weights. Press with a dumbbell.
>
>I'd also teach him tumbling skills and other body control exercises. I
>think these are excellent for developing body control and proprioceptive
>skills. Shoulders rolls, somersaults, back somersaults, etc.

I personally like this advice a lot. Not only will it be good
exercise and enhance body awareness as mentioned, but it will allow
him to transition into sports much easier as he gets into high school.
We all know many overweight youngsters get left out of school sports,
and unfortunately this can be socially devestating for some (not all)
teens. So what could be better than after losing the weight being
able to translate a lot of the skills and strength from the exercise
routine into a sport if he so chooses? The confidence value alone
would be worth it. Another poster mentioned martial arts which would
also be an excellent idea. The psychological discipline taught in
most arts would probalby carry over into his personal level of
discipline regarding eating habits and other types of self-control.

AK
June 23rd 05, 03:09 AM
Remember to keep them active to help burn calories, don't let him sit around
playing playstation. Also, remember that as he grow older he might grow out
of the babyfat. Teaching him nutrition will be key. That will counteract
any activity that you will do for him if he is eating fast food all the
time.

As far as the exercises go, I would keep it basic, going for sets of 10.
Start with one set and see how he takes to it. Try to utilize bodyweight
exercises and if you do any exercise with weight stay conservative and use
the basic exercises. Leg press, chest press, arm curl...start on machines
first then weights so they can develop a base of control for the weights.

AK
www.fitnessplanning.com

"OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
...
> I have a close freind with a 12 year old son that weighs 150 lbs.
> He is about 4' 8" at the moment so, needless to say, is quite obese.
> He is only here for the summer and I'm trying to teach him all I can
> while he is here.
>
> He seems to be eager and really WANTS to lose weight, but is
> also coming to realize that his wanting to constantly snack all day long
> (on high starch foods mostly, as well as sugar laden foods) is a real
> problem. He knows he will have some difficulty controlling it, but seems
> to be willing to learn.
>
> I'm trying to help him learn more about nutrition and better eating
> habits so he can overhaul his lifestyle. He probably has a serious carb
> addiction just like I did starting about the same age....
>
> I think I can handle the diet end of it, but he is very interested in
> weight lifting also. Lynn is going to be dropping him off at the Gym
> next week early in the morning when I am there for my own workout.
>
> I intend to teach him about intensity and concentration, and how and why
> not to just try to show off and throw as much weight around as possible.
> ;-)
>
> But, since he is a growing boy, I'm not sure _which_ excercizes would be
> best for a boy his age.
>
> Any suggestions, hints, references, would be most welcome! I will also
> be doing some googling but if anyone has any experience training kids,
> I'd be grateful.
>
> When he goes back home this fall to his mom, his school does have a
> weight room so he will be able to continue.
>
> Thanks in advance!
> --
> Om.
>
> "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack
Nicholson

John Hanson
June 23rd 05, 04:11 AM
On Wed, 22 Jun 2005 20:44:05 -0400, Jeff > wrote in
misc.fitness.weights:


>We all know many overweight youngsters get left out of school sports,
>and unfortunately this can be socially devestating for some (not all)
>teens.

Hell, I've always thought of that as a good thing. Peer pressure can
be good.

John Hanson
June 23rd 05, 04:29 AM
On Wed, 22 Jun 2005 12:25:41 -0500, OmManiPadmeOmelet
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

>I have a close freind with a 12 year old son that weighs 150 lbs.
>He is about 4' 8" at the moment so, needless to say, is quite obese.
>He is only here for the summer and I'm trying to teach him all I can
>while he is here.
>
Get him some weights and have him watch professional wrestling.
Worked for me but I was never fat as a kid. I was 5'6" and 125 pounds
when I was that age.

It was on AWA Allstar Wresting where I heard a wrestler talk about
powerlifting for the first time. I was already doing pushups, sit ups
and running sprints and his interview was the clincher. That and my
older sister had a boyfriend for a couple of months who was into
powerlifting. Of course, I got burnt out at 17 and quit for 19
years:-)

Who lets their kid get that fat?

Mack
June 23rd 05, 05:33 AM
"Jeff" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 22 Jun 2005 12:50:31 -0600, Hobbes >
> wrote:
>
>
>>I'd really focus on bodyweight exercises and body control. If he can get
>>him thinking he can control how his body moves maybe he'll start to
>>think of controlling his intake.
>>
>>So I'd go with the Royal Court as a base. Possibly add in some OH squats
>>with a dumbbell for weights. Press with a dumbbell.
>>
>>I'd also teach him tumbling skills and other body control exercises. I
>>think these are excellent for developing body control and proprioceptive
>>skills. Shoulders rolls, somersaults, back somersaults, etc.
>
> I personally like this advice a lot. Not only will it be good
> exercise and enhance body awareness as mentioned, but it will allow
> him to transition into sports much easier as he gets into high school.
> We all know many overweight youngsters get left out of school sports,
> and unfortunately this can be socially devestating for some (not all)
> teens. So what could be better than after losing the weight being
> able to translate a lot of the skills and strength from the exercise
> routine into a sport if he so chooses? The confidence value alone
> would be worth it. Another poster mentioned martial arts which would
> also be an excellent idea. The psychological discipline taught in
> most arts would probalby carry over into his personal level of
> discipline regarding eating habits and other types of self-control.


Respectfully disagree. Tumbling exercises can be very dangerous for
unathletic children. Personally know a kid who broke his neck from a forward
roll in gym class believe it or not. If your friend's kid breaks his neck or
gets hurt, it's on your head. In this litigious society, I wouldn't suggest
a damn thing that could possible hurt a child. So no running, no
freeweights, no swimming. You get the idea.

Mike
June 23rd 05, 05:37 AM
OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote in message ...
>I have a close freind with a 12 year old son that weighs 150 lbs.
>He is about 4' 8" at the moment so, needless to say, is quite obese.
>He is only here for the summer and I'm trying to teach him all I can
>while he is here.
>
>He seems to be eager and really WANTS to lose weight, but is
>also coming to realize that his wanting to constantly snack all day long
>(on high starch foods mostly, as well as sugar laden foods) is a real
>problem. He knows he will have some difficulty controlling it, but seems
>to be willing to learn.
>
>I'm trying to help him learn more about nutrition and better eating
>habits so he can overhaul his lifestyle. He probably has a serious carb
>addiction just like I did starting about the same age....
>
>I think I can handle the diet end of it, but he is very interested in
>weight lifting also. Lynn is going to be dropping him off at the Gym
>next week early in the morning when I am there for my own workout.
>
>I intend to teach him about intensity and concentration, and how and why
>not to just try to show off and throw as much weight around as possible.
>;-)
>
>But, since he is a growing boy, I'm not sure _which_ excercizes would be
>best for a boy his age.
>
>Any suggestions, hints, references, would be most welcome! I will also
>be doing some googling but if anyone has any experience training kids,
>I'd be grateful.
>
>When he goes back home this fall to his mom, his school does have a
>weight room so he will be able to continue.
>
>Thanks in advance!
>--
>Om.

If he's interested how about boxing or even better(in my humble opinion)
kickboxing. He will loose the weight fast, increase strength, fitness,
flexibility and improve confidence. Don't be fooled into thinking all
kickboxing gyms are full of rough heads because there are plenty out there
that encourage all ages and both males and females to enjoy theselves. Of
course a good gym will also have plenty of opportunities for competetion if
one chooses. Weight training is also available at the kickboxing gym.

Good luck
Mike

>
>"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack
Nicholson

OmManiPadmeOmelet
June 23rd 05, 06:38 AM
In article >,
Hobbes > wrote:

> In article >,
> OmManiPadmeOmelet > wrote:
>
> > I have a close freind with a 12 year old son that weighs 150 lbs.
> > He is about 4' 8" at the moment so, needless to say, is quite obese.
> > He is only here for the summer and I'm trying to teach him all I can
> > while he is here.
> >
> > He seems to be eager and really WANTS to lose weight, but is
> > also coming to realize that his wanting to constantly snack all day long
> > (on high starch foods mostly, as well as sugar laden foods) is a real
> > problem. He knows he will have some difficulty controlling it, but seems
> > to be willing to learn.
> >
> > I'm trying to help him learn more about nutrition and better eating
> > habits so he can overhaul his lifestyle. He probably has a serious carb
> > addiction just like I did starting about the same age....
> >
> > I think I can handle the diet end of it, but he is very interested in
> > weight lifting also. Lynn is going to be dropping him off at the Gym
> > next week early in the morning when I am there for my own workout.
> >
> > I intend to teach him about intensity and concentration, and how and why
> > not to just try to show off and throw as much weight around as possible.
> > ;-)
> >
> > But, since he is a growing boy, I'm not sure _which_ excercizes would be
> > best for a boy his age.
> >
> > Any suggestions, hints, references, would be most welcome! I will also
> > be doing some googling but if anyone has any experience training kids,
> > I'd be grateful.
> >
> > When he goes back home this fall to his mom, his school does have a
> > weight room so he will be able to continue.
> >
> > Thanks in advance!
>
> I'd really focus on bodyweight exercises and body control. If he can get
> him thinking he can control how his body moves maybe he'll start to
> think of controlling his intake.

Neat concept... :-)
One body builder picture I have in my locker at work says something to
the effect that when they started weight lifting, they realized that
they had control over their body. They are how they wished to be.

>
> So I'd go with the Royal Court as a base. Possibly add in some OH squats
> with a dumbbell for weights. Press with a dumbbell.

Dumbells are probably an excellent place to start.
I know he is no weakling. His dad has seen to that!

I watched him pick up and move a large haybail the other day and move it
with no trouble at all.

>
> I'd also teach him tumbling skills and other body control exercises. I
> think these are excellent for developing body control and proprioceptive
> skills. Shoulders rolls, somersaults, back somersaults, etc.

Um, well, Even _I_ can't do those yet! <lol>
I think he is a bit fat for that, but I'll see what he can do as soon as
I find out how flexible he is.
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson

OmManiPadmeOmelet
June 23rd 05, 06:42 AM
In article >,
"Steve Freides" > wrote:

> "OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
> ...
> >I have a close freind with a 12 year old son that weighs 150 lbs.
> > He is about 4' 8" at the moment so, needless to say, is quite obese.
> > He is only here for the summer and I'm trying to teach him all I can
> > while he is here.
> >
> > He seems to be eager and really WANTS to lose weight, but is
> > also coming to realize that his wanting to constantly snack all day
> > long
> > (on high starch foods mostly, as well as sugar laden foods) is a real
> > problem. He knows he will have some difficulty controlling it, but
> > seems
> > to be willing to learn.
> >
> > I'm trying to help him learn more about nutrition and better eating
> > habits so he can overhaul his lifestyle. He probably has a serious
> > carb
> > addiction just like I did starting about the same age....
> >
> > I think I can handle the diet end of it, but he is very interested in
> > weight lifting also. Lynn is going to be dropping him off at the Gym
> > next week early in the morning when I am there for my own workout.
> >
> > I intend to teach him about intensity and concentration, and how and
> > why
> > not to just try to show off and throw as much weight around as
> > possible.
> > ;-)
> >
> > But, since he is a growing boy, I'm not sure _which_ excercizes would
> > be
> > best for a boy his age.
> >
> > Any suggestions, hints, references, would be most welcome! I will
> > also
> > be doing some googling but if anyone has any experience training kids,
> > I'd be grateful.
> >
> > When he goes back home this fall to his mom, his school does have a
> > weight room so he will be able to continue.
> >
> > Thanks in advance!
>
> Have you/he considered non-gym alternatives? Running is the classic
> weight-losing exercise. A martial arts class might also work. It
> depends on the child, of course, but I think offering him all sorts of
> things to try is best. Soccer can be a great choice. Around here, we
> have kids running club that does races every weekend in the Fall and
> Spring and the kids in it adore it.

I've tried to get his parents to get him into martial arts, but so far
there has been zero interest. :-P

As for running, I spoke with him about that this morning.
His school has a track so I told him when he was done lifting to go and
fast walk for at least 20 minutes per day, or run if he could.

>
> A word of advice on the diet issue - my oldest son, who is now twelve,
> had a weight problem a couple of years ago - he basically put on some
> weight, mostly belly fat, at around age 7 (right around the time he
> started having to sit still in school all day) and when he was 10 or so,
> he was pretty motivated to take it off. He kept asking me and my wife
> for advice on how to lose weight, and we kept making suggestions but
> none of them seemed to work for him. I finally looked at him one day
> and said, "David, you need to learn to eat what you need, not what you
> want." And the light bulb lit up, he started gradually dropping weight,
> and after a year, he looked and felt great. That meant giving him
> permission to not eat a lot sometimes, as well as allowing him to skip
> meals sometimes, and included letting him eat junk some of the time.
> He'd get on the scale every day, and that's a habit he's kept. Let's
> just say he's not my body type in any way. :)

Hmmmmmm... neat statement! ;-)

I noted he wolfed his food so talked to him about taking smaller bites,
chewing thoroughly and slowing down. We discussed how eating too fast
did make him stuff himself more and made him feel ill. I told him the
why's about it and he is giving it a real try.

>
> Good luck with it, whatever you decide.
>
> -S-
> http://www.kbnj.com

Thank you!

>
>
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson

OmManiPadmeOmelet
June 23rd 05, 06:47 AM
In article . com>,
wrote:

> Yeah definitely tumbling and bodyweight exercises. Take him to a rock
> gym. Take him hiking. Conquering hills is great for confidence, so you
> could take him on a easy-moderate hike and challenge him.

If it was spring, I could. :-P
The days are hitting in the high 90's to lower 100's now.
I'm not sure how safe that would be!

>
> This is just my opinion but I see weightlifting as more advanced and
> for people who heve never been active I think there are better ways to
> start off. Have him, help you chop and stack wood if you live in the
> country. Youre lucky he is driven to change his ways, many obese
> youngsters simply dont have the motivation and for this they may spend
> their lives overweight.

:-) Good point.
He DOES like to show off, like hauling around that haybail when I
offered to move it for him!

For some reason, weights attract him. Might be the Body Building rags
(Muscular Development) that I leave laying around.

>
> Weightlifting for people who have not been active much seems often to
> them like a chore, so getting him active and habitually active first by
> playing volleyball with him or taking him to play paintball or
> something more fun may do better to get his foot in the fitness door so
> to speak.

I'll see what he thinks, but he seems to be very excited about coming to
the gym with me next week.

He told me today he could do 300 lbs. on the leg press at school.
Not sure if I believe him, but we shall see! At least a press sled is
safe but I'm not about to let him try that!

>
> Oh and really condition him to recognize that his startch/carb
> addiction is a key contrubutor to his obesity. Even if he cannot break
> his addiction now, having someone he trusts telling him about his
> addiction may help him examine his behaviouor farther doen the line
> when he gets older and more serious about leading a healthier life.

Oh yes!
That concept has been being drilled into him now for the past 2 weeks!
Lynn, his stepmom, is going for it all the way and trying to help him
control it. I sent him home today after Lynn was done cleaning here with
a couple of boxes of sugar free Jello. If he is going to give in to
snacking, he needs to try less calorie dense foods.

Fortunately, he LIKES green veggies.

>
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson

OmManiPadmeOmelet
June 23rd 05, 06:50 AM
In article >,
Jeff > wrote:

> On Wed, 22 Jun 2005 12:50:31 -0600, Hobbes >
> wrote:
>
>
> >I'd really focus on bodyweight exercises and body control. If he can get
> >him thinking he can control how his body moves maybe he'll start to
> >think of controlling his intake.
> >
> >So I'd go with the Royal Court as a base. Possibly add in some OH squats
> >with a dumbbell for weights. Press with a dumbbell.
> >
> >I'd also teach him tumbling skills and other body control exercises. I
> >think these are excellent for developing body control and proprioceptive
> >skills. Shoulders rolls, somersaults, back somersaults, etc.
>
> I personally like this advice a lot. Not only will it be good
> exercise and enhance body awareness as mentioned, but it will allow
> him to transition into sports much easier as he gets into high school.
> We all know many overweight youngsters get left out of school sports,
> and unfortunately this can be socially devestating for some (not all)
> teens. So what could be better than after losing the weight being
> able to translate a lot of the skills and strength from the exercise
> routine into a sport if he so chooses? The confidence value alone
> would be worth it. Another poster mentioned martial arts which would
> also be an excellent idea. The psychological discipline taught in
> most arts would probalby carry over into his personal level of
> discipline regarding eating habits and other types of self-control.

I think I'll try some Yoga with him after we are done with the weights.
I stretch when I am all done for flexibility, then we can go from there.
I remember how thrilled I was when I found I had the torso strength to
be able to do a yoga headstand! I can't do one right now, but anticipate
that I will in about another year.


There is no feeling as good as knowing you have more control over your
body IMHO.
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson

OmManiPadmeOmelet
June 23rd 05, 06:56 AM
In article >,
"AK" > wrote:

> Remember to keep them active to help burn calories, don't let him sit around
> playing playstation. Also, remember that as he grow older he might grow out
> of the babyfat. Teaching him nutrition will be key. That will counteract
> any activity that you will do for him if he is eating fast food all the
> time.

I think it's more than just baby fat at this point. <G>
I've known this kid now for nearly 3 years and he is finally getting
interested in doing something about his problem.

His voice has not broken yet, but I noted today that his arms are pretty
hairy, and he is getting armpit fuzz so that means his Testosterone is
beginning to kick in, so he will probably do well.

>
> As far as the exercises go, I would keep it basic, going for sets of 10.
> Start with one set and see how he takes to it. Try to utilize bodyweight
> exercises and if you do any exercise with weight stay conservative and use
> the basic exercises. Leg press, chest press, arm curl...start on machines
> first then weights so they can develop a base of control for the weights.
>
> AK
> www.fitnessplanning.com

That was the plan, thanks! ;-)
I was going to go for squats with dumbells first, and maybe with just
the olympic bar, no added plates. We'll start out light, 3 sets of 10
and see how much weight he can do.

I'll also have a ring binder for him to keep a journal.

Incline press, squats and deadlifts with proper posture,
then some of the many machines in there. Abs are a given as well!

I'm dubious about isolation lifts at this point. The arms get worked
plenty hard with just the basic stuff, including some rows for back.
Rows also work the shoulders well. Core moves, overall full body type
stuff.

I don't want to discourage him by having him too sore after one good
workout!

Does that sound ok?

>
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson

OmManiPadmeOmelet
June 23rd 05, 06:58 AM
In article >,
John Hanson > wrote:

> On Wed, 22 Jun 2005 12:25:41 -0500, OmManiPadmeOmelet
> > wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>
> >I have a close freind with a 12 year old son that weighs 150 lbs.
> >He is about 4' 8" at the moment so, needless to say, is quite obese.
> >He is only here for the summer and I'm trying to teach him all I can
> >while he is here.
> >
> Get him some weights and have him watch professional wrestling.
> Worked for me but I was never fat as a kid. I was 5'6" and 125 pounds
> when I was that age.

Y'know, he is short, squat and broad of build.
I'd bet he'd make an excellent wrestler!
I'll ask him about that and see if the school offers it.

>
> It was on AWA Allstar Wresting where I heard a wrestler talk about
> powerlifting for the first time. I was already doing pushups, sit ups
> and running sprints and his interview was the clincher. That and my
> older sister had a boyfriend for a couple of months who was into
> powerlifting. Of course, I got burnt out at 17 and quit for 19
> years:-)
>
> Who lets their kid get that fat?

Ignorant people... <sigh>
I talked to him today about school lunches, and they are indeed crap.

How sad.

I'm trying to get him to consider bagging it.

>
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson

OmManiPadmeOmelet
June 23rd 05, 06:59 AM
In article <[email protected]>,
"Mack" > wrote:

> Respectfully disagree. Tumbling exercises can be very dangerous for
> unathletic children. Personally know a kid who broke his neck from a forward
> roll in gym class believe it or not. If your friend's kid breaks his neck or
> gets hurt, it's on your head. In this litigious society, I wouldn't suggest
> a damn thing that could possible hurt a child. So no running, no
> freeweights, no swimming. You get the idea.
>
>

<lol> Yeah, I kinda thought about that as well.
For a fat, fairly out of shape kid, he'd need to do a LOT of work before
tumbling etc. would be safe and feasable.

I took that advice with a bit of caution...
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson

OmManiPadmeOmelet
June 23rd 05, 07:01 AM
In article >,
"Mike" > wrote:


> If he's interested how about boxing or even better(in my humble opinion)
> kickboxing. He will loose the weight fast, increase strength, fitness,
> flexibility and improve confidence. Don't be fooled into thinking all
> kickboxing gyms are full of rough heads because there are plenty out there
> that encourage all ages and both males and females to enjoy theselves. Of
> course a good gym will also have plenty of opportunities for competetion if
> one chooses. Weight training is also available at the kickboxing gym.
>
> Good luck
> Mike
>

We'd have to find a Dojo.
This is not a very well off family, so that might not be possible at
this point in time. Maybe down the road a bit!
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson

OmManiPadmeOmelet
June 23rd 05, 07:03 AM
In article >,
"455" > wrote:

> Teach him all you can, but it is pointless if when you are done he goes back
> into a negative environment that will go against all your efforts put into
> the situation. My advice, take his parents/guardians and shoot em for the
> child abuse they have administered over the years.

Heh, I'm hoping to motivate him enough to continue on his own.
I know his mother is not going to be that supportive! I wish he could
just stay here with his father...... <sigh>

He's a pretty bright kid, so I'll just hope for the best and see what
happens!

Heck, he'd never even touched a gun until the weekend before last, and
once he fired his dad's 30-30 deer rifle, he decided he liked it. ;-)

He's all boy, despite his obesity.

Wish me luck!
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson

OmManiPadmeOmelet
June 23rd 05, 07:04 AM
In article . com>,
wrote:

> video games will take off the pounds
>
> before you go off
>
> i'm not serious
>

Duh......... ;-)
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson

Steve Freides
June 23rd 05, 01:10 PM
"John Hanson" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 22 Jun 2005 20:44:05 -0400, Jeff > wrote in
> misc.fitness.weights:
>
>
>>We all know many overweight youngsters get left out of school sports,
>>and unfortunately this can be socially devestating for some (not all)
>>teens.
>
> Hell, I've always thought of that as a good thing. Peer pressure can
> be good.

Peer pressure is what made it work for my son. His friends started
calling him 'fatty' and things like that. Funny thing was that he was
never a lot overweight - maybe 10 lbs or so in 4th grade, the equivalent
of 15 or 20 lbs. overweight in an adult, and certainly nowhere near
obesity. I think part of the dynamic in my son's case was that he felt
self-conscious about his belly and his friends picked up on that and
started teasing him about it.

Anyway, the peer pressure worked and that was a good thing.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com

John Hanson
June 23rd 05, 01:55 PM
On Thu, 23 Jun 2005 00:58:10 -0500, OmManiPadmeOmelet
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

>In article >,
> John Hanson > wrote:
>
>> On Wed, 22 Jun 2005 12:25:41 -0500, OmManiPadmeOmelet
>> > wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>>
>> >I have a close freind with a 12 year old son that weighs 150 lbs.
>> >He is about 4' 8" at the moment so, needless to say, is quite obese.
>> >He is only here for the summer and I'm trying to teach him all I can
>> >while he is here.
>> >
>> Get him some weights and have him watch professional wrestling.
>> Worked for me but I was never fat as a kid. I was 5'6" and 125 pounds
>> when I was that age.
>
>Y'know, he is short, squat and broad of build.
>I'd bet he'd make an excellent wrestler!
>I'll ask him about that and see if the school offers it.

So am I. I only grew 3 inches but have gained 100 pounds.

>
>>
>> It was on AWA Allstar Wresting where I heard a wrestler talk about
>> powerlifting for the first time. I was already doing pushups, sit ups
>> and running sprints and his interview was the clincher. That and my
>> older sister had a boyfriend for a couple of months who was into
>> powerlifting. Of course, I got burnt out at 17 and quit for 19
>> years:-)
>>
>> Who lets their kid get that fat?
>
>Ignorant people... <sigh>
>I talked to him today about school lunches, and they are indeed crap.
>
>How sad.
>
>I'm trying to get him to consider bagging it.
>
>>
Our lunches used to be pretty good. Don't know about now though.
There were days in high school (back when I was a 165 pounder) that
I'd eat 3 of them with about 6 little cartons (8 ounces I think) of
milk. I was probably less than 10% bodyfat at the time too.

OmManiPadmeOmelet
June 23rd 05, 03:35 PM
In article >,
John Hanson > wrote:

> On Thu, 23 Jun 2005 00:58:10 -0500, OmManiPadmeOmelet
> > wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>
> >In article >,
> > John Hanson > wrote:
> >
> >> On Wed, 22 Jun 2005 12:25:41 -0500, OmManiPadmeOmelet
> >> > wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
> >>
> >> >I have a close freind with a 12 year old son that weighs 150 lbs.
> >> >He is about 4' 8" at the moment so, needless to say, is quite obese.
> >> >He is only here for the summer and I'm trying to teach him all I can
> >> >while he is here.
> >> >
> >> Get him some weights and have him watch professional wrestling.
> >> Worked for me but I was never fat as a kid. I was 5'6" and 125 pounds
> >> when I was that age.
> >
> >Y'know, he is short, squat and broad of build.
> >I'd bet he'd make an excellent wrestler!
> >I'll ask him about that and see if the school offers it.
>
> So am I. I only grew 3 inches but have gained 100 pounds.

Personally, as big and impressive as the tall body builders are, I think
the shorter guys are more aesthetically pleasing.

Lee Labrada comes to mind. ;-)

>
> >
> >>
> >> It was on AWA Allstar Wresting where I heard a wrestler talk about
> >> powerlifting for the first time. I was already doing pushups, sit ups
> >> and running sprints and his interview was the clincher. That and my
> >> older sister had a boyfriend for a couple of months who was into
> >> powerlifting. Of course, I got burnt out at 17 and quit for 19
> >> years:-)
> >>
> >> Who lets their kid get that fat?
> >
> >Ignorant people... <sigh>
> >I talked to him today about school lunches, and they are indeed crap.
> >
> >How sad.
> >
> >I'm trying to get him to consider bagging it.
> >
> >>
> Our lunches used to be pretty good. Don't know about now though.
> There were days in high school (back when I was a 165 pounder) that
> I'd eat 3 of them with about 6 little cartons (8 ounces I think) of
> milk. I was probably less than 10% bodyfat at the time too.

Well, now they have this attitude "we have to serve something the kids
will eat". Pop tarts for breakfast, lunches of breaded, deep fried crap,
french fries, _chocolate_ milk! (Ben specifically asked if he could
still keep drinking chocolate milk.....) <sigh>

See?
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson

Steve Freides
June 23rd 05, 04:15 PM
"OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> John Hanson > wrote:
>
>> On Thu, 23 Jun 2005 00:58:10 -0500, OmManiPadmeOmelet
>> > wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>>
>> >In article >,
>> > John Hanson > wrote:
>> >
>> >> On Wed, 22 Jun 2005 12:25:41 -0500, OmManiPadmeOmelet
>> >> > wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>> >>
>> >> >I have a close freind with a 12 year old son that weighs 150 lbs.
>> >> >He is about 4' 8" at the moment so, needless to say, is quite
>> >> >obese.
>> >> >He is only here for the summer and I'm trying to teach him all I
>> >> >can
>> >> >while he is here.
>> >> >
>> >> Get him some weights and have him watch professional wrestling.
>> >> Worked for me but I was never fat as a kid. I was 5'6" and 125
>> >> pounds
>> >> when I was that age.
>> >
>> >Y'know, he is short, squat and broad of build.
>> >I'd bet he'd make an excellent wrestler!
>> >I'll ask him about that and see if the school offers it.
>>
>> So am I. I only grew 3 inches but have gained 100 pounds.
>
> Personally, as big and impressive as the tall body builders are, I
> think
> the shorter guys are more aesthetically pleasing.
>
> Lee Labrada comes to mind. ;-)
>
>>
>> >
>> >>
>> >> It was on AWA Allstar Wresting where I heard a wrestler talk about
>> >> powerlifting for the first time. I was already doing pushups, sit
>> >> ups
>> >> and running sprints and his interview was the clincher. That and
>> >> my
>> >> older sister had a boyfriend for a couple of months who was into
>> >> powerlifting. Of course, I got burnt out at 17 and quit for 19
>> >> years:-)
>> >>
>> >> Who lets their kid get that fat?
>> >
>> >Ignorant people... <sigh>
>> >I talked to him today about school lunches, and they are indeed
>> >crap.
>> >
>> >How sad.
>> >
>> >I'm trying to get him to consider bagging it.
>> >
>> >>
>> Our lunches used to be pretty good. Don't know about now though.
>> There were days in high school (back when I was a 165 pounder) that
>> I'd eat 3 of them with about 6 little cartons (8 ounces I think) of
>> milk. I was probably less than 10% bodyfat at the time too.
>
> Well, now they have this attitude "we have to serve something the kids
> will eat". Pop tarts for breakfast, lunches of breaded, deep fried
> crap,
> french fries, _chocolate_ milk! (Ben specifically asked if he could
> still keep drinking chocolate milk.....) <sigh>

School lunches are changing. More than a few schools and school
districts have stopped serving junk food and I was just reading the
other day that New Jersey, where I live, recently passed legislation
that makes this change state-wide as of September, 2007.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com


> See?
> --
> Om.
>
> "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack
> Nicholson

rick++
June 23rd 05, 04:24 PM
I recommend finding an exercise that is most fun to him
so he can keep up the enthusiasm.
For some it might be something individual & self-paced.
Others like company and competitive.
At tjis age I would mind if they change exercise or sport
every few months, as long as they are active.

455
June 23rd 05, 04:24 PM
One major problem in society today is fat breeding fat, please for the sake
of mankind do whatever you can. The world will thank you.


>> I know his mother is not going to be that supportive!

455
June 23rd 05, 04:35 PM
> Who lets their kid get that fat?

I don't know but it is a fuc**ng epidemic so much to the point that the fit
and health conscious are beginning to be looked at in funny ways. We are
conceded, self adsorbed, we all want to be Arnold. Sorry if I feel like a
million bucks after a good workout and a tuna salad, should I just blend in
with the masses in the drive thru? Thank god that where I live they have a
no smoking in bars/restaurants law, I just wish we could come up with some
type of law/regulation so when I take my kids out in public we are not
plagued with the disgust of having to be in company with such abominations.

OmManiPadmeOmelet
June 23rd 05, 06:58 PM
In article >,
"Steve Freides" > wrote:

> "OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
> ...
> > In article >,
> > John Hanson > wrote:
> >
> >> On Thu, 23 Jun 2005 00:58:10 -0500, OmManiPadmeOmelet
> >> > wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
> >>
> >> >In article >,
> >> > John Hanson > wrote:
> >> >
> >> >> On Wed, 22 Jun 2005 12:25:41 -0500, OmManiPadmeOmelet
> >> >> > wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
> >> >>
> >> >> >I have a close freind with a 12 year old son that weighs 150 lbs.
> >> >> >He is about 4' 8" at the moment so, needless to say, is quite
> >> >> >obese.
> >> >> >He is only here for the summer and I'm trying to teach him all I
> >> >> >can
> >> >> >while he is here.
> >> >> >
> >> >> Get him some weights and have him watch professional wrestling.
> >> >> Worked for me but I was never fat as a kid. I was 5'6" and 125
> >> >> pounds
> >> >> when I was that age.
> >> >
> >> >Y'know, he is short, squat and broad of build.
> >> >I'd bet he'd make an excellent wrestler!
> >> >I'll ask him about that and see if the school offers it.
> >>
> >> So am I. I only grew 3 inches but have gained 100 pounds.
> >
> > Personally, as big and impressive as the tall body builders are, I
> > think
> > the shorter guys are more aesthetically pleasing.
> >
> > Lee Labrada comes to mind. ;-)
> >
> >>
> >> >
> >> >>
> >> >> It was on AWA Allstar Wresting where I heard a wrestler talk about
> >> >> powerlifting for the first time. I was already doing pushups, sit
> >> >> ups
> >> >> and running sprints and his interview was the clincher. That and
> >> >> my
> >> >> older sister had a boyfriend for a couple of months who was into
> >> >> powerlifting. Of course, I got burnt out at 17 and quit for 19
> >> >> years:-)
> >> >>
> >> >> Who lets their kid get that fat?
> >> >
> >> >Ignorant people... <sigh>
> >> >I talked to him today about school lunches, and they are indeed
> >> >crap.
> >> >
> >> >How sad.
> >> >
> >> >I'm trying to get him to consider bagging it.
> >> >
> >> >>
> >> Our lunches used to be pretty good. Don't know about now though.
> >> There were days in high school (back when I was a 165 pounder) that
> >> I'd eat 3 of them with about 6 little cartons (8 ounces I think) of
> >> milk. I was probably less than 10% bodyfat at the time too.
> >
> > Well, now they have this attitude "we have to serve something the kids
> > will eat". Pop tarts for breakfast, lunches of breaded, deep fried
> > crap,
> > french fries, _chocolate_ milk! (Ben specifically asked if he could
> > still keep drinking chocolate milk.....) <sigh>
>
> School lunches are changing. More than a few schools and school
> districts have stopped serving junk food and I was just reading the
> other day that New Jersey, where I live, recently passed legislation
> that makes this change state-wide as of September, 2007.
>
> -S-

Well, it's a start. ;-)
Why wait until 2007 tho'?

What's wrong with now???
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson

OmManiPadmeOmelet
June 23rd 05, 07:03 PM
Trust me. ;-)
I plan to try!

I don't know if his mom is obese or not, I've never met her.
I s'pose I could ask the kid.

His stepmom is a bitty little slender thing, so she is more than happy
to try to help any way she can.

This woman is so tiny, I bought her a kimono at the oriental market for
her birthday. Those kimonos are TINY! Even their "large" size would be a
petite for most american women. Chinese are little.

It was too big for her.......


In article >,
"455" > wrote:

> One major problem in society today is fat breeding fat, please for the sake
> of mankind do whatever you can. The world will thank you.
>
>
> >> I know his mother is not going to be that supportive!
>
>
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson

spodosaurus
June 23rd 05, 07:08 PM
OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

> As for running, I spoke with him about that this morning.
> His school has a track so I told him when he was done lifting to go and
> fast walk for at least 20 minutes per day, or run if he could.

Walking is great. I remember walking for hours as a teenager listening
to my walkman before I got into running. I kept my running time to an
hour or less per day, though, so on rest days I still went for nice long
walks.


--
spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. Complications in
hospital following this resulted in a serious illness. I now need a bone
marrow transplant. Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow
transplant, too. Please volunteer to be a marrow donor:
http://www.abmdr.org.au/
http://www.marrow.org/

OmManiPadmeOmelet
June 23rd 05, 07:17 PM
In article >,
spodosaurus > wrote:

> OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
>
> > As for running, I spoke with him about that this morning.
> > His school has a track so I told him when he was done lifting to go and
> > fast walk for at least 20 minutes per day, or run if he could.
>
> Walking is great. I remember walking for hours as a teenager listening
> to my walkman before I got into running. I kept my running time to an
> hour or less per day, though, so on rest days I still went for nice long
> walks.

Hmmmmmmm... I wonder.

I-pods are getting pretty cheap now. I know they could not buy one, but
one as a gift might be a good thing. I've got 9 _days_ worth of music in
this beast of mine (about 17 gigs worth) so he and I could pick and
choose a large number of songs that he would like.

Might be incentive. ;-)
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson

Steve Freides
June 23rd 05, 07:51 PM
"OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> "Steve Freides" > wrote:
>
>> "OmManiPadmeOmelet" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> > In article >,
>> > John Hanson > wrote:
>> >
>> >> On Thu, 23 Jun 2005 00:58:10 -0500, OmManiPadmeOmelet
>> >> > wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>> >>
>> >> >In article >,
>> >> > John Hanson > wrote:
>> >> >
>> >> >> On Wed, 22 Jun 2005 12:25:41 -0500, OmManiPadmeOmelet
>> >> >> > wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>> >> >>
>> >> >> >I have a close freind with a 12 year old son that weighs 150
>> >> >> >lbs.
>> >> >> >He is about 4' 8" at the moment so, needless to say, is quite
>> >> >> >obese.
>> >> >> >He is only here for the summer and I'm trying to teach him all
>> >> >> >I
>> >> >> >can
>> >> >> >while he is here.
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> Get him some weights and have him watch professional wrestling.
>> >> >> Worked for me but I was never fat as a kid. I was 5'6" and 125
>> >> >> pounds
>> >> >> when I was that age.
>> >> >
>> >> >Y'know, he is short, squat and broad of build.
>> >> >I'd bet he'd make an excellent wrestler!
>> >> >I'll ask him about that and see if the school offers it.
>> >>
>> >> So am I. I only grew 3 inches but have gained 100 pounds.
>> >
>> > Personally, as big and impressive as the tall body builders are, I
>> > think
>> > the shorter guys are more aesthetically pleasing.
>> >
>> > Lee Labrada comes to mind. ;-)
>> >
>> >>
>> >> >
>> >> >>
>> >> >> It was on AWA Allstar Wresting where I heard a wrestler talk
>> >> >> about
>> >> >> powerlifting for the first time. I was already doing pushups,
>> >> >> sit
>> >> >> ups
>> >> >> and running sprints and his interview was the clincher. That
>> >> >> and
>> >> >> my
>> >> >> older sister had a boyfriend for a couple of months who was
>> >> >> into
>> >> >> powerlifting. Of course, I got burnt out at 17 and quit for 19
>> >> >> years:-)
>> >> >>
>> >> >> Who lets their kid get that fat?
>> >> >
>> >> >Ignorant people... <sigh>
>> >> >I talked to him today about school lunches, and they are indeed
>> >> >crap.
>> >> >
>> >> >How sad.
>> >> >
>> >> >I'm trying to get him to consider bagging it.
>> >> >
>> >> >>
>> >> Our lunches used to be pretty good. Don't know about now though.
>> >> There were days in high school (back when I was a 165 pounder)
>> >> that
>> >> I'd eat 3 of them with about 6 little cartons (8 ounces I think)
>> >> of
>> >> milk. I was probably less than 10% bodyfat at the time too.
>> >
>> > Well, now they have this attitude "we have to serve something the
>> > kids
>> > will eat". Pop tarts for breakfast, lunches of breaded, deep fried
>> > crap,
>> > french fries, _chocolate_ milk! (Ben specifically asked if he could
>> > still keep drinking chocolate milk.....) <sigh>
>>
>> School lunches are changing. More than a few schools and school
>> districts have stopped serving junk food and I was just reading the
>> other day that New Jersey, where I live, recently passed legislation
>> that makes this change state-wide as of September, 2007.
>>
>> -S-
>
> Well, it's a start. ;-)
> Why wait until 2007 tho'?
>
> What's wrong with now???

You know, politics and all that. I'm sure someone's pocketbook is
bothered by the law, so they have to give them plenty of time to adapt.
Nothing unusual in the timing.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com


> --
> Om.
>
> "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack
> Nicholson

spodosaurus
June 23rd 05, 08:00 PM
OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
> In article >,
> spodosaurus > wrote:
>
>
>>OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
>>
>>
>>>As for running, I spoke with him about that this morning.
>>>His school has a track so I told him when he was done lifting to go and
>>>fast walk for at least 20 minutes per day, or run if he could.
>>
>>Walking is great. I remember walking for hours as a teenager listening
>>to my walkman before I got into running. I kept my running time to an
>>hour or less per day, though, so on rest days I still went for nice long
>>walks.
>
>
> Hmmmmmmm... I wonder.
>
> I-pods are getting pretty cheap now. I know they could not buy one, but
> one as a gift might be a good thing. I've got 9 _days_ worth of music in
> this beast of mine (about 17 gigs worth) so he and I could pick and
> choose a large number of songs that he would like.
>
> Might be incentive. ;-)

I-pods are still pretty expensive over here (and over there, too, with
an i-pod shuffle 512mb still going for $100). You could get something
less expensive, such as a creative muvo TX 512mb with FM radio for $85
(it's what I currently use). But yeah, set a minimum goal for him to
take it home with him at the end of the summer. Enough to make him
develop a habit of exercise, but not so much that it seems daunting, and
help him make that goal by going with him on walks etc.

Ari

--
spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. Complications in
hospital following this resulted in a serious illness. I now need a bone
marrow transplant. Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow
transplant, too. Please volunteer to be a marrow donor:
http://www.abmdr.org.au/
http://www.marrow.org/

Runs With Knives
June 23rd 05, 08:36 PM
In article >,
John Hanson > writes:
[snip]
> Our lunches used to be pretty good.

So were ours. IIRC: One a week a not-so-good food alternative was
offered. Something like pizza. The rest of the week it was balanced
diet stuff. And you didn't serve yourself--you were served by
cafeteria staff. I don't recall the average fare as being much
different from what mom served at home. (Not as tasty, of course
:).)

> Don't know about now though.
[snip]

Lots of junk food, I understand. Snack and soda-pop vending machines
too. But the obesity problem is finally getting some real attention,
and the schools are being forced to clean up their nutrition act.

Dunno how much good it'll do if mom & dad don't provide/enforce
healthy nutrition habits at home, tho.

--
Jim Seymour | "It is wrong always, everywhere and
WARNING: The "From:" address is a | for everyone to believe anything upon
spam trap. DON'T USE IT! Use: | insufficient evidence."
| - W. K. Clifford, ca. 1876

Runs With Knives
June 23rd 05, 08:38 PM
In article >,
OmManiPadmeOmelet > writes:
> In article >,
> "Steve Freides" > wrote:
[snip]
>>
>> School lunches are changing. More than a few schools and school
>> districts have stopped serving junk food and I was just reading the
>> other day that New Jersey, where I live, recently passed legislation
>> that makes this change state-wide as of September, 2007.
>>
>> -S-
>
> Well, it's a start. ;-)
> Why wait until 2007 tho'?
>
> What's wrong with now???

Contracts? Having to (re-)train cafeteria staff on how to prepare
and serve balanced, nutritious meals?

--
Jim Seymour | "It is wrong always, everywhere and
WARNING: The "From:" address is a | for everyone to believe anything upon
spam trap. DON'T USE IT! Use: | insufficient evidence."
| - W. K. Clifford, ca. 1876

Runs With Knives
June 23rd 05, 08:44 PM
In article >,
OmManiPadmeOmelet > writes:
[snip]
> Thing is, he does NOT like to be outside in the hot sun,
> so outdoor sports are pretty much out! I think that is why he is
> interested in weights. He gets to stay in air conditioning that way...

You know, as I became increasingly out-of-shape these last few years,
I, too, found heat, humidity and sun increasingly uncomfortable. I
recall thinking to myself "Funny, I used to *love* hot weather." Now
that I'm getting in shape again, I'm finding hot weather more
enjoyable--or at least not so noticeable.

--
Jim Seymour | "It is wrong always, everywhere and
WARNING: The "From:" address is a | for everyone to believe anything upon
spam trap. DON'T USE IT! Use: | insufficient evidence."
| - W. K. Clifford, ca. 1876

ray miller
June 23rd 05, 09:38 PM
>Neat concept... :-)
>One body builder picture I have in my locker at work says something to
>the effect that when they started weight lifting, they realized that
>they had control over their body. They are how they wished to be.

learn how to juggle with him. Great for persistence and control, and
no chance of hurting him/yourself until you start juggling chainsaws.
Good cardio too amd a neat party trick. If he gets good he can teach
all the kids at school.
3 balls is easy, 4 is difficult, 5 is circus class, more than that is
next to impossible.

Ray

OmManiPadmeOmelet
June 24th 05, 06:41 PM
Many thanks to all that answered. :-)
It's been very helpful!

Ben is very excited about his trip to the gym with me
and if this works out, I'll try to get Lynn to bring
him by more this summer, especially if I do end up
getting put on midnight shifts.

Those work well since I stop at the gym on the way home
from work, and Lynn is a morning person!

Wish me luck!

Cheers!
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson