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Jo
October 6th 03, 01:14 PM
Do any of you guys know how I can find out how much Creatine I would get
from eating foods such as herring, salmon, tuna, and beef, which are all
know as the best source of natural Creatine.

I would rather eat the above than take it as a powder supplements if I can
get my intake correct.

Also I read you should give your body a rest from Creatine when taken as a
supplement every six weeks for a week, so how does this apply if you are
getting your Creatine from natural sources like food?


Jo

Wayne S. Hill
October 6th 03, 01:54 PM
Jo wrote:

> Do any of you guys know how I can find out how much Creatine
> I would get from eating foods such as herring, salmon, tuna,
> and beef, which are all know as the best source of natural
> Creatine.
>
> I would rather eat the above than take it as a powder
> supplements if I can get my intake correct.

Just eat 2 lbs of any of the above to get the equivalent of
supplementation.

> Also I read you should give your body a rest from Creatine
> when taken as a supplement every six weeks for a week, so
> how does this apply if you are getting your Creatine from
> natural sources like food?

Your logic is faultless. There isn't any need or advantage to
cycling creatine use.

--
-Wayne

Jo
October 6th 03, 02:12 PM
2 Ibs is a lot of fish or meat, do you know how much Creatine I will get
from this?

I think 2 Ibs of the above would cost more than Creatine in powder form. I
would have thought food should be cheaper.

"Wayne S. Hill" > wrote in message
...
> Jo wrote:
>
> > Do any of you guys know how I can find out how much Creatine
> > I would get from eating foods such as herring, salmon, tuna,
> > and beef, which are all know as the best source of natural
> > Creatine.
> >
> > I would rather eat the above than take it as a powder
> > supplements if I can get my intake correct.
>
> Just eat 2 lbs of any of the above to get the equivalent of
> supplementation.
>
> > Also I read you should give your body a rest from Creatine
> > when taken as a supplement every six weeks for a week, so
> > how does this apply if you are getting your Creatine from
> > natural sources like food?
>
> Your logic is faultless. There isn't any need or advantage to
> cycling creatine use.
>
> --
> -Wayne

Bob Garrison
October 6th 03, 02:29 PM
"Jo" > wrote in message
...
> Do any of you guys know how I can find out how much Creatine I would get
> from eating foods such as herring, salmon, tuna, and beef, which are all
> know as the best source of natural Creatine.
>
> I would rather eat the above than take it as a powder supplements if I can
> get my intake correct.
>
> Also I read you should give your body a rest from Creatine when taken as a
> supplement every six weeks for a week, so how does this apply if you are
> getting your Creatine from natural sources like food?
>
>

You should stop eating for one week every 6 weeks.

Chupacabra
October 6th 03, 02:46 PM
On Mon, 6 Oct 2003 09:29:55 -0400, "Bob Garrison"
> wrote:

>
>"Jo" > wrote in message
...
>> Do any of you guys know how I can find out how much Creatine I would get
>> from eating foods such as herring, salmon, tuna, and beef, which are all
>> know as the best source of natural Creatine.
>>
>> I would rather eat the above than take it as a powder supplements if I can
>> get my intake correct.
>>
>> Also I read you should give your body a rest from Creatine when taken as a
>> supplement every six weeks for a week, so how does this apply if you are
>> getting your Creatine from natural sources like food?
>>
>>
>
>You should stop eating for one week every 6 weeks.
>

I shudder to think what loading would look like.

Jo
October 6th 03, 03:02 PM
Well Wayne was spot on if this web site is correct, but I would have a hard
time eating 2Ibs (1Kg) every day.

http://www.degussa-bioactives.com/bioactives/html/e/products/brands/creapure
/sources.htm

Only half of the daily Creatine requirement is synthesized by the body, the
rest must be supplied from our daily diet. Dairy products contain only small
quantities of Creatine (0.1 g/kg in milk), whereas high concentrations can
be found in raw meat (e.g. beef and pork 5g/kg) and fish (e.g. herring
10g/kg) [2]. When meat or fish is cooked, the Creatine content decreases
while the Creatinine content increases [6]. In strict vegetarians, or
vegans, dietary Creatine intake is virtually zero and consequently Creatine
blood plasma levels are lower [7]. The importance and safety of Creatine for
the development of the human body is also reflected by the presence of
Creatine in mother's milk [8].

Table 1. Creatine content in different foods
Creatine content [g/kg]

FISH

Herring 6,5-10
Salmon 4,5
Tuna 4
Cod 3
Plaice 2

MEAT

Pork 5
Beef 4,5

OTHERS

Milk (mother's milk) 0,1
Vegetables traces
Fruits traces
Carbohydrates traces

"Chupacabra" > wrote in message
...
> On Mon, 6 Oct 2003 09:29:55 -0400, "Bob Garrison"
> > wrote:
>
> >
> >"Jo" > wrote in message
> ...
> >> Do any of you guys know how I can find out how much Creatine I would
get
> >> from eating foods such as herring, salmon, tuna, and beef, which are
all
> >> know as the best source of natural Creatine.
> >>
> >> I would rather eat the above than take it as a powder supplements if I
can
> >> get my intake correct.
> >>
> >> Also I read you should give your body a rest from Creatine when taken
as a
> >> supplement every six weeks for a week, so how does this apply if you
are
> >> getting your Creatine from natural sources like food?
> >>
> >>
> >
> >You should stop eating for one week every 6 weeks.
> >
>
> I shudder to think what loading would look like.

Bob Garrison
October 6th 03, 03:04 PM
"Chupacabra" > wrote in message
...
> On Mon, 6 Oct 2003 09:29:55 -0400, "Bob Garrison"
> > wrote:
>
> >
> >"Jo" > wrote in message
> ...
> >> Do any of you guys know how I can find out how much Creatine I would
get
> >> from eating foods such as herring, salmon, tuna, and beef, which are
all
> >> know as the best source of natural Creatine.
> >>
> >> I would rather eat the above than take it as a powder supplements if I
can
> >> get my intake correct.
> >>
> >> Also I read you should give your body a rest from Creatine when taken
as a
> >> supplement every six weeks for a week, so how does this apply if you
are
> >> getting your Creatine from natural sources like food?
> >>
> >>
> >
> >You should stop eating for one week every 6 weeks.
> >
>
> I shudder to think what loading would look like.

10 lbs of beef per day?

buddhabellybum
October 6th 03, 03:22 PM
food my friend is one of the most expensive things in this world. take it
from me, the poor college kid.

feel sorry fo rme dammit!

Kurt

"Jo" > wrote in message
...
> 2 Ibs is a lot of fish or meat, do you know how much Creatine I will get
> from this?
>
> I think 2 Ibs of the above would cost more than Creatine in powder form. I
> would have thought food should be cheaper.
>
> "Wayne S. Hill" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Jo wrote:
> >
> > > Do any of you guys know how I can find out how much Creatine
> > > I would get from eating foods such as herring, salmon, tuna,
> > > and beef, which are all know as the best source of natural
> > > Creatine.
> > >
> > > I would rather eat the above than take it as a powder
> > > supplements if I can get my intake correct.
> >
> > Just eat 2 lbs of any of the above to get the equivalent of
> > supplementation.
> >
> > > Also I read you should give your body a rest from Creatine
> > > when taken as a supplement every six weeks for a week, so
> > > how does this apply if you are getting your Creatine from
> > > natural sources like food?
> >
> > Your logic is faultless. There isn't any need or advantage to
> > cycling creatine use.
> >
> > --
> > -Wayne
>
>

buddhabellybum
October 6th 03, 03:23 PM
ha!

Kurt

"Bob Garrison" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Jo" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Do any of you guys know how I can find out how much Creatine I would get
> > from eating foods such as herring, salmon, tuna, and beef, which are all
> > know as the best source of natural Creatine.
> >
> > I would rather eat the above than take it as a powder supplements if I
can
> > get my intake correct.
> >
> > Also I read you should give your body a rest from Creatine when taken as
a
> > supplement every six weeks for a week, so how does this apply if you are
> > getting your Creatine from natural sources like food?
> >
> >
>
> You should stop eating for one week every 6 weeks.
>
>

Dan Finn
October 6th 03, 05:05 PM
On Mon, 6 Oct 2003 14:12:28 +0100, "Jo" > wrote:

>2 Ibs is a lot of fish or meat, do you know how much Creatine I will get
>from this?
>
that is why even people who consume a lot of red meat get a kick from
creatine.


>I think 2 Ibs of the above would cost more than Creatine in powder form. I
>would have thought food should be cheaper.
>

i think that is the point

dan finn
mfw : this ain't spa lady

DZ
October 6th 03, 05:31 PM
Jo > wrote:
> Only half of the daily Creatine requirement is synthesized by the body, the
> rest must be supplied from our daily diet.
[ ... ]
> In strict vegetarians, or vegans, dietary Creatine intake is
> virtually zero and consequently Creatine blood plasma levels are
> lower

So what happens to them, since it "must be supplied" while it isn't?

DZ

--
Wheel discovery department

DRS
October 6th 03, 06:44 PM
Bob Garrison > wrote in message

> "Chupacabra" > wrote in message
> ...
>> On Mon, 6 Oct 2003 09:29:55 -0400, "Bob Garrison"
>> > wrote:
>>> "Jo" > wrote in message
>>> ...

[...]

>>>> Also I read you should give your body a rest from Creatine when
>>>> taken as a supplement every six weeks for a week, so how does this
>>>> apply if you are getting your Creatine from natural sources like
>>>> food?
>>>
>>> You should stop eating for one week every 6 weeks.
>>
>> I shudder to think what loading would look like.
>
> 10 lbs of beef per day?

How many pounds of dextrose would you need to get the requisite insulin
spike? :-)

--

A: Top-posters.
Q: What is the most annoying thing on Usenet?

Wayne S. Hill
October 6th 03, 10:59 PM
Dan Finn wrote:

> "Jo" wrote:
>
>>2 Ibs is a lot of fish or meat, do you know how much
>>Creatine I will get from this?

Somebody posted numbers on this quite a while ago. Oh, wait,
here it is. This from our dear friend Stephen Mulholland,
December 2000:



From Roger C. Harris
Exercise Physiology Research Group (E.P.R.G.)
University College Chichester, Chichester, West
Sussex, P019 4PE, UK -

"3-6g/kg creatine (and reportedly up to 10g/kg in
herring) are found in muscle meat"

From some other website -
"If you are a heavy consumer of red meat, don't expect
dramatic results from creatine supplementation ( 1
pound of beef equals approximately 2 grams of
creatine, and 4.6 grams in every pound of herring."

From www.nutrition-center.net :

Creatine is also obtained naturally through the foods
we eat and is present in significant amounts in meat,
fish and other animal products (for instance, a one
pound steak contains about 4g of creatine and a pound
of herring yields about 8g).

From
http://www.leanbodies.net/articles/feature/creatine.html

Creatine content grams per kg - Herring 6.5-10

and there's about three hundred billion million
zillion billion other websites that say the same
thing.


> that is why even people who consume a lot of red meat get a
> kick from creatine.
>
>>I think 2 Ibs of the above would cost more than Creatine in
>>powder form. I would have thought food should be cheaper.
>
> i think that is the point

Indeed. Creatine is cheap.

> dan finn
> mfw : this ain't spa lady

<formula one> or Monza, Barcelona, Nurburg, or Hockenheim, for
that matter </f1>

--
-Wayne

Wayne S. Hill
October 6th 03, 11:30 PM
DZ wrote:

> Jo > wrote:
>> Only half of the daily Creatine requirement is synthesized
>> by the body, the rest must be supplied from our daily
>> diet.
> [ ... ]
>> In strict vegetarians, or vegans, dietary Creatine intake
>> is virtually zero and consequently Creatine blood plasma
>> levels are lower
>
> So what happens to them, since it "must be supplied" while
> it isn't?

Well, let's just put it this way: vegetarians usually REALLY
respond to creatine supplementation.

--
-Wayne

DRS
October 7th 03, 04:32 PM
Wayne S. Hill > wrote in message

> Dan Finn wrote:
>> "Jo" wrote:

[...]

>>> I think 2 Ibs of the above would cost more than Creatine in
>>> powder form. I would have thought food should be cheaper.
>>
>> i think that is the point
>
> Indeed. Creatine is cheap.

Well, yes and no. The Chinese stuff is cheap but it's poor quality and
gives a lot of people stomach cramps and the runs. The German stuff
(CreaPure) is better and accordingly more expensive. Now we have NANO
Creatine which is twice the price of CreaPure.

--

A: Top-posters.
Q: What is the most annoying thing on Usenet?

Wayne S. Hill
October 7th 03, 09:04 PM
DRS wrote:

> Wayne S. Hill > wrote in message

>> Indeed. Creatine is cheap.
>
> Well, yes and no. The Chinese stuff is cheap but it's poor
> quality and gives a lot of people stomach cramps and the
> runs. The German stuff (CreaPure) is better and accordingly
> more expensive. Now we have NANO Creatine which is twice
> the price of CreaPure.

Even "expensive" creatine is cheap, IMO.

--
-Wayne

Jo
October 8th 03, 10:59 AM
So how can I tell if it's Chinese or German?

The two products I looked at say:

Creatine Monohydrate 5.2g, Taurine 1000mg "Carefully Manufactured by U.S.
Nutrition (USA) for Holland & Barrett (UK)"

And

Explosive Creatine. Micronised Creatine 5g, Taurine 1000mg Manufactured for
LA muscle.

Jo

"Wayne S. Hill" > wrote in message
...
> DRS wrote:
>
> > Wayne S. Hill > wrote in message
>
> >> Indeed. Creatine is cheap.
> >
> > Well, yes and no. The Chinese stuff is cheap but it's poor
> > quality and gives a lot of people stomach cramps and the
> > runs. The German stuff (CreaPure) is better and accordingly
> > more expensive. Now we have NANO Creatine which is twice
> > the price of CreaPure.
>
> Even "expensive" creatine is cheap, IMO.
>
> --
> -Wayne