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Head Beagle
August 4th 05, 05:58 PM
Alright, this is sort of cooking, sort of dietary/nutrition, sort of a
collection of other things, so I am putting it here and a couple other
places to get a nice, wide ranging response.

Allow me to explain my situation. I am a fifth year senior who is going
to be living not in a dorm/not on a meal plan for the first time. As it
turns out, I have no idea how to keep myself properly nourished. I
REALLY REALLY want to avoid the ramen, pizza, and hot dogs menu route
of many college students. So, to that end, I am collecting advice from
cooks and other people who know a lot about food.

Here is a bit about me so you can know what you are working with.

6 foot 4, 170 lbs.
I play competitive club ultimate frisbee, so I engage in strenuous
exercise 10-15 hours a week. I use a ton of energy, so it takes a lot
of food to keep me going.
I am also planning on starting weightlifting, something I have never
really done before. So, whatever dietary changes that should cause
should be included.

2 questions:

#1
what does a guy like me eat to keep my energy up and try to establish
healthy eating habits for life?
#2
How do I cook that?

Submit whatever you like. 1 meal, a weeklong menu/meal plan, 1 recipe,
whatever you please.

Thanks!!!

OmManiPadmeOmelet
August 4th 05, 06:32 PM
In article om>,
"Head Beagle" > wrote:

> Alright, this is sort of cooking, sort of dietary/nutrition, sort of a
> collection of other things, so I am putting it here and a couple other
> places to get a nice, wide ranging response.
>
> Allow me to explain my situation. I am a fifth year senior who is going
> to be living not in a dorm/not on a meal plan for the first time. As it
> turns out, I have no idea how to keep myself properly nourished. I
> REALLY REALLY want to avoid the ramen, pizza, and hot dogs menu route
> of many college students. So, to that end, I am collecting advice from
> cooks and other people who know a lot about food.
>
> Here is a bit about me so you can know what you are working with.
>
> 6 foot 4, 170 lbs.
> I play competitive club ultimate frisbee, so I engage in strenuous
> exercise 10-15 hours a week. I use a ton of energy, so it takes a lot
> of food to keep me going.
> I am also planning on starting weightlifting, something I have never
> really done before. So, whatever dietary changes that should cause
> should be included.
>
> 2 questions:
>
> #1
> what does a guy like me eat to keep my energy up and try to establish
> healthy eating habits for life?
> #2
> How do I cook that?
>
> Submit whatever you like. 1 meal, a weeklong menu/meal plan, 1 recipe,
> whatever you please.
>
> Thanks!!!
>

You may try going to the bookstore so you have a good reference.
Look for books on "Sports nutrition". Many of them have meal plans and
recipes, as well as basic cooking instructions.

Good luck!
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson

Steve Freides
August 4th 05, 06:51 PM
"Head Beagle" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Alright, this is sort of cooking, sort of dietary/nutrition, sort of a
> collection of other things, so I am putting it here and a couple other
> places to get a nice, wide ranging response.
>
> Allow me to explain my situation. I am a fifth year senior who is
> going
> to be living not in a dorm/not on a meal plan for the first time. As
> it
> turns out, I have no idea how to keep myself properly nourished. I
> REALLY REALLY want to avoid the ramen, pizza, and hot dogs menu route
> of many college students. So, to that end, I am collecting advice from
> cooks and other people who know a lot about food.
>
> Here is a bit about me so you can know what you are working with.
>
> 6 foot 4, 170 lbs.
> I play competitive club ultimate frisbee, so I engage in strenuous
> exercise 10-15 hours a week. I use a ton of energy, so it takes a lot
> of food to keep me going.
> I am also planning on starting weightlifting, something I have never
> really done before. So, whatever dietary changes that should cause
> should be included.
>
> 2 questions:
>
> #1
> what does a guy like me eat to keep my energy up and try to establish
> healthy eating habits for life?
> #2
> How do I cook that?
>
> Submit whatever you like. 1 meal, a weeklong menu/meal plan, 1 recipe,
> whatever you please.
>
> Thanks!!!

At 6 foot 4, 170 lbs., I'd say "the ramen, pizza, and hot dogs menu
route" sounds pretty good for you. Add some steak and some ice cream
while you're at it, lift weights regularly, and see if you can add a bit
of muscle to your frame.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com

T
August 4th 05, 06:53 PM
OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

> In article om>,
> "Head Beagle" > wrote:
>
>
>>Alright, this is sort of cooking, sort of dietary/nutrition, sort of a
>>collection of other things, so I am putting it here and a couple other
>>places to get a nice, wide ranging response.
>>
>>Allow me to explain my situation. I am a fifth year senior who is going
>>to be living not in a dorm/not on a meal plan for the first time. As it
>>turns out, I have no idea how to keep myself properly nourished. I
>>REALLY REALLY want to avoid the ramen, pizza, and hot dogs menu route
>>of many college students. So, to that end, I am collecting advice from
>>cooks and other people who know a lot about food.
>>
>>Here is a bit about me so you can know what you are working with.
>>
>>6 foot 4, 170 lbs.
>>I play competitive club ultimate frisbee, so I engage in strenuous
>>exercise 10-15 hours a week. I use a ton of energy, so it takes a lot
>>of food to keep me going.
>>I am also planning on starting weightlifting, something I have never
>>really done before. So, whatever dietary changes that should cause
>>should be included.
>>
>>2 questions:
>>
>>#1
>>what does a guy like me eat to keep my energy up and try to establish
>>healthy eating habits for life?
>>#2
>>How do I cook that?

Fruit, salad, protein.

Fruit: no cooking, no juice; applesauce, maybe.

Salad: spinach or romaine for a base, cukes, tomatoes, onions, peppers...

Protein: eggs, meat, fish, skim dairy. Drink milk, mix skim yogurt with
balsamic vinegar and flaxseed oil for your salad dressing, stuff seeded
jalapenos with peanut butter and roast them (www.chilegrill.com) for a delicious
snack, George Foreman Grill boneless skinless chicken breasts, top with salsa or
chop it up and put it in the salad, omelets, hard boiled eggs chopped into
salad, sardines in mustard sauce for a delicious backpack snack,
chicken/tuna/egg salad on whole wheat bread....

August 4th 05, 07:55 PM
One way to do it is to make Milk the backbone of your diet. And I am
not talking one or two glasses, up to 1/2 gal a day can be good. You
should learn to drink skim milk, and then get your fats from healthier
sources like vegtable oil and nuts. I assume you have a stove and a
frying pan and an oven. Buy the biggest hunk of meat you can find at
the grocery store, prok But, Beef Roast, anything that is $1.50 - $3.50
US per pound. Wrap it in foil, and throw it in the oven up to 1hr per
pound at 225 degrees,. Take it out, let it cool for an hour or so, and
shred it into a tupperwear container. Buy the big frozen bags of
vegtables. Then all week long, take out your meat stash, and throw
some on a skillet with olive oil and some veggies, cook on medium until
it is all hot, season as you like.

Or if you are really lazy just eat the meat out of the tupperwear
container right over the sink. Also, buy you can buy some Whole Grain
bread and make sandwiches.

In the morning eat Oatmeal, and/or eggs, actually eggs are good
anytime, throw some in the pan in the recipie above.

So your grocery list is:
Hunk of Meat
Frozen Veggies
Eggs
Milk
Oatmeal
Whole Grain Bread
Olive Oil
Foil

With this base you should be getting mostly all required daily
nutrition, and at your size and activiy level, feel free to go out and
throw down pizzas and ice cream on top of this

Peter Allen
August 4th 05, 09:11 PM
Head Beagle wrote:
> Alright, this is sort of cooking, sort of dietary/nutrition, sort of a
> collection of other things, so I am putting it here and a couple other
> places to get a nice, wide ranging response.
>
> Allow me to explain my situation. I am a fifth year senior who is
> going to be living not in a dorm/not on a meal plan for the first
> time. As it turns out, I have no idea how to keep myself properly
> nourished. I REALLY REALLY want to avoid the ramen, pizza, and hot
> dogs menu route of many college students. So, to that end, I am
> collecting advice from cooks and other people who know a lot about
> food.
>
> Here is a bit about me so you can know what you are working with.
>
> 6 foot 4, 170 lbs.
> I play competitive club ultimate frisbee, so I engage in strenuous
> exercise 10-15 hours a week. I use a ton of energy, so it takes a lot
> of food to keep me going.
> I am also planning on starting weightlifting, something I have never
> really done before. So, whatever dietary changes that should cause
> should be included.
>
> 2 questions:
>
> #1
> what does a guy like me eat to keep my energy up and try to establish
> healthy eating habits for life?

Meat, fish, fruit and veg, pasta/rice/whatever. Milk is also good.

> How do I cook that?

Meat: millions of ways, you'll find loads of recipes on the net. Bolognese
sauce and stir frys are easy for a start.
Bolognese: chop up an onion or two, put minced meat in a pan, full heat,
stir until it's all changed from red to greyish. Put in the onion, can of
chopped tomatoes, let it simmer for a bit. If you want to make it more
interesting, any of some red wine (and cook for 5 minutes after putting that
in), bit of oregano, celery, carrots, pepper will go, in fact you can add
almost anything and it'll work. Just let everything cook for at least 15
minutes in total so the taste soaks in to the meat and make sure enough
water boils off that it isn't too liquid.
Stir fry: cut up meat (chicken, turkey, pork) into bitesize bits, put it in
a pan (a wok is good here, woks are useful, if you don't have that a normal
pan will do). Sear the surfaces, put in any veg you want to (especially
celery, carrots, onion), put in a bit of soy sauce (if you like it), white
wine or dry vermouth is good, maybe some chopped up almonds (if you didn't
put in soy sauce), cook for a few minutes until the meat is done all the way
through (cut a bit in half and look, if you're not sure cook longer). If you
want beansprouts or cucumber or that sort of soft thing put it in when
you're nearly done or they'll go sludgy.

Fish: put it under the grill, grill both sides until done (cut it open and
look). Or follow a recipe.

Fruit: just eat it, don't cook it.

Veg: either in meat dishes or most veg you can chop up and put in a pan of
boiling water for a couple of minutes, grab a bit out with a fork, run it
under cold water and eat it to see when it's done.

Pasta, rice, whatever you do according to the instructions on the packet...

Most things with cooking will taste OK even if you cock up a bit. You'll
fairly soon get an idea of what tastes good with what and how much of a herb
or spice to use. Just don't under-do meat (mainly pork, poultry) or you may
get food poisoning, don't overcook vegetables or they'll taste like crap.
The stuff where you have to follow the recipe closely or a disaster will
happen is mainly if you get into baking stuff, making puddings and so on.
Meat dishes you can throw in what looks like a reasonable amount of the
whatever and it'll work.

You want to be eating a decent amount of meat/fish - say enough so you're
getting about 170g a day of protein (and remember protein is also in milk,
pasta, etc, check the nutritional info on the packet), enough pasta/whatever
so you aren't getting hungry, probably more veg and fruit than you're used
to because most people don't eat enough, and a pint of milk a day is not a
bad starting place. You also want to be getting a bit of fat in your diet,
preferably from oily fish or olive oil, that sort of thing. After that,
snack on whatever you want to, if you start putting on fat then cut back on
the snacks.

Peter

Dally
August 4th 05, 11:05 PM
Head Beagle wrote:

> Allow me to explain my situation. I am a fifth year senior who is going
> to be living not in a dorm/not on a meal plan for the first time. As it
> turns out, I have no idea how to keep myself properly nourished. I
> REALLY REALLY want to avoid the ramen, pizza, and hot dogs menu route
> of many college students. So, to that end, I am collecting advice from
> cooks and other people who know a lot about food.

> what does a guy like me eat to keep my energy up and try to establish
> healthy eating habits for life?

Excellent question.

If I were you I'd buy a George Foreman grill. They're cheap, quick and
easy to use, clean up relatively easy and do a good job with chicken &
fish, even from a frozen state.

I tend to buy individually frozen fish filets and chicken from the
warehouse store and cook them on the George Foreman and serve them with
salad.

You're in luck with regard to salads - every place has salad bars you
can use for cut-up veggies and you can buy salad in bags. If I were you
I'd buy and make a large salad once a week and have frozen veggies for
when the salad gets too old before you get back to the store.

Try out brown basmati rice. It takes a little longer to cook but it's
worth it. A rice cooker might be a useful investment for you, as might
a bread machine.

Get a basket steamer to insert into a medium-to-large sauce pan with a
fitted lid. Steam up some broccoli or cauliflower or brussel sprouts or
whatever in enough quantity to last a few days and eat the leftovers
with grilled meat when you're sick of salads.


> Here is a bit about me so you can know what you are working with.
>
> 6 foot 4, 170 lbs.
> I play competitive club ultimate frisbee, so I engage in strenuous
> exercise 10-15 hours a week. I use a ton of energy, so it takes a lot
> of food to keep me going.

The key to eating well is to have thought about it in advance. Junk
carbs will magically appear whenever you're hungry, but high-fiber carbs
and lean proteins will only show up if you PUT them there.

Develop a bunch of snacks that revolve around a dose of fiber, a dose of
protein and a dollop of fats (from seed or fish oils if possible.)

Some examples are: apples sliced up and dipped in peanutbutter (use one
of those circular gadgets that cores and slices at the same time.)

Cottage cheese mixed with canned fruit and/or yogurt. Cottage cheese
has saturated fat in it, but it's an easy way to add protein to things.

Hard-boiled eggs are another nice way to get protein.

Use meal replacement shakes like EAS Myoplex or bars like Balance Bars
to get some protein in a snack.

Try a banana with a wedge cut out and peanutbutter inserted.

Try wasa crisp crackers microwaved to melt some cheese or with some cold
cuts on top.

Plan on eating often, and grocery shop with that in mind: get breakfast
foods, lunch/dinner foods (they can be the same thing) and snack foods.
Shop the outside edge of the grocery store: vegetables & fruits,
dairy, meats, high-fiber breads.

A good breakfast is the 5 minute oatmeal that you mix with some
chocolate protein powder, peanutbutter, raisins and water and microwave
on 50% power for 5 minutes.

I like 100% whole wheat bagels with cream cheese and a couple of ounces
of smoked salmon on top for breakfast, too.

Try to make carbs be there for a reason: either for fiber or for
phytonutrients or because you specifically need the energy boost. Junk
carbs are the downfall of many a newly sedentary twenty-something, which
isn't you YET, but will be you when you get a sedentary job and stop
playing Ultimate every day.

The best thing you've got going for you is that you're thinking about
this. Pre-planning, thinking about a menu before you shop, is probably
the most important thing you can do for your diet because then whatever
you choose to eat will be okay.

Good luck.

Dally

Hobbes
August 4th 05, 11:35 PM
In article >,
DZ > wrote:

> Dally > wrote:
> > Head Beagle wrote:
> >
> >> Allow me to explain my situation. I am a fifth year senior who is going
> >> to be living not in a dorm/not on a meal plan for the first time. As it
> >> turns out, I have no idea how to keep myself properly nourished.
>
> > Develop a bunch of snacks
>
> Only if you can't stay away from junk food otherwise.
>
> > Use meal replacement shakes like EAS Myoplex or bars like Balance Bars
> > to get some protein in a snack.
>
> That's cat food for people and also an an example of junk food. Nobody
> NEEDS that stuff.
>
> > Plan on eating often
>
> Well it's all good for the old, "mama" advice. But it's also the
> opposite of the new, National Institute of Aging advice concerning
> healthy eating habits -
>
> http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi
>
> search for
>
> "mattson mp"[Author] AND (dietary OR "intermittent fasting")
>
> DZ

Can you give us a quick summary of your own diet plan, DZ?

I know you generally only eat one meal per day, but do you have a plan
at all or do you just rely on your discipline and low appetite?

--
Keith

Dally
August 5th 05, 12:19 AM
DZ wrote:

> Dally > wrote:
>
>>Head Beagle wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Allow me to explain my situation. I am a fifth year senior who is going
>>>to be living not in a dorm/not on a meal plan for the first time. As it
>>>turns out, I have no idea how to keep myself properly nourished.
>
>
>>Develop a bunch of snacks
>
>
> Only if you can't stay away from junk food otherwise.

The guy has no existing habits. Junk food is easy to find. A little
forethought will save him from falling into it.

>>Use meal replacement shakes like EAS Myoplex or bars like Balance Bars
>>to get some protein in a snack.
>
>
> That's cat food for people and also an an example of junk food. Nobody
> NEEDS that stuff.

I totally agree. It was a nod towards his need for shelf-stable
ready-made snacks with protein.

>>Plan on eating often
>
> Well it's all good for the old, "mama" advice. But it's also the
> opposite of the new, National Institute of Aging advice concerning
> healthy eating habits -
>
> http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi
>
> search for
>
> "mattson mp"[Author] AND (dietary OR "intermittent fasting")

Interesting. I'd heard something about this as a possible thrust in
reducing tumor growth. I think it might lead to an interesting line of
thought regarding the retardation of aging. I'd lump it in with CR.

I think there's a time and a place for that, but a 22 year old who needs
lots of energy for his intense ultimate frisbee games and has a stellar
metabolism (I'm assuming) is probably not a great candidate for this.
The guy is trying to learn how to eat healthy foods versus ramen noodles
and hot dogs, not how to live to be 120.

It's worth knowing that there are other issues besides fueling your
game, though. But I'm going to stick to the "mama" advice taht comes so
easily to me.

You're right about the crappy Balance Bars, though. Don't eat them,
kid. Have an apple and a chunk of cheese instead.

Dally

The Queen of Cans and Jars
August 5th 05, 02:23 AM
Head Beagle > wrote:

> #1
> what does a guy like me eat to keep my energy up and try to establish
> healthy eating habits for life?

Food.

> #2
> How do I cook that?

http://tinyurl.com/85xun

Richard dopey bastard Hedd
August 5th 05, 02:50 AM
In article >,
"Steve Freides" > writes:
> "Head Beagle" > wrote in message
> ups.com...
[snip]
>>
>> Here is a bit about me so you can know what you are working with.
>>
>> 6 foot 4, 170 lbs.
[snip]
>
> At 6 foot 4, 170 lbs., I'd say "the ramen, pizza, and hot dogs menu
> route" sounds pretty good for you.
[snip]

Except for what a steady diet of that stuff might do to his
cholesterol?

6'4" and 170 lbs. - wow. I'm 6'4" and a bit over 190 lbs. atm, and
people think I already look skinny.

--
Jim Seymour | "It is wrong always, everywhere and
WARNING: The "From:" address is a | for everyone to believe anything upon
spam trap. DON'T USE IT! Use: | insufficient evidence."
| - W. K. Clifford, ca. 1876

Steve Freides
August 5th 05, 03:44 AM
"DZ" > wrote in message
...
> Hobbes > wrote:
>> DZ wrote:
>>> Dally > wrote:
>>> > Head Beagle wrote:
>>> >
>>> >> Allow me to explain my situation. I am a fifth year senior who is
>>> >> going
>>> >> to be living not in a dorm/not on a meal plan for the first time.
>>> >> As it
>>> >> turns out, I have no idea how to keep myself properly nourished.
>>>
>>> > Develop a bunch of snacks
>>>
>>> Only if you can't stay away from junk food otherwise.
>>>
>>> > Use meal replacement shakes like EAS Myoplex or bars like Balance
>>> > Bars
>>> > to get some protein in a snack.
>>>
>>> That's cat food for people and also an an example of junk food.
>>> Nobody
>>> NEEDS that stuff.
>>>
>>> > Plan on eating often
>>>
>>> Well it's all good for the old, "mama" advice. But it's also the
>>> opposite of the new, National Institute of Aging advice concerning
>>> healthy eating habits -
>>>
>>> http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi
>>>
>>> search for
>>>
>>> "mattson mp"[Author] AND (dietary OR "intermittent fasting")
>>>
>> Can you give us a quick summary of your own diet plan, DZ?
>>
>> I know you generally only eat one meal per day, but do you have a
>> plan
>> at all or do you just rely on your discipline and low appetite?
>
> Keith, let me make it clear that I repost that tiresome information -
> in that case it could be viewed as having somewhat abrasive style -
> only for the balance of viewpoints. If you find that energy bars and
> multiple meals help you to be in whatever shape you'd like to be I'm
> not going to argue. But Dally's post unequivocally asserted that the
> way to go as far as the healthy eating habits are concerned is to eat
> often, along the lines that breakfast is the most important meal of
> the day and snacks are unquestionably necessary to maintain high
> energy levels and to assure deliverance from sin. That view is biased.
>
> BTW personally I don't notice any positive effect of food on my
> immediately followed self-perceived energy levels - if anything, food
> might make me sleepy. Maybe it's the consequence of my "adaptation" to
> low frequency meals.
>
> I'm not sure if I have a definite plan. I take supplements during the
> day (not performance-enhancing) - I guess it's sort of like D. Cohen's
> LEF style except he claims to have pig's meat with that. I wouldn't
> ever go to lunch by myself but I'm not militant about that. If I have
> to (say for some social reason) I'd go even for a breakfast to a fast
> food place.

Since I eat this way, too, I'd like to chime in.

I find I have hungry days and not hungry days, e.g., today I had nothing
during the day except a cup of coffee around noon, but yesterday I was
hungry so I had a PB&J sandwich at 11am then nothing until dinner.
IMHO, so much of eating for most people is just habit. Eating different
amounts on different days, which is nothing more than eating when you're
hungry and not eating when you're not - instead of following some
schedule or other - seems to be a pretty good way to keep yourself
well-nourished without getting fat.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com

JamesG
August 5th 05, 02:41 PM
Beagle,
The stroganoff recipe at the bottom of this message is very easy to
make and is one of my favorite meals. My mom used to make it for us
when I was growing up. At 6'4" 170lbs this is a good meal that will
stick to your ribs. I would also recommend eating a lot of spaghetti,
its easy and is one of my favorites. Both these meals are good at
supplying a lot of energy in my opinion. Morning and night I also
drink a smoothie with frozen bananas, strawberries, pears, honey,
protein powder, and soy milk. I think these are tasty.

Easy Stroganoff

This is an easy recipe that tastes good and can feed a family for days

2 pounds ground meat (beef or turkey are both good)
1 onion cut up
2 standard cans of cream of mushroom soup
1 or 2 cans of water, I just add water to get the desired consistency.
Keep the mixture fairly thick.
2 packages of dry ranch dressing mix
Egg noodles

Brown the ground meat with the onion. Drain the fat if beef is used,
turkey is usually lean enough to not require draining. Add the cream
of mushroom soup and water. Mix in the Ranch Dressing mix. Simmer
while the noodles are cooked. Serve over the cooked noodles.

--
Rec.food.recipes is moderated by Patricia D. Hill at .
Only recipes and recipe requests are accepted for posting.
Please allow several days for your submission to appear.
Archives: http://www.cdkitchen.com/rfr/ http://recipes.alastra.com/

Dally
August 5th 05, 02:53 PM
JamesG wrote:

> Beagle,
> The stroganoff recipe at the bottom of this message is very easy to
> make and is one of my favorite meals. My mom used to make it for us
> when I was growing up. At 6'4" 170lbs this is a good meal that will
> stick to your ribs.
> Easy Stroganoff
>
> This is an easy recipe that tastes good and can feed a family for days
>
> 2 pounds ground meat (beef or turkey are both good)
> 1 onion cut up
> 2 standard cans of cream of mushroom soup
> 1 or 2 cans of water, I just add water to get the desired consistency.
> Keep the mixture fairly thick.
> 2 packages of dry ranch dressing mix
> Egg noodles
>
> Brown the ground meat with the onion. Drain the fat if beef is used,
> turkey is usually lean enough to not require draining. Add the cream
> of mushroom soup and water. Mix in the Ranch Dressing mix. Simmer
> while the noodles are cooked. Serve over the cooked noodles.

Now ditch the cream of mushroom soup and ranch dressing packet and add
more vegetables and a tub of sour cream and a quarter-cup of red wine.
Diced up summer squash or/or peppers will add fiber and nutrients and
color and flavor. Frozen peas will do the job, too.

Dally

Hobbes
August 5th 05, 03:08 PM
In article >,
DZ > wrote:

> Keith, let me make it clear that I repost that tiresome information -
> in that case it could be viewed as having somewhat abrasive style -
> only for the balance of viewpoints. If you find that energy bars and
> multiple meals help you to be in whatever shape you'd like to be I'm
> not going to argue. But Dally's post unequivocally asserted that the
> way to go as far as the healthy eating habits are concerned is to eat
> often, along the lines that breakfast is the most important meal of
> the day and snacks are unquestionably necessary to maintain high
> energy levels and to assure deliverance from sin. That view is biased.
>
> BTW personally I don't notice any positive effect of food on my
> immediately followed self-perceived energy levels - if anything, food
> might make me sleepy. Maybe it's the consequence of my "adaptation" to
> low frequency meals.
>
> I'm not sure if I have a definite plan. I take supplements during the
> day (not performance-enhancing) - I guess it's sort of like D. Cohen's
> LEF style except he claims to have pig's meat with that. I wouldn't
> ever go to lunch by myself but I'm not militant about that. If I have
> to (say for some social reason) I'd go even for a breakfast to a fast
> food place.

I wasn't asking to be contentious. I'm going to drop some weight and I
was curious about your diet. I tend to agree based on my limited
knowledge of the digestive tract that constant feeding is not necessary
for either energy or health.

--
Keith

Peter Allen
August 5th 05, 03:36 PM
Dally wrote:
> Now ditch the cream of mushroom soup and ranch dressing packet and add
> more vegetables and a tub of sour cream and a quarter-cup of red wine.

I think you and I might cook slightly differently. Can you actually taste a
quarter of a cup of red wine in a meal?

(I get through a bottle of cooking wine in a week or so)

Peter

Dally
August 5th 05, 03:43 PM
Peter Allen wrote:

> Dally wrote:
>
>>Now ditch the cream of mushroom soup and ranch dressing packet and add
>>more vegetables and a tub of sour cream and a quarter-cup of red wine.
>
>
> I think you and I might cook slightly differently. Can you actually taste a
> quarter of a cup of red wine in a meal?
>
> (I get through a bottle of cooking wine in a week or so)
>
> Peter

LOL, you're right. The recipes all say quarter cup. But then I add a
few glugs and while the wine is open I pour myself a glass while I cook.

Dally

JamesG
August 5th 05, 03:48 PM
Dally,
Okay I will admit that the recipe may be using the term stroganoff
loosely, but I love the stuff whatever it is. I usually serve it with
vegetables. The wine would be for drinking in college as I remember it
and would be contained in a box. I guess he could throw some of the
box wine in there! I've added the sour cream and it tastes good too, I
just usually don't have it lying around. I was figuring I would give
him the starving student version.

Warm Regards,
James