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November 17th 05, 07:08 AM
I am considering a weight training machine to work out at home, it has
a pull up bar located at 82", I would like to place it inside the
house (ceiling : 8 ft / 96") , instead of the garage for various
reasons. I was wondering if a ceiling height of 8' would hinder the
pull up exercise. I figure my shoulders do not reach up past the
handle bar, and from the shoulder to top of my head should leave me
about 2-3" from the ceiling.

Next question is the foundation of the home, it is crawl space
foundation type, the various weight machines I am looking at varies
from 250-350 lbs, would I need to add any reinfocements in the crawl
space or generally this kind of weight, plus mine (160 lbs), so figure
about 500 lbs loaded on around a 3'' x 5' area.

Thanks in advance!

Lee Michaels
November 17th 05, 07:18 AM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
>I am considering a weight training machine to work out at home, it has
> a pull up bar located at 82", I would like to place it inside the
> house (ceiling : 8 ft / 96") , instead of the garage for various
> reasons. I was wondering if a ceiling height of 8' would hinder the
> pull up exercise. I figure my shoulders do not reach up past the
> handle bar, and from the shoulder to top of my head should leave me
> about 2-3" from the ceiling.
>
> Next question is the foundation of the home, it is crawl space
> foundation type, the various weight machines I am looking at varies
> from 250-350 lbs, would I need to add any reinfocements in the crawl
> space or generally this kind of weight, plus mine (160 lbs), so figure
> about 500 lbs loaded on around a 3'' x 5' area.
>
I doin't know what you are calling a machine, but almost all "machines" are
garbage and far inferior (and much more expensive) than some basic weight
training equipment.

Almost any floor can handle this weight. This is like three of four people
standing in close proximity.

And if you need to do chins close to a ceiling, just lower the bar. This is
easily done with straps (webbing) or some cable handles hooked to some chan
or webbing thrown over the bar. Just bend the knees and chin to the new
lower high point hanging from the regular height chin bars.

spodosaurus
November 17th 05, 08:16 AM
wrote:
> I am considering a weight training machine

Which "machine"?

> to work out at home, it has
> a pull up bar located at 82", I would like to place it inside the
> house (ceiling : 8 ft / 96") , instead of the garage for various
> reasons. I was wondering if a ceiling height of 8' would hinder the
> pull up exercise. I figure my shoulders do not reach up past the
> handle bar, and from the shoulder to top of my head should leave me
> about 2-3" from the ceiling.
>

When you develop the strength to pull the bar to your chest, the tops of
your shoulders will be above the bar. Any momentum also involved
increases the experience of pain as your head impacts the ceiling.

> Next question is the foundation of the home, it is crawl space
> foundation type, the various weight machines I am looking at varies
> from 250-350 lbs, would I need to add any reinfocements in the crawl
> space or generally this kind of weight, plus mine (160 lbs), so figure
> about 500 lbs loaded on around a 3'' x 5' area.

Sorry, I haven't a clue on this one.

Cheers,

Ari

--
spammage trappage: remove the underscores to reply

I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. Complications in
hospital following this resulted in a serious illness. I now need a bone
marrow transplant. Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow
transplant, too. Please volunteer to be a marrow donor:
http://www.abmdr.org.au/
http://www.marrow.org/

David
November 17th 05, 08:26 AM
"spodosaurus" > wrote in message
...
> wrote:
>> I am considering a weight training machine
>
> Which "machine"?
>
>> to work out at home, it has
>> a pull up bar located at 82", I would like to place it inside the
>> house (ceiling : 8 ft / 96") , instead of the garage for various
>> reasons. I was wondering if a ceiling height of 8' would hinder the
>> pull up exercise. I figure my shoulders do not reach up past the
>> handle bar, and from the shoulder to top of my head should leave me
>> about 2-3" from the ceiling.
>>
>
> When you develop the strength to pull the bar to your chest, the tops of
> your shoulders will be above the bar. Any momentum also involved increases
> the experience of pain as your head impacts the ceiling.
>
>> Next question is the foundation of the home, it is crawl space
>> foundation type, the various weight machines I am looking at varies
>> from 250-350 lbs, would I need to add any reinfocements in the crawl
>> space or generally this kind of weight, plus mine (160 lbs), so figure
>> about 500 lbs loaded on around a 3'' x 5' area.
>
> Sorry, I haven't a clue on this one.

Ari, I believe this person is a f------d. How does he expect anyone to be
able to figure out what his structural load is

spodosaurus
November 17th 05, 09:02 AM
David wrote:
> "spodosaurus" > wrote in message
> ...
>
wrote:
>>
>>>I am considering a weight training machine
>>
>>Which "machine"?
>>
>>
>>>to work out at home, it has
>>>a pull up bar located at 82", I would like to place it inside the
>>>house (ceiling : 8 ft / 96") , instead of the garage for various
>>>reasons. I was wondering if a ceiling height of 8' would hinder the
>>>pull up exercise. I figure my shoulders do not reach up past the
>>>handle bar, and from the shoulder to top of my head should leave me
>>>about 2-3" from the ceiling.
>>>
>>
>>When you develop the strength to pull the bar to your chest, the tops of
>>your shoulders will be above the bar. Any momentum also involved increases
>>the experience of pain as your head impacts the ceiling.
>>
>>
>>>Next question is the foundation of the home, it is crawl space
>>>foundation type, the various weight machines I am looking at varies
>>>from 250-350 lbs, would I need to add any reinfocements in the crawl
>>>space or generally this kind of weight, plus mine (160 lbs), so figure
>>>about 500 lbs loaded on around a 3'' x 5' area.
>>
>>Sorry, I haven't a clue on this one.
>
>
> Ari, I believe this person is a f------d. How does he expect anyone to be
> able to figure out what his structural load is
>
>

Someone with experience here might be able to tell him in general terms,
but nobody here even knows exactly what he's planning on putting in that
room, much less the structure and condition of his specific house.

Ari


--
spammage trappage: remove the underscores to reply

I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. Complications in
hospital following this resulted in a serious illness. I now need a bone
marrow transplant. Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow
transplant, too. Please volunteer to be a marrow donor:
http://www.abmdr.org.au/
http://www.marrow.org/

Spammers_Should_Be_Shot
November 17th 05, 10:18 AM
"David" > wrote in message
...
>
> "spodosaurus" > wrote in message
> ...
> > wrote:
> >> I am considering a weight training machine
> >
> > Which "machine"?
> >
> >> to work out at home, it has
> >> a pull up bar located at 82", I would like to place it inside the
> >> house (ceiling : 8 ft / 96") , instead of the garage for various
> >> reasons. I was wondering if a ceiling height of 8' would hinder the
> >> pull up exercise. I figure my shoulders do not reach up past the
> >> handle bar, and from the shoulder to top of my head should leave me
> >> about 2-3" from the ceiling.
> >>
> >
> > When you develop the strength to pull the bar to your chest, the tops of
> > your shoulders will be above the bar. Any momentum also involved
increases
> > the experience of pain as your head impacts the ceiling.
> >
> >> Next question is the foundation of the home, it is crawl space
> >> foundation type, the various weight machines I am looking at varies
> >> from 250-350 lbs, would I need to add any reinfocements in the crawl
> >> space or generally this kind of weight, plus mine (160 lbs), so figure
> >> about 500 lbs loaded on around a 3'' x 5' area.
> >
> > Sorry, I haven't a clue on this one.
>
> Ari, I believe this person is a f------d. How does he expect anyone to be
> able to figure out what his structural load is

55 psf (pounds per square foot) = equates to 40 psf Top-live(1), 10 psf
Top-dead(2), and 5 psf Bottom-dead(2). All building codes require that the
stiffness factor be at least L/360 (though it's common to use L/480 to
minimize deflection or "bouncy" floor). The OP need not worry about weight
causing structural failure. The only real concern would be cosmetic (i.e.
cracks in a finished ceiling below, cracks in grout lines of a tile floor,
dents/scruffs in a wood floor, etc.) As a general rule of thumb, you almost
never need to worry about a load until it's 750+lbs. in a 1 s.f. area (think
a FAT guy standing on one leg). Anything less than that will be fine. Now
if the OP is deadlifting (and dropping) 1500+lb lifts, I'd suggest he
consult a local Structural Engineer to further address his rooms structural
capabilities.

(1) Live Loads are those loads that can come and go over the life of the
structure. This would typically include people and furniture, but may
include such things as wind, snow, and ice in roof applications. Most
building codes require a floor system to be able to withstand 40 psf load.
Typically, a floor system will never see full live load unless it's flooded
8-inches deep in water!
(2) Dead Loads are the weights of the building materials used in the
structure itself. This might include such things as the joists, subfloor,
carpet/padding, flooring tile, acoustic tile and sheetrock.

David
November 17th 05, 11:04 AM
"Spammers_Should_Be_Shot" > wrote in message
...
>
> "David" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "spodosaurus" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> > wrote:
>> >> I am considering a weight training machine
>> >
>> > Which "machine"?
>> >
>> >> to work out at home, it has
>> >> a pull up bar located at 82", I would like to place it inside the
>> >> house (ceiling : 8 ft / 96") , instead of the garage for various
>> >> reasons. I was wondering if a ceiling height of 8' would hinder the
>> >> pull up exercise. I figure my shoulders do not reach up past the
>> >> handle bar, and from the shoulder to top of my head should leave me
>> >> about 2-3" from the ceiling.
>> >>
>> >
>> > When you develop the strength to pull the bar to your chest, the tops
>> > of
>> > your shoulders will be above the bar. Any momentum also involved
> increases
>> > the experience of pain as your head impacts the ceiling.
>> >
>> >> Next question is the foundation of the home, it is crawl space
>> >> foundation type, the various weight machines I am looking at varies
>> >> from 250-350 lbs, would I need to add any reinfocements in the crawl
>> >> space or generally this kind of weight, plus mine (160 lbs), so figure
>> >> about 500 lbs loaded on around a 3'' x 5' area.
>> >
>> > Sorry, I haven't a clue on this one.
>>
>> Ari, I believe this person is a f------d. How does he expect anyone to be
>> able to figure out what his structural load is
>
> 55 psf (pounds per square foot) = equates to 40 psf Top-live(1), 10 psf
> Top-dead(2), and 5 psf Bottom-dead(2). All building codes require that
> the
> stiffness factor be at least L/360 (though it's common to use L/480 to
> minimize deflection or "bouncy" floor). The OP need not worry about
> weight
> causing structural failure. The only real concern would be cosmetic (i.e.
> cracks in a finished ceiling below, cracks in grout lines of a tile floor,
> dents/scruffs in a wood floor, etc.) As a general rule of thumb, you
> almost
> never need to worry about a load until it's 750+lbs. in a 1 s.f. area
> (think
> a FAT guy standing on one leg). Anything less than that will be fine.
> Now
> if the OP is deadlifting (and dropping) 1500+lb lifts, I'd suggest he
> consult a local Structural Engineer to further address his rooms
> structural
> capabilities.
>
> (1) Live Loads are those loads that can come and go over the life of the
> structure. This would typically include people and furniture, but may
> include such things as wind, snow, and ice in roof applications. Most
> building codes require a floor system to be able to withstand 40 psf load.
> Typically, a floor system will never see full live load unless it's
> flooded
> 8-inches deep in water!
> (2) Dead Loads are the weights of the building materials used in the
> structure itself. This might include such things as the joists, subfloor,
> carpet/padding, flooring tile, acoustic tile and sheetrock.
>
>
Holy ****, Ari you sure know a thing or two about a thing or two.
What about factoring in the condition of the matierials? i.e. suppose we are
dealing with rot or termites etc affecting structural timbers?
>

Hobbes
November 17th 05, 01:50 PM
In article >,
"Lee Michaels" > wrote:

> > wrote in message
> oups.com...
> >I am considering a weight training machine to work out at home, it has
> > a pull up bar located at 82", I would like to place it inside the
> > house (ceiling : 8 ft / 96") , instead of the garage for various
> > reasons. I was wondering if a ceiling height of 8' would hinder the
> > pull up exercise. I figure my shoulders do not reach up past the
> > handle bar, and from the shoulder to top of my head should leave me
> > about 2-3" from the ceiling.
> >
> > Next question is the foundation of the home, it is crawl space
> > foundation type, the various weight machines I am looking at varies
> > from 250-350 lbs, would I need to add any reinfocements in the crawl
> > space or generally this kind of weight, plus mine (160 lbs), so figure
> > about 500 lbs loaded on around a 3'' x 5' area.
> >
> I doin't know what you are calling a machine, but almost all "machines" are
> garbage and far inferior (and much more expensive) than some basic weight
> training equipment.
>
> Almost any floor can handle this weight. This is like three of four people
> standing in close proximity.

Or yo' momma!

;^?

--
Keith

David
November 17th 05, 02:02 PM
"Hobbes" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> "Lee Michaels" > wrote:
>
>> > wrote in message
>> oups.com...
>> >I am considering a weight training machine to work out at home, it has
>> > a pull up bar located at 82", I would like to place it inside the
>> > house (ceiling : 8 ft / 96") , instead of the garage for various
>> > reasons. I was wondering if a ceiling height of 8' would hinder the
>> > pull up exercise. I figure my shoulders do not reach up past the
>> > handle bar, and from the shoulder to top of my head should leave me
>> > about 2-3" from the ceiling.
>> >
>> > Next question is the foundation of the home, it is crawl space
>> > foundation type, the various weight machines I am looking at varies
>> > from 250-350 lbs, would I need to add any reinfocements in the crawl
>> > space or generally this kind of weight, plus mine (160 lbs), so figure
>> > about 500 lbs loaded on around a 3'' x 5' area.
>> >
>> I doin't know what you are calling a machine, but almost all "machines"
>> are
>> garbage and far inferior (and much more expensive) than some basic weight
>> training equipment.
>>
>> Almost any floor can handle this weight. This is like three of four
>> people
>> standing in close proximity.
>
> Or yo' momma!
>
> ;^?

LMAO!!!

David
November 17th 05, 02:04 PM
"David" > wrote in message
u...
>
> "Spammers_Should_Be_Shot" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "David" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>>
>>> "spodosaurus" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>> > wrote:
>>> >> I am considering a weight training machine
>>> >
>>> > Which "machine"?
>>> >
>>> >> to work out at home, it has
>>> >> a pull up bar located at 82", I would like to place it inside the
>>> >> house (ceiling : 8 ft / 96") , instead of the garage for various
>>> >> reasons. I was wondering if a ceiling height of 8' would hinder
>>> >> the
>>> >> pull up exercise. I figure my shoulders do not reach up past the
>>> >> handle bar, and from the shoulder to top of my head should leave me
>>> >> about 2-3" from the ceiling.
>>> >>
>>> >
>>> > When you develop the strength to pull the bar to your chest, the tops
>>> > of
>>> > your shoulders will be above the bar. Any momentum also involved
>> increases
>>> > the experience of pain as your head impacts the ceiling.
>>> >
>>> >> Next question is the foundation of the home, it is crawl space
>>> >> foundation type, the various weight machines I am looking at varies
>>> >> from 250-350 lbs, would I need to add any reinfocements in the crawl
>>> >> space or generally this kind of weight, plus mine (160 lbs), so
>>> >> figure
>>> >> about 500 lbs loaded on around a 3'' x 5' area.
>>> >
>>> > Sorry, I haven't a clue on this one.
>>>
>>> Ari, I believe this person is a f------d. How does he expect anyone to
>>> be
>>> able to figure out what his structural load is
>>
>> 55 psf (pounds per square foot) = equates to 40 psf Top-live(1), 10 psf
>> Top-dead(2), and 5 psf Bottom-dead(2). All building codes require that
>> the
>> stiffness factor be at least L/360 (though it's common to use L/480 to
>> minimize deflection or "bouncy" floor). The OP need not worry about
>> weight
>> causing structural failure. The only real concern would be cosmetic
>> (i.e.
>> cracks in a finished ceiling below, cracks in grout lines of a tile
>> floor,
>> dents/scruffs in a wood floor, etc.) As a general rule of thumb, you
>> almost
>> never need to worry about a load until it's 750+lbs. in a 1 s.f. area
>> (think
>> a FAT guy standing on one leg). Anything less than that will be fine.
>> Now
>> if the OP is deadlifting (and dropping) 1500+lb lifts, I'd suggest he
>> consult a local Structural Engineer to further address his rooms
>> structural
>> capabilities.
>>
>> (1) Live Loads are those loads that can come and go over the life of the
>> structure. This would typically include people and furniture, but may
>> include such things as wind, snow, and ice in roof applications. Most
>> building codes require a floor system to be able to withstand 40 psf
>> load.
>> Typically, a floor system will never see full live load unless it's
>> flooded
>> 8-inches deep in water!
>> (2) Dead Loads are the weights of the building materials used in the
>> structure itself. This might include such things as the joists, subfloor,
>> carpet/padding, flooring tile, acoustic tile and sheetrock.
>>
>>
> Holy ****, Ari you sure know a thing or two about a thing or two.
> What about factoring in the condition of the matierials? i.e. suppose we
> are dealing with rot or termites etc affecting structural timbers?
>>
Sorry 'Spammers' - confused you with someone else

OmManiPadmeOmelet
November 17th 05, 03:02 PM
In article . com>,
wrote:

> I am considering a weight training machine to work out at home, it has
> a pull up bar located at 82", I would like to place it inside the
> house (ceiling : 8 ft / 96") , instead of the garage for various
> reasons. I was wondering if a ceiling height of 8' would hinder the
> pull up exercise. I figure my shoulders do not reach up past the
> handle bar, and from the shoulder to top of my head should leave me
> about 2-3" from the ceiling.
>
> Next question is the foundation of the home, it is crawl space
> foundation type, the various weight machines I am looking at varies
> from 250-350 lbs, would I need to add any reinfocements in the crawl
> space or generally this kind of weight, plus mine (160 lbs), so figure
> about 500 lbs loaded on around a 3'' x 5' area.
>
> Thanks in advance!
>

Personally, I've brace the floor just to be safe.

There are jacks made for that. Check out a mobile home supply place.
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson

Tonym
November 17th 05, 06:37 PM
I take it that you meant a 3' by 5' area, that is 15 square feet.
500#/15s.f. = 33.33 pounds per square foot. Your average house is designed
to sustain a 40 to 45 psf load on living rooms, kitchens and other public
rooms. Bedrooms on the other hand usally are about 30 to 35 psf.
Positioning of the machine also makes a difference. Near the end of the
joists is better than at the mid-span. I'd consider reinforcing the joists
below. If you have a concrete floor in your crawlspace a simple method
would be to attach a 4x4 to the joists and have it bear on the concrete.
Tony Manella
(structural designer by day, average joe by night)

> wrote in message
oups.com...
>I am considering a weight training machine to work out at home, it has
> a pull up bar located at 82", I would like to place it inside the
> house (ceiling : 8 ft / 96") , instead of the garage for various
> reasons. I was wondering if a ceiling height of 8' would hinder the
> pull up exercise. I figure my shoulders do not reach up past the
> handle bar, and from the shoulder to top of my head should leave me
> about 2-3" from the ceiling.
>
> Next question is the foundation of the home, it is crawl space
> foundation type, the various weight machines I am looking at varies
> from 250-350 lbs, would I need to add any reinfocements in the crawl
> space or generally this kind of weight, plus mine (160 lbs), so figure
> about 500 lbs loaded on around a 3'' x 5' area.
>
> Thanks in advance!
>

John
November 17th 05, 06:42 PM
"Spammers_Should_Be_Shot" > wrote in message
...
>
> "David" > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> > "spodosaurus" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > > wrote:
> > >> I am considering a weight training machine
> > >
> > > Which "machine"?
> > >
> > >> to work out at home, it has
> > >> a pull up bar located at 82", I would like to place it inside the
> > >> house (ceiling : 8 ft / 96") , instead of the garage for various
> > >> reasons. I was wondering if a ceiling height of 8' would hinder
the
> > >> pull up exercise. I figure my shoulders do not reach up past the
> > >> handle bar, and from the shoulder to top of my head should leave me
> > >> about 2-3" from the ceiling.
> > >>
> > >
> > > When you develop the strength to pull the bar to your chest, the tops
of
> > > your shoulders will be above the bar. Any momentum also involved
> increases
> > > the experience of pain as your head impacts the ceiling.
> > >
> > >> Next question is the foundation of the home, it is crawl space
> > >> foundation type, the various weight machines I am looking at varies
> > >> from 250-350 lbs, would I need to add any reinfocements in the crawl
> > >> space or generally this kind of weight, plus mine (160 lbs), so
figure
> > >> about 500 lbs loaded on around a 3'' x 5' area.
> > >
> > > Sorry, I haven't a clue on this one.
> >
> > Ari, I believe this person is a f------d. How does he expect anyone to
be
> > able to figure out what his structural load is
>
> 55 psf (pounds per square foot) = equates to 40 psf Top-live(1), 10 psf
> Top-dead(2), and 5 psf Bottom-dead(2). All building codes require that
the
> stiffness factor be at least L/360 (though it's common to use L/480 to
> minimize deflection or "bouncy" floor). The OP need not worry about
weight
> causing structural failure. The only real concern would be cosmetic (i.e.
> cracks in a finished ceiling below, cracks in grout lines of a tile floor,
> dents/scruffs in a wood floor, etc.) As a general rule of thumb, you
almost
> never need to worry about a load until it's 750+lbs. in a 1 s.f. area
(think
> a FAT guy standing on one leg). Anything less than that will be fine.
Now
> if the OP is deadlifting (and dropping) 1500+lb lifts, I'd suggest he
> consult a local Structural Engineer to further address his rooms
structural
> capabilities.

Agreed. One other problem would be if he dropped a wheel on an area of the
floor that was not supported by a joist. OSB is the common material of
choice for subfloor and a 45# plate on edge, dropped from knee height, could
easily damage it if it landed between joists. The force would be greater
than 45 psi. If he doesn't get careless with the weights, he should be fine.

Spammers_Should_Be_Shot
November 17th 05, 08:54 PM
"John" > wrote in message
...
> "Spammers_Should_Be_Shot" > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> > "David" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > >
> > > "spodosaurus" > wrote in message
> > > ...
> > > > wrote:
> > > >> I am considering a weight training machine
> > > >
> > > > Which "machine"?
> > > >
> > > >> to work out at home, it has
> > > >> a pull up bar located at 82", I would like to place it inside the
> > > >> house (ceiling : 8 ft / 96") , instead of the garage for various
> > > >> reasons. I was wondering if a ceiling height of 8' would hinder
> the
> > > >> pull up exercise. I figure my shoulders do not reach up past the
> > > >> handle bar, and from the shoulder to top of my head should leave me
> > > >> about 2-3" from the ceiling.
> > > >>
> > > >
> > > > When you develop the strength to pull the bar to your chest, the
tops
> of
> > > > your shoulders will be above the bar. Any momentum also involved
> > increases
> > > > the experience of pain as your head impacts the ceiling.
> > > >
> > > >> Next question is the foundation of the home, it is crawl space
> > > >> foundation type, the various weight machines I am looking at varies
> > > >> from 250-350 lbs, would I need to add any reinfocements in the
crawl
> > > >> space or generally this kind of weight, plus mine (160 lbs), so
> figure
> > > >> about 500 lbs loaded on around a 3'' x 5' area.
> > > >
> > > > Sorry, I haven't a clue on this one.
> > >
> > > Ari, I believe this person is a f------d. How does he expect anyone to
> be
> > > able to figure out what his structural load is
> >
> > 55 psf (pounds per square foot) = equates to 40 psf Top-live(1), 10 psf
> > Top-dead(2), and 5 psf Bottom-dead(2). All building codes require that
> the
> > stiffness factor be at least L/360 (though it's common to use L/480 to
> > minimize deflection or "bouncy" floor). The OP need not worry about
> weight
> > causing structural failure. The only real concern would be cosmetic
(i.e.
> > cracks in a finished ceiling below, cracks in grout lines of a tile
floor,
> > dents/scruffs in a wood floor, etc.) As a general rule of thumb, you
> almost
> > never need to worry about a load until it's 750+lbs. in a 1 s.f. area
> (think
> > a FAT guy standing on one leg). Anything less than that will be fine.
> Now
> > if the OP is deadlifting (and dropping) 1500+lb lifts, I'd suggest he
> > consult a local Structural Engineer to further address his rooms
> structural
> > capabilities.
>
> Agreed. One other problem would be if he dropped a wheel on an area of the
> floor that was not supported by a joist. OSB is the common material of
> choice for subfloor and a 45# plate on edge, dropped from knee height,
could
> easily damage it if it landed between joists. The force would be greater
> than 45 psi. If he doesn't get careless with the weights, he should be
fine.
>

Granted that would result in a "point load" however the floor would still be
fine (other than possible cosmetic damage). The subfloor (OSB or T&G
plywood are the most common) is usually 3/4" (sometimes the floor may
consist of 2 layers - but 3/4" is a minimum). The subfloor will take the
load and disperse it to a larger area than just the impact area. In any
case, dropping a plate will not pose a problem. Try this test at home,
stand on one leg, jump up and down, does your foot go through the floor?
The area of one of your feet is <1 s.f. and your weight is more than a 45#
plate. If your foot doesn't go through the floor than why would a plate?
Because it's made of steel?

I'll give another example: A typical Friday night at my house. I have a
queen "soft sided" waterbed (~800lbs.). On the bed let's say there's 600
lbs. (if I weigh 180lbs. that leaves 420lbs. for 3 fit females - and if
they're thin, maybe there's enough left over to allow a midget to join in).
Also, any weight being supported by the swing wouldn't count. So we have a
live load total of 800+600=1400lbs. The bed area is ~5'x7'=35s.f. Keep in
mind that the total load is being distributed over an area much greater than
35s.f. (i.e. adjacent joists are carrying a portion of the weight as
distributed by the subfloor). For "worst case scenario let's say the weight
WAS all compacted into the 35s.f. At a designed load of 40lbs. per s.f.
that would be 35s.f. x 40psf = 1400 lbs. So it would support the weight
fine. Also keep in mind that the floor is designed to carry the live load
with acceptable deflection (usually less than 1/2" of deflection/bend).
Exceeding the load doesn't necessarily mean immediate structural failure
(i.e. the bed and party goers end up in the basement). As the load goes up
the floor "flexes" more, up until the point of failure (the actual point of
failure depends upon a lot of factors but let's just say it's quite a bit
more).

Now to look further at my situation, my floor joists are spanning 13' and
are 16" o.c. (so the bed is bearing on 4 joist spans). So the floor area
the bed is located in is designed for a minimal deflection in an area of
13'x5.33'. 13x5.33 = ~69s.f. x 40psf (live load) = 2760 total lbs. in that
area. So in the above "Friday Night" example the 1400lbs. load (bed and
occupants) would still leave us with 1360lbs. of load before deflection
became unacceptable. So if the remaining load (1360lbs.) is spectators
(each 272lbs.) I could have 5 of them standing at the foot of the bed.
(BTW, the average 272lb. person is going to utilize ~6s.f.). So, (rounding
off the numbers) the area is 69s.f. (of which the bed is 37s.f. and the
spectators are 30s.f.). And the floor is designed to carry this weight. To
actually induce structural failure we'd have to start stacking spectators
vertically.

Now, here's an example of a structural failure that's not too uncommon.
Decks. Decks are not always designed to carry as heavy a live load and
being exposed to the elements can lead to degradation of the structural
members. Also, in areas with seismic movement or frost lines, footings can
"heave" which can cause problems. Another big factor leading to deck
failure is shoddy construction, either materials or methods, or both.
Put an 8 person hot tub on the deck, which can weigh 3500lbs.
(tub+water+people) all in an area of 7'x7' and you can start to see how it
can fail. Decks can also fail due to too many people on them at once. If a
fraternity house packs 50 people onto a 150s.f. deck you're asking for
trouble.

Steve Freides
November 17th 05, 09:01 PM
"Spammers_Should_Be_Shot" > wrote in message
...
>
> "John" > wrote in message
> ...
>> "Spammers_Should_Be_Shot" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> >
>> > "David" > wrote in message
>> > ...
>> > >
>> > > "spodosaurus" > wrote in message
>> > > ...
>> > > > wrote:
>> > > >> I am considering a weight training machine
>> > > >
>> > > > Which "machine"?
>> > > >
>> > > >> to work out at home, it has
>> > > >> a pull up bar located at 82", I would like to place it inside
>> > > >> the
>> > > >> house (ceiling : 8 ft / 96") , instead of the garage for
>> > > >> various
>> > > >> reasons. I was wondering if a ceiling height of 8' would
>> > > >> hinder
>> the
>> > > >> pull up exercise. I figure my shoulders do not reach up past
>> > > >> the
>> > > >> handle bar, and from the shoulder to top of my head should
>> > > >> leave me
>> > > >> about 2-3" from the ceiling.
>> > > >>
>> > > >
>> > > > When you develop the strength to pull the bar to your chest,
>> > > > the
> tops
>> of
>> > > > your shoulders will be above the bar. Any momentum also
>> > > > involved
>> > increases
>> > > > the experience of pain as your head impacts the ceiling.
>> > > >
>> > > >> Next question is the foundation of the home, it is crawl space
>> > > >> foundation type, the various weight machines I am looking at
>> > > >> varies
>> > > >> from 250-350 lbs, would I need to add any reinfocements in the
> crawl
>> > > >> space or generally this kind of weight, plus mine (160 lbs),
>> > > >> so
>> figure
>> > > >> about 500 lbs loaded on around a 3'' x 5' area.
>> > > >
>> > > > Sorry, I haven't a clue on this one.
>> > >
>> > > Ari, I believe this person is a f------d. How does he expect
>> > > anyone to
>> be
>> > > able to figure out what his structural load is
>> >
>> > 55 psf (pounds per square foot) = equates to 40 psf Top-live(1), 10
>> > psf
>> > Top-dead(2), and 5 psf Bottom-dead(2). All building codes require
>> > that
>> the
>> > stiffness factor be at least L/360 (though it's common to use L/480
>> > to
>> > minimize deflection or "bouncy" floor). The OP need not worry
>> > about
>> weight
>> > causing structural failure. The only real concern would be
>> > cosmetic
> (i.e.
>> > cracks in a finished ceiling below, cracks in grout lines of a tile
> floor,
>> > dents/scruffs in a wood floor, etc.) As a general rule of thumb,
>> > you
>> almost
>> > never need to worry about a load until it's 750+lbs. in a 1 s.f.
>> > area
>> (think
>> > a FAT guy standing on one leg). Anything less than that will be
>> > fine.
>> Now
>> > if the OP is deadlifting (and dropping) 1500+lb lifts, I'd suggest
>> > he
>> > consult a local Structural Engineer to further address his rooms
>> structural
>> > capabilities.
>>
>> Agreed. One other problem would be if he dropped a wheel on an area
>> of the
>> floor that was not supported by a joist. OSB is the common material
>> of
>> choice for subfloor and a 45# plate on edge, dropped from knee
>> height,
> could
>> easily damage it if it landed between joists. The force would be
>> greater
>> than 45 psi. If he doesn't get careless with the weights, he should
>> be
> fine.
>>
>
> Granted that would result in a "point load" however the floor would
> still be
> fine (other than possible cosmetic damage). The subfloor (OSB or T&G
> plywood are the most common) is usually 3/4" (sometimes the floor may
> consist of 2 layers - but 3/4" is a minimum). The subfloor will take
> the
> load and disperse it to a larger area than just the impact area. In
> any
> case, dropping a plate will not pose a problem. Try this test at
> home,
> stand on one leg, jump up and down, does your foot go through the
> floor?
> The area of one of your feet is <1 s.f. and your weight is more than a
> 45#
> plate. If your foot doesn't go through the floor than why would a
> plate?
> Because it's made of steel?
>
> I'll give another example: A typical Friday night at my house. I
> have a
> queen "soft sided" waterbed (~800lbs.). On the bed let's say there's
> 600
> lbs. (if I weigh 180lbs. that leaves 420lbs. for 3 fit females - and
> if
> they're thin, maybe there's enough left over to allow a midget to join
> in).
> Also, any weight being supported by the swing wouldn't count. So we
> have a
> live load total of 800+600=1400lbs. The bed area is ~5'x7'=35s.f.
> Keep in
> mind that the total load is being distributed over an area much
> greater than
> 35s.f. (i.e. adjacent joists are carrying a portion of the weight as
> distributed by the subfloor). For "worst case scenario let's say the
> weight
> WAS all compacted into the 35s.f. At a designed load of 40lbs. per
> s.f.
> that would be 35s.f. x 40psf = 1400 lbs. So it would support the
> weight
> fine. Also keep in mind that the floor is designed to carry the live
> load
> with acceptable deflection (usually less than 1/2" of
> deflection/bend).
> Exceeding the load doesn't necessarily mean immediate structural
> failure
> (i.e. the bed and party goers end up in the basement). As the load
> goes up
> the floor "flexes" more, up until the point of failure (the actual
> point of
> failure depends upon a lot of factors but let's just say it's quite a
> bit
> more).
>
> Now to look further at my situation, my floor joists are spanning 13'
> and
> are 16" o.c. (so the bed is bearing on 4 joist spans). So the floor
> area
> the bed is located in is designed for a minimal deflection in an area
> of
> 13'x5.33'. 13x5.33 = ~69s.f. x 40psf (live load) = 2760 total lbs. in
> that
> area. So in the above "Friday Night" example the 1400lbs. load (bed
> and
> occupants) would still leave us with 1360lbs. of load before
> deflection
> became unacceptable. So if the remaining load (1360lbs.) is
> spectators
> (each 272lbs.) I could have 5 of them standing at the foot of the bed.
> (BTW, the average 272lb. person is going to utilize ~6s.f.). So,
> (rounding
> off the numbers) the area is 69s.f. (of which the bed is 37s.f. and
> the
> spectators are 30s.f.). And the floor is designed to carry this
> weight. To
> actually induce structural failure we'd have to start stacking
> spectators
> vertically.
>
> Now, here's an example of a structural failure that's not too
> uncommon.
> Decks. Decks are not always designed to carry as heavy a live load
> and
> being exposed to the elements can lead to degradation of the
> structural
> members. Also, in areas with seismic movement or frost lines,
> footings can
> "heave" which can cause problems. Another big factor leading to deck
> failure is shoddy construction, either materials or methods, or both.
> Put an 8 person hot tub on the deck, which can weigh 3500lbs.
> (tub+water+people) all in an area of 7'x7' and you can start to see
> how it
> can fail. Decks can also fail due to too many people on them at once.
> If a
> fraternity house packs 50 people onto a 150s.f. deck you're asking for
> trouble.

If you drop a squat onto the pins, would the load be in the four points
of contact under the rack legs, and not distributed as in the other
examples you gave?

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com

John
November 17th 05, 09:19 PM
"Spammers_Should_Be_Shot" > wrote in message
...
>
> "John" > wrote in message
> ...
> > "Spammers_Should_Be_Shot" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > >
> > > "David" > wrote in message
> > > ...
> > > >
> > > > "spodosaurus" > wrote in message
> > > > ...
> > > > > wrote:
> > > > >> I am considering a weight training machine
> > > > >
> > > > > Which "machine"?
> > > > >
> > > > >> to work out at home, it has
> > > > >> a pull up bar located at 82", I would like to place it inside
the
> > > > >> house (ceiling : 8 ft / 96") , instead of the garage for various
> > > > >> reasons. I was wondering if a ceiling height of 8' would
hinder
> > the
> > > > >> pull up exercise. I figure my shoulders do not reach up past the
> > > > >> handle bar, and from the shoulder to top of my head should leave
me
> > > > >> about 2-3" from the ceiling.
> > > > >>
> > > > >
> > > > > When you develop the strength to pull the bar to your chest, the
> tops
> > of
> > > > > your shoulders will be above the bar. Any momentum also involved
> > > increases
> > > > > the experience of pain as your head impacts the ceiling.
> > > > >
> > > > >> Next question is the foundation of the home, it is crawl space
> > > > >> foundation type, the various weight machines I am looking at
varies
> > > > >> from 250-350 lbs, would I need to add any reinfocements in the
> crawl
> > > > >> space or generally this kind of weight, plus mine (160 lbs), so
> > figure
> > > > >> about 500 lbs loaded on around a 3'' x 5' area.
> > > > >
> > > > > Sorry, I haven't a clue on this one.
> > > >
> > > > Ari, I believe this person is a f------d. How does he expect anyone
to
> > be
> > > > able to figure out what his structural load is
> > >
> > > 55 psf (pounds per square foot) = equates to 40 psf Top-live(1), 10
psf
> > > Top-dead(2), and 5 psf Bottom-dead(2). All building codes require
that
> > the
> > > stiffness factor be at least L/360 (though it's common to use L/480 to
> > > minimize deflection or "bouncy" floor). The OP need not worry about
> > weight
> > > causing structural failure. The only real concern would be cosmetic
> (i.e.
> > > cracks in a finished ceiling below, cracks in grout lines of a tile
> floor,
> > > dents/scruffs in a wood floor, etc.) As a general rule of thumb, you
> > almost
> > > never need to worry about a load until it's 750+lbs. in a 1 s.f. area
> > (think
> > > a FAT guy standing on one leg). Anything less than that will be fine.
> > Now
> > > if the OP is deadlifting (and dropping) 1500+lb lifts, I'd suggest he
> > > consult a local Structural Engineer to further address his rooms
> > structural
> > > capabilities.
> >
> > Agreed. One other problem would be if he dropped a wheel on an area of
the
> > floor that was not supported by a joist. OSB is the common material of
> > choice for subfloor and a 45# plate on edge, dropped from knee height,
> could
> > easily damage it if it landed between joists. The force would be greater
> > than 45 psi. If he doesn't get careless with the weights, he should be
> fine.
> >
>
> Granted that would result in a "point load" however the floor would still
be
> fine (other than possible cosmetic damage). The subfloor (OSB or T&G
> plywood are the most common) is usually 3/4" (sometimes the floor may
> consist of 2 layers - but 3/4" is a minimum). The subfloor will take the
> load and disperse it to a larger area than just the impact area. In any
> case, dropping a plate will not pose a problem. Try this test at home,
> stand on one leg, jump up and down, does your foot go through the floor?
> The area of one of your feet is <1 s.f. and your weight is more than a 45#
> plate. If your foot doesn't go through the floor than why would a plate?
> Because it's made of steel?

I was only speaking cosmetically. The joists would be fine. The OSB would
probably be damaged. The edge of a wheel is <1 in^2. My civil/structural
engineering is a bit rusty, as I'm a lowly metallurgical engineer. :^)

Spammers_Should_Be_Shot
November 18th 05, 01:40 AM
"Steve Freides" > wrote in message
...
> "Spammers_Should_Be_Shot" > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> > "John" > wrote in message
> > ...
> >> "Spammers_Should_Be_Shot" > wrote in message
> >> ...
> >> >
> >> > "David" > wrote in message
> >> > ...
> >> > >
> >> > > "spodosaurus" > wrote in message
> >> > > ...
> >> > > > wrote:
> >> > > >> I am considering a weight training machine
> >> > > >
> >> > > > Which "machine"?
> >> > > >
> >> > > >> to work out at home, it has
> >> > > >> a pull up bar located at 82", I would like to place it inside
> >> > > >> the
> >> > > >> house (ceiling : 8 ft / 96") , instead of the garage for
> >> > > >> various
> >> > > >> reasons. I was wondering if a ceiling height of 8' would
> >> > > >> hinder
> >> the
> >> > > >> pull up exercise. I figure my shoulders do not reach up past
> >> > > >> the
> >> > > >> handle bar, and from the shoulder to top of my head should
> >> > > >> leave me
> >> > > >> about 2-3" from the ceiling.
> >> > > >>
> >> > > >
> >> > > > When you develop the strength to pull the bar to your chest,
> >> > > > the
> > tops
> >> of
> >> > > > your shoulders will be above the bar. Any momentum also
> >> > > > involved
> >> > increases
> >> > > > the experience of pain as your head impacts the ceiling.
> >> > > >
> >> > > >> Next question is the foundation of the home, it is crawl space
> >> > > >> foundation type, the various weight machines I am looking at
> >> > > >> varies
> >> > > >> from 250-350 lbs, would I need to add any reinfocements in the
> > crawl
> >> > > >> space or generally this kind of weight, plus mine (160 lbs),
> >> > > >> so
> >> figure
> >> > > >> about 500 lbs loaded on around a 3'' x 5' area.
> >> > > >
> >> > > > Sorry, I haven't a clue on this one.
> >> > >
> >> > > Ari, I believe this person is a f------d. How does he expect
> >> > > anyone to
> >> be
> >> > > able to figure out what his structural load is
> >> >
> >> > 55 psf (pounds per square foot) = equates to 40 psf Top-live(1), 10
> >> > psf
> >> > Top-dead(2), and 5 psf Bottom-dead(2). All building codes require
> >> > that
> >> the
> >> > stiffness factor be at least L/360 (though it's common to use L/480
> >> > to
> >> > minimize deflection or "bouncy" floor). The OP need not worry
> >> > about
> >> weight
> >> > causing structural failure. The only real concern would be
> >> > cosmetic
> > (i.e.
> >> > cracks in a finished ceiling below, cracks in grout lines of a tile
> > floor,
> >> > dents/scruffs in a wood floor, etc.) As a general rule of thumb,
> >> > you
> >> almost
> >> > never need to worry about a load until it's 750+lbs. in a 1 s.f.
> >> > area
> >> (think
> >> > a FAT guy standing on one leg). Anything less than that will be
> >> > fine.
> >> Now
> >> > if the OP is deadlifting (and dropping) 1500+lb lifts, I'd suggest
> >> > he
> >> > consult a local Structural Engineer to further address his rooms
> >> structural
> >> > capabilities.
> >>
> >> Agreed. One other problem would be if he dropped a wheel on an area
> >> of the
> >> floor that was not supported by a joist. OSB is the common material
> >> of
> >> choice for subfloor and a 45# plate on edge, dropped from knee
> >> height,
> > could
> >> easily damage it if it landed between joists. The force would be
> >> greater
> >> than 45 psi. If he doesn't get careless with the weights, he should
> >> be
> > fine.
> >>
> >
> > Granted that would result in a "point load" however the floor would
> > still be
> > fine (other than possible cosmetic damage). The subfloor (OSB or T&G
> > plywood are the most common) is usually 3/4" (sometimes the floor may
> > consist of 2 layers - but 3/4" is a minimum). The subfloor will take
> > the
> > load and disperse it to a larger area than just the impact area. In
> > any
> > case, dropping a plate will not pose a problem. Try this test at
> > home,
> > stand on one leg, jump up and down, does your foot go through the
> > floor?
> > The area of one of your feet is <1 s.f. and your weight is more than a
> > 45#
> > plate. If your foot doesn't go through the floor than why would a
> > plate?
> > Because it's made of steel?
> >
> > I'll give another example: A typical Friday night at my house. I
> > have a
> > queen "soft sided" waterbed (~800lbs.). On the bed let's say there's
> > 600
> > lbs. (if I weigh 180lbs. that leaves 420lbs. for 3 fit females - and
> > if
> > they're thin, maybe there's enough left over to allow a midget to join
> > in).
> > Also, any weight being supported by the swing wouldn't count. So we
> > have a
> > live load total of 800+600=1400lbs. The bed area is ~5'x7'=35s.f.
> > Keep in
> > mind that the total load is being distributed over an area much
> > greater than
> > 35s.f. (i.e. adjacent joists are carrying a portion of the weight as
> > distributed by the subfloor). For "worst case scenario let's say the
> > weight
> > WAS all compacted into the 35s.f. At a designed load of 40lbs. per
> > s.f.
> > that would be 35s.f. x 40psf = 1400 lbs. So it would support the
> > weight
> > fine. Also keep in mind that the floor is designed to carry the live
> > load
> > with acceptable deflection (usually less than 1/2" of
> > deflection/bend).
> > Exceeding the load doesn't necessarily mean immediate structural
> > failure
> > (i.e. the bed and party goers end up in the basement). As the load
> > goes up
> > the floor "flexes" more, up until the point of failure (the actual
> > point of
> > failure depends upon a lot of factors but let's just say it's quite a
> > bit
> > more).
> >
> > Now to look further at my situation, my floor joists are spanning 13'
> > and
> > are 16" o.c. (so the bed is bearing on 4 joist spans). So the floor
> > area
> > the bed is located in is designed for a minimal deflection in an area
> > of
> > 13'x5.33'. 13x5.33 = ~69s.f. x 40psf (live load) = 2760 total lbs. in
> > that
> > area. So in the above "Friday Night" example the 1400lbs. load (bed
> > and
> > occupants) would still leave us with 1360lbs. of load before
> > deflection
> > became unacceptable. So if the remaining load (1360lbs.) is
> > spectators
> > (each 272lbs.) I could have 5 of them standing at the foot of the bed.
> > (BTW, the average 272lb. person is going to utilize ~6s.f.). So,
> > (rounding
> > off the numbers) the area is 69s.f. (of which the bed is 37s.f. and
> > the
> > spectators are 30s.f.). And the floor is designed to carry this
> > weight. To
> > actually induce structural failure we'd have to start stacking
> > spectators
> > vertically.
> >
> > Now, here's an example of a structural failure that's not too
> > uncommon.
> > Decks. Decks are not always designed to carry as heavy a live load
> > and
> > being exposed to the elements can lead to degradation of the
> > structural
> > members. Also, in areas with seismic movement or frost lines,
> > footings can
> > "heave" which can cause problems. Another big factor leading to deck
> > failure is shoddy construction, either materials or methods, or both.
> > Put an 8 person hot tub on the deck, which can weigh 3500lbs.
> > (tub+water+people) all in an area of 7'x7' and you can start to see
> > how it
> > can fail. Decks can also fail due to too many people on them at once.
> > If a
> > fraternity house packs 50 people onto a 150s.f. deck you're asking for
> > trouble.
>
> If you drop a squat onto the pins, would the load be in the four points
> of contact under the rack legs, and not distributed as in the other
> examples you gave?
>
> -S-
> http://www.kbnj.com
>
>

Spammers_Should_Be_Shot
November 18th 05, 02:07 AM
"Steve Freides" > wrote in message
...
> "Spammers_Should_Be_Shot" > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> > "John" > wrote in message
> > ...
> >> "Spammers_Should_Be_Shot" > wrote in message
> >> ...
> >> >
> >> > "David" > wrote in message
> >> > ...
> >> > >
> >> > > "spodosaurus" > wrote in message
> >> > > ...
> >> > > > wrote:
> >> > > >> I am considering a weight training machine
> >> > > >
> >> > > > Which "machine"?
> >> > > >
> >> > > >> to work out at home, it has
> >> > > >> a pull up bar located at 82", I would like to place it inside
> >> > > >> the
> >> > > >> house (ceiling : 8 ft / 96") , instead of the garage for
> >> > > >> various
> >> > > >> reasons. I was wondering if a ceiling height of 8' would
> >> > > >> hinder
> >> the
> >> > > >> pull up exercise. I figure my shoulders do not reach up past
> >> > > >> the
> >> > > >> handle bar, and from the shoulder to top of my head should
> >> > > >> leave me
> >> > > >> about 2-3" from the ceiling.
> >> > > >>
> >> > > >
> >> > > > When you develop the strength to pull the bar to your chest,
> >> > > > the
> > tops
> >> of
> >> > > > your shoulders will be above the bar. Any momentum also
> >> > > > involved
> >> > increases
> >> > > > the experience of pain as your head impacts the ceiling.
> >> > > >
> >> > > >> Next question is the foundation of the home, it is crawl space
> >> > > >> foundation type, the various weight machines I am looking at
> >> > > >> varies
> >> > > >> from 250-350 lbs, would I need to add any reinfocements in the
> > crawl
> >> > > >> space or generally this kind of weight, plus mine (160 lbs),
> >> > > >> so
> >> figure
> >> > > >> about 500 lbs loaded on around a 3'' x 5' area.
> >> > > >
> >> > > > Sorry, I haven't a clue on this one.
> >> > >
> >> > > Ari, I believe this person is a f------d. How does he expect
> >> > > anyone to
> >> be
> >> > > able to figure out what his structural load is
> >> >
> >> > 55 psf (pounds per square foot) = equates to 40 psf Top-live(1), 10
> >> > psf
> >> > Top-dead(2), and 5 psf Bottom-dead(2). All building codes require
> >> > that
> >> the
> >> > stiffness factor be at least L/360 (though it's common to use L/480
> >> > to
> >> > minimize deflection or "bouncy" floor). The OP need not worry
> >> > about
> >> weight
> >> > causing structural failure. The only real concern would be
> >> > cosmetic
> > (i.e.
> >> > cracks in a finished ceiling below, cracks in grout lines of a tile
> > floor,
> >> > dents/scruffs in a wood floor, etc.) As a general rule of thumb,
> >> > you
> >> almost
> >> > never need to worry about a load until it's 750+lbs. in a 1 s.f.
> >> > area
> >> (think
> >> > a FAT guy standing on one leg). Anything less than that will be
> >> > fine.
> >> Now
> >> > if the OP is deadlifting (and dropping) 1500+lb lifts, I'd suggest
> >> > he
> >> > consult a local Structural Engineer to further address his rooms
> >> structural
> >> > capabilities.
> >>
> >> Agreed. One other problem would be if he dropped a wheel on an area
> >> of the
> >> floor that was not supported by a joist. OSB is the common material
> >> of
> >> choice for subfloor and a 45# plate on edge, dropped from knee
> >> height,
> > could
> >> easily damage it if it landed between joists. The force would be
> >> greater
> >> than 45 psi. If he doesn't get careless with the weights, he should
> >> be
> > fine.
> >>
> >
> > Granted that would result in a "point load" however the floor would
> > still be
> > fine (other than possible cosmetic damage). The subfloor (OSB or T&G
> > plywood are the most common) is usually 3/4" (sometimes the floor may
> > consist of 2 layers - but 3/4" is a minimum). The subfloor will take
> > the
> > load and disperse it to a larger area than just the impact area. In
> > any
> > case, dropping a plate will not pose a problem. Try this test at
> > home,
> > stand on one leg, jump up and down, does your foot go through the
> > floor?
> > The area of one of your feet is <1 s.f. and your weight is more than a
> > 45#
> > plate. If your foot doesn't go through the floor than why would a
> > plate?
> > Because it's made of steel?
> >
> > I'll give another example: A typical Friday night at my house. I
> > have a
> > queen "soft sided" waterbed (~800lbs.). On the bed let's say there's
> > 600
> > lbs. (if I weigh 180lbs. that leaves 420lbs. for 3 fit females - and
> > if
> > they're thin, maybe there's enough left over to allow a midget to join
> > in).
> > Also, any weight being supported by the swing wouldn't count. So we
> > have a
> > live load total of 800+600=1400lbs. The bed area is ~5'x7'=35s.f.
> > Keep in
> > mind that the total load is being distributed over an area much
> > greater than
> > 35s.f. (i.e. adjacent joists are carrying a portion of the weight as
> > distributed by the subfloor). For "worst case scenario let's say the
> > weight
> > WAS all compacted into the 35s.f. At a designed load of 40lbs. per
> > s.f.
> > that would be 35s.f. x 40psf = 1400 lbs. So it would support the
> > weight
> > fine. Also keep in mind that the floor is designed to carry the live
> > load
> > with acceptable deflection (usually less than 1/2" of
> > deflection/bend).
> > Exceeding the load doesn't necessarily mean immediate structural
> > failure
> > (i.e. the bed and party goers end up in the basement). As the load
> > goes up
> > the floor "flexes" more, up until the point of failure (the actual
> > point of
> > failure depends upon a lot of factors but let's just say it's quite a
> > bit
> > more).
> >
> > Now to look further at my situation, my floor joists are spanning 13'
> > and
> > are 16" o.c. (so the bed is bearing on 4 joist spans). So the floor
> > area
> > the bed is located in is designed for a minimal deflection in an area
> > of
> > 13'x5.33'. 13x5.33 = ~69s.f. x 40psf (live load) = 2760 total lbs. in
> > that
> > area. So in the above "Friday Night" example the 1400lbs. load (bed
> > and
> > occupants) would still leave us with 1360lbs. of load before
> > deflection
> > became unacceptable. So if the remaining load (1360lbs.) is
> > spectators
> > (each 272lbs.) I could have 5 of them standing at the foot of the bed.
> > (BTW, the average 272lb. person is going to utilize ~6s.f.). So,
> > (rounding
> > off the numbers) the area is 69s.f. (of which the bed is 37s.f. and
> > the
> > spectators are 30s.f.). And the floor is designed to carry this
> > weight. To
> > actually induce structural failure we'd have to start stacking
> > spectators
> > vertically.
> >
> > Now, here's an example of a structural failure that's not too
> > uncommon.
> > Decks. Decks are not always designed to carry as heavy a live load
> > and
> > being exposed to the elements can lead to degradation of the
> > structural
> > members. Also, in areas with seismic movement or frost lines,
> > footings can
> > "heave" which can cause problems. Another big factor leading to deck
> > failure is shoddy construction, either materials or methods, or both.
> > Put an 8 person hot tub on the deck, which can weigh 3500lbs.
> > (tub+water+people) all in an area of 7'x7' and you can start to see
> > how it
> > can fail. Decks can also fail due to too many people on them at once.
> > If a
> > fraternity house packs 50 people onto a 150s.f. deck you're asking for
> > trouble.
>
> If you drop a squat onto the pins, would the load be in the four points
> of contact under the rack legs, and not distributed as in the other
> examples you gave?
>

The load would be concentrated to the points where the rack rest on the
floor (not just the 4 corners, they are distributing the weight to the racks
cross members). Just like in the "bed" example the weight is distributed to
the bed legs (9 in the case of my bed). But the subfloor takes that weight
and distributes it over a much wider area. Let's take the example of a
person jumping and compare it to dropping a DL. If a 400lb. man jumps up
and lands on 2 feet everything would be fine (agreed?) So a 400lb. bar
dropped is different how? Now let's consider an 800lb. DL. There are 2
contact points with the floor (each roughly the same size as a persons
foot). So it'd be roughly equal to an 800lb. man jumping (or 2 400lb. men
jumping). The biggest difference between a man jumping and a bar being
dropped is the impact point spacing. A bar will hit the floor with wider
impact spacing, thus distributing the load over an even greater area ( and
therefore, more joists to carry the load).

Of course, at some point the subfloor will fail, but unless someone's
dropping 750+ lbs. it's not worth worrying about. Over 750lbs. and it might
be fine, but best to consult an engineer or architect to look at your actual
structural issues.

Dally
November 18th 05, 07:32 PM
Spammers_Should_Be_Shot wrote:

> I'll give another example: A typical Friday night at my house. I have a
> queen "soft sided" waterbed (~800lbs.). On the bed let's say there's 600
> lbs. (if I weigh 180lbs. that leaves 420lbs. for 3 fit females - and if
> they're thin, maybe there's enough left over to allow a midget to join in).
> Also, any weight being supported by the swing wouldn't count. So we have a
> live load total of 800+600=1400lbs. The bed area is ~5'x7'=35s.f. Keep in
> mind that the total load is being distributed over an area much greater than
> 35s.f. (i.e. adjacent joists are carrying a portion of the weight as
> distributed by the subfloor). For "worst case scenario let's say the weight
> WAS all compacted into the 35s.f. At a designed load of 40lbs. per s.f.
> that would be 35s.f. x 40psf = 1400 lbs. So it would support the weight
> fine.

<golf clap>

It's always nice to see a finely honed engineering mind applied to real
problems.

Dally