PDA

View Full Version : Lifting & Running (1mi and 2 mi) Offseason - Books or Articles?


JDusty4
November 4th 03, 10:06 PM
Hi,
I've always liked lifting but stopped doing it seriously for my cross
country season (I moved to high reps and less frequency as well as fewer
exercises, as well as cutting out completely any leg movements) However I am
interested in learning how lifting can fit in with running and how one can
use lifting in a beneficial way. Anything I've ever seen so far has simply
been generic advice such as "Do 8-12 reps..." - i.e., not *really*
running-specific. Does anyone have any specific advice - preferably for
middle distance (1 mi and 2 mi)? Is it good to do squats/upper body lifts in
offseason, should one build up to higher intensity during the season as part
of periodization or just the reverse? Any references to articles or book
suggestions would be highly appreciated. Thanks.

Steve Freides
November 5th 03, 01:31 AM
JDusty4 wrote:
>
> Hi,
> I've always liked lifting but stopped doing it seriously for my cross
> country season (I moved to high reps and less frequency as well as fewer
> exercises, as well as cutting out completely any leg movements) However I am
> interested in learning how lifting can fit in with running and how one can
> use lifting in a beneficial way. Anything I've ever seen so far has simply
> been generic advice such as "Do 8-12 reps..." - i.e., not *really*
> running-specific. Does anyone have any specific advice - preferably for
> middle distance (1 mi and 2 mi)? Is it good to do squats/upper body lifts in
> offseason, should one build up to higher intensity during the season as part
> of periodization or just the reverse? Any references to articles or book
> suggestions would be highly appreciated. Thanks.

Ask also on news:rec.running, but get a copy of "Explosive Running" by
Michael Yessis. It's a book many, including me, consider the Bible when
it comes to running, and it discusses resistance training specifically
help running performance.

Your basic idea of lifting only in the off-season isn't a bad one, you
know. I don't know about you, but particularly for the distances you're
running, there is a fair bit of upper body involvement - not as much as
sprints but certainly more than the 5k and up crowd. Even if you avoid
legs you'll still have to be careful not to overtrain.

If I were you, I'd experiment with heavy lifting only after running, not
before. (Yessis talks about the kind of lifting that's good to do
before, BTW, but it's not heavy.) If you have any really easy running
days, you could try lifting first on those days then running later in
the day.

For exercises, I think pullups/chinups would get my vote - great upper
body exercise you can do without tiring your legs. If you're built like
most runners you can probably do a few already.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com

November 5th 03, 01:14 PM
Steve Freides wrote:

> JDusty4 wrote:
> >
> > Hi,
> >Ask also on news:rec.running, but get a copy of "Explosive Running" by
> Michael Yessis. It's a book many, including me, consider the Bible when
> it comes to running, and it discusses resistance training specifically

> help running performance.

I was running 5 to 10K most days, no problems. About 7 minute
miles in my late 40s.

That book was highly inspirational and highly recommended. I got it.
I became convinced I need to change my gait. I spent just 15 minutes
on the treadmill practicing landing mid foot rather than on my heel.

The result, partially torn ligaments in my foot.

Read with a grain of salt and be careful!

Bob

Steve Freides
November 5th 03, 03:11 PM
Beach, wrote:
>
> Steve Freides wrote:
>
> > JDusty4 wrote:
> > >
> > > Hi,
> > >Ask also on news:rec.running, but get a copy of "Explosive Running" by
> > Michael Yessis. It's a book many, including me, consider the Bible when
> > it comes to running, and it discusses resistance training specifically
>
> > help running performance.
>
> I was running 5 to 10K most days, no problems. About 7 minute
> miles in my late 40s.
>
> That book was highly inspirational and highly recommended. I got it.
> I became convinced I need to change my gait. I spent just 15 minutes
> on the treadmill practicing landing mid foot rather than on my heel.
>
> The result, partially torn ligaments in my foot.
>
> Read with a grain of salt and be careful!

No change like that should be done overnight. I switched very
gradually, starting with one shorter run per week done in racing flats
and at a higher speed and gradually building up from there. The way to
change your gait is to think about landing with your foot underneath
your center of gravity instead of in front of it. Yessis actually
discusses the fact that everyone won't land on their forefoot due to leg
length and other variables. The point of his book is to land in such a
manner that you're not braking then restarting with each step, which is
what landing heel first will do. As long as you've got the basic
concept right, the exact footstrike isn't important to focus on - it
will take care of itself.

http://www.dragondoor.com/cgi-bin/tpost.pl?smessage=128214

for a post of mine on this subject in which I go into more detail.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com

> Bob

November 5th 03, 09:42 PM
Steve Freides wrote:

> Beach, wrote:
> >
> > Steve Freides wrote:
> >
> > > JDusty4 wrote:
> > > >
> > > > Hi,
> > > >Ask also on news:rec.running, but get a copy of "Explosive Running" by
> > > Michael Yessis. It's a book many, including me, consider the Bible when
> > > it comes to running, and it discusses resistance training specifically
> >
> > > help running performance.
> >
> > I was running 5 to 10K most days, no problems. About 7 minute
> > miles in my late 40s.
> >
> > That book was highly inspirational and highly recommended. I got it.
> > I became convinced I need to change my gait. I spent just 15 minutes
> > on the treadmill practicing landing mid foot rather than on my heel.
> >
> > The result, partially torn ligaments in my foot.
> >
> > Read with a grain of salt and be careful!
>
> No change like that should be done overnight.





> I switched very
> gradually, starting with one shorter run per week done in racing flats
> and at a higher speed and gradually building up from there. The way to
> change your gait is to think about landing with your foot underneath
> your center of gravity instead of in front of it. Yessis actually
>

Well, I usually was running for an hour or more, so 15 minutes seemed
like a short time. Maybe 3 minutes would have been a lot smarter!


I think a coach would have helped.

> discusses the fact that everyone won't land on their forefoot due to leg
> length and other variables. The point of his book is to land in such a
> manner that you're not braking then restarting with each step, which is
> what landing heel first will do. As long as you've got the basic
> concept right, the exact footstrike isn't important to focus on - it
> will take care of itself.
>
> http://www.dragondoor.com/cgi-bin/tpost.pl?smessage=128214
>
> for a post of mine on this subject in which I go into more detail.
>
> -S-
> http://www.kbnj.com
>
> > Bob

Donovan Rebbechi
November 5th 03, 11:11 PM
In article >, Steve Freides wrote:
> Beach, wrote:
>>
>> Steve Freides wrote:
>>

> No change like that should be done overnight. I switched very
> gradually, starting with one shorter run per week done in racing flats
> and at a higher speed and gradually building up from there. The way to
> change your gait is to think about landing with your foot underneath
> your center of gravity instead of in front of it. Yessis actually
> discusses the fact that everyone won't land on their forefoot due to leg
> length and other variables. The point of his book is to land in such a
> manner that you're not braking then restarting with each step, which is

I think a simpler way still to deal with this is simply make sure that your
cadence is up there around 180 strides per minute. Whenever I see someone
running with a braking action, they are invariably bounding / overstriding
with a cadence of only 160 strides per minute or even less.

> what landing heel first will do.

The heel/forefoot dichotomy is a little misleading. What people normally tend
to do is touch outer heel, then roll towards the inside and the toe (pronation)
which cushions the shock like someone rolling to absorb a fall. Even when the
heel touches down first, nearly all the shock should be absorbed by the ball.
The heel doesn't actually "strike" unless there is serious overstriding going
on.

So I agree that the footstrike isn't the right thing to focus on, but I think
the problem is greatly simplified by looking at stride rate. I have yet to
see someone running with a braing action at 180/min.

Cheers,
--
Donovan Rebbechi
http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/