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Steve Freides
November 18th 03, 06:48 PM
Got the rack Sunday night, did a few singles up to 165 lbs., today 4 singles
at 185. My bodyweight is 148 lbs. so this is exactly 1.25 x bodyweight.
Comments, good or bad, invited. Here you go, video of my first squat
workout - this is my 4th/last rep of the day.

http://www.kbnj.com/squat185.rm

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com

ff123
November 18th 03, 07:31 PM
On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 13:48:19 -0500, "Steve Freides"
> wrote:

>Got the rack Sunday night, did a few singles up to 165 lbs., today 4 singles
>at 185. My bodyweight is 148 lbs. so this is exactly 1.25 x bodyweight.
>Comments, good or bad, invited. Here you go, video of my first squat
>workout - this is my 4th/last rep of the day.
>
>http://www.kbnj.com/squat185.rm
>
>-S-
>http://www.kbnj.com

Makes me hanker to start barbell squatting and deadlifting myself (I'm
pretty much tied to working out in my house (can't even go out to the
garage!), and I don't have space for a rack or power rack), and maybe
not even a standard barbell. I'm thinking about getting a shrug bar,
though.

Several comments: 1) you squat in socks? 2) it looks to me like you
go lower than parallel. 3) looks like your back stays in good
position to me.

ff123

Will
November 18th 03, 07:49 PM
In article >,
"Steve Freides" > wrote:

> Got the rack Sunday night, did a few singles up to 165 lbs., today 4 singles
> at 185. My bodyweight is 148 lbs. so this is exactly 1.25 x bodyweight.
> Comments, good or bad, invited. Here you go, video of my first squat
> workout - this is my 4th/last rep of the day.
>
> http://www.kbnj.com/squat185.rm
>
> -S-
> http://www.kbnj.com


Looks good. However, since you are doing this with the intention of
competing (right?):

You don't need to go quite so deep. Review the rules for your chosen
fed.

You're going to have to wear shoes in the meet so I'd start getting used
to that ASAP. It will feel different, especially if you pick shoes with
any kind of raised heel.

Since you do a lot of deadlifting I'm guessing your hams and glutes are
strong relative to your quads. So you might benefit from a wider stance
and sitting back more.

Will
November 18th 03, 07:52 PM
In article >,
Will > wrote:

> In article >,
> "Steve Freides" > wrote:
>
> > Got the rack Sunday night, did a few singles up to 165 lbs., today 4 singles
> > at 185. My bodyweight is 148 lbs. so this is exactly 1.25 x bodyweight.
> > Comments, good or bad, invited. Here you go, video of my first squat
> > workout - this is my 4th/last rep of the day.
> >
> > http://www.kbnj.com/squat185.rm
> >
> > -S-
> > http://www.kbnj.com
>
>
> Looks good. However, since you are doing this with the intention of
> competing (right?):
>
> You don't need to go quite so deep. Review the rules for your chosen
> fed.
>
> You're going to have to wear shoes in the meet so I'd start getting used
> to that ASAP. It will feel different, especially if you pick shoes with
> any kind of raised heel.
>
> Since you do a lot of deadlifting I'm guessing your hams and glutes are
> strong relative to your quads. So you might benefit from a wider stance
> and sitting back more.

Also, for competitions...you can't move your feet at all between the
start and rack commands. They might catch that toe curl you did, and
you definitetly want to work on standing up and steadying yourself
before stepping back into the rack.

John Hanson
November 19th 03, 05:10 AM
On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 13:48:19 -0500, "Steve Freides"
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

>Got the rack Sunday night, did a few singles up to 165 lbs., today 4 singles
>at 185. My bodyweight is 148 lbs. so this is exactly 1.25 x bodyweight.
>Comments, good or bad, invited. Here you go, video of my first squat
>workout - this is my 4th/last rep of the day.
>
>http://www.kbnj.com/squat185.rm
>
>-S-
>http://www.kbnj.com
>

3 red lights are in your future if you keep squatting like that. Your
knees aren't locked out before you start and then you kind of double
dip at the top while you are descending which will also get you
redlighted. You don't need to go that deep btw.

John Hanson
November 19th 03, 05:16 AM
On Wed, 19 Nov 2003 05:10:19 GMT, John Hanson
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

>On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 13:48:19 -0500, "Steve Freides"
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:
>
>>Got the rack Sunday night, did a few singles up to 165 lbs., today 4 singles
>>at 185. My bodyweight is 148 lbs. so this is exactly 1.25 x bodyweight.
>>Comments, good or bad, invited. Here you go, video of my first squat
>>workout - this is my 4th/last rep of the day.
>>
>>http://www.kbnj.com/squat185.rm
>>
>>-S-
>>http://www.kbnj.com
>>
>
>3 red lights are in your future if you keep squatting like that. Your
>knees aren't locked out before you start and then you kind of double
>dip at the top while you are descending which will also get you
>redlighted. You don't need to go that deep btw.

And after you lock it out, hold it for a second. You'll have to hold
it until the head ref tells you to "rack" in competition.

Top Sirloin
November 19th 03, 06:37 PM
On Wed, 19 Nov 2003 13:56:36 -0500, "Steve Freides" >
wrote:

>Today I put some more weight on the bar (went up to about 1.75x bodyweight)
>and just practiced unracking it and standing still with it, knees locked.
>It's a good exercise for me and I'm guessing I'll do something like
>alternating this unrack/stand/rack drill with actual squatting for a while
>just to help get used to the weight on my back.

My favorite "emergency" routine for quickly increasing my squat poundage is 3x3
4 times a week (Sat,Sun+Tues,Wed) moving the poundage in a wave pattern, i.e.
345,335,325,335 - next week 355,345,335,345 .

Throw in some speed box squats afterwards if you're still feeling peppy.

Every four weeks or so unload and just do two speed workouts.


--
Scott Johnson
"Always with the excuses for small legs. People like you are
why they only open the top half of caskets." -Tommy Bowen

Steve Freides
November 19th 03, 06:56 PM
"Will" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> Will > wrote:
>
> > In article >,
> > "Steve Freides" > wrote:
> >
> > > Got the rack Sunday night, did a few singles up to 165 lbs., today 4
singles
> > > at 185. My bodyweight is 148 lbs. so this is exactly 1.25 x
bodyweight.
> > > Comments, good or bad, invited. Here you go, video of my first squat
> > > workout - this is my 4th/last rep of the day.
> > >
> > > http://www.kbnj.com/squat185.rm
> > >
> > > -S-
> > > http://www.kbnj.com
> >
> >
> > Looks good. However, since you are doing this with the intention of
> > competing (right?):
> >
> > You don't need to go quite so deep. Review the rules for your chosen
> > fed.
> >
> > You're going to have to wear shoes in the meet so I'd start getting used
> > to that ASAP. It will feel different, especially if you pick shoes with
> > any kind of raised heel.
> >
> > Since you do a lot of deadlifting I'm guessing your hams and glutes are
> > strong relative to your quads. So you might benefit from a wider stance
> > and sitting back more.
>
> Also, for competitions...you can't move your feet at all between the
> start and rack commands. They might catch that toe curl you did, and
> you definitetly want to work on standing up and steadying yourself
> before stepping back into the rack.

Today I put some more weight on the bar (went up to about 1.75x bodyweight)
and just practiced unracking it and standing still with it, knees locked.
It's a good exercise for me and I'm guessing I'll do something like
alternating this unrack/stand/rack drill with actual squatting for a while
just to help get used to the weight on my back.

-S-

John Hanson
November 19th 03, 07:10 PM
On Wed, 19 Nov 2003 13:56:36 -0500, "Steve Freides"
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

>"Will" > wrote in message
...
>> In article >,
>> Will > wrote:
>>
>> > In article >,
>> > "Steve Freides" > wrote:
>> >
>> > > Got the rack Sunday night, did a few singles up to 165 lbs., today 4
>singles
>> > > at 185. My bodyweight is 148 lbs. so this is exactly 1.25 x
>bodyweight.
>> > > Comments, good or bad, invited. Here you go, video of my first squat
>> > > workout - this is my 4th/last rep of the day.
>> > >
>> > > http://www.kbnj.com/squat185.rm
>> > >
>> > > -S-
>> > > http://www.kbnj.com
>> >
>> >
>> > Looks good. However, since you are doing this with the intention of
>> > competing (right?):
>> >
>> > You don't need to go quite so deep. Review the rules for your chosen
>> > fed.
>> >
>> > You're going to have to wear shoes in the meet so I'd start getting used
>> > to that ASAP. It will feel different, especially if you pick shoes with
>> > any kind of raised heel.
>> >
>> > Since you do a lot of deadlifting I'm guessing your hams and glutes are
>> > strong relative to your quads. So you might benefit from a wider stance
>> > and sitting back more.
>>
>> Also, for competitions...you can't move your feet at all between the
>> start and rack commands. They might catch that toe curl you did, and
>> you definitetly want to work on standing up and steadying yourself
>> before stepping back into the rack.
>
>Today I put some more weight on the bar (went up to about 1.75x bodyweight)
>and just practiced unracking it and standing still with it, knees locked.
>It's a good exercise for me and I'm guessing I'll do something like
>alternating this unrack/stand/rack drill with actual squatting for a while
>just to help get used to the weight on my back.
>
>-S-
>
Good idea. I would be a good idea to read the rule book of the fed
you plan on lifting in too. USPF and USAPL are pretty strict about
following the rules to the letter. It really nice for me to be able
to train with 2 people that are judges as they point out these
violations.

Hoff
November 19th 03, 07:59 PM
"Steve Freides" > wrote in message
...
> "Will" > wrote in message
> ...
> > In article >,
> > Will > wrote:
> >
> > > In article >,
> > > "Steve Freides" > wrote:
> > >
> > > > Got the rack Sunday night, did a few singles up to 165 lbs., today 4
> singles
> > > > at 185. My bodyweight is 148 lbs. so this is exactly 1.25 x
> bodyweight.
> > > > Comments, good or bad, invited. Here you go, video of my first
squat
> > > > workout - this is my 4th/last rep of the day.
> > > >
> > > > http://www.kbnj.com/squat185.rm
> > > >
> > > > -S-
> > > > http://www.kbnj.com
> > >
> > >
> > > Looks good. However, since you are doing this with the intention of
> > > competing (right?):
> > >
> > > You don't need to go quite so deep. Review the rules for your chosen
> > > fed.
> > >
> > > You're going to have to wear shoes in the meet so I'd start getting
used
> > > to that ASAP. It will feel different, especially if you pick shoes
with
> > > any kind of raised heel.
> > >
> > > Since you do a lot of deadlifting I'm guessing your hams and glutes
are
> > > strong relative to your quads. So you might benefit from a wider
stance
> > > and sitting back more.
> >
> > Also, for competitions...you can't move your feet at all between the
> > start and rack commands. They might catch that toe curl you did, and
> > you definitetly want to work on standing up and steadying yourself
> > before stepping back into the rack.
>
> Today I put some more weight on the bar (went up to about 1.75x
bodyweight)
> and just practiced unracking it and standing still with it, knees locked.
> It's a good exercise for me and I'm guessing I'll do something like
> alternating this unrack/stand/rack drill with actual squatting for a while
> just to help get used to the weight on my back.
>

Personally, I'd just do a couple of these after squats.

I'll throw my .02 in with everyone else's advice. I'd work on your walkout.
You spent a lot of time shifting feet, walking it back, etc, after
unracking. All of that uses up potential energy that you could save for the
lift. RDC has a really good article on all three lifts here:

http://www.weighttrainersunited.com/advanced.html

But read the walkout portion especially. Try to get it down to 2-3 steps at
most.

Hoff

Steve Freides
November 19th 03, 11:15 PM
"Hoff" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s52...
> "Steve Freides" > wrote in message
> ...
> > "Will" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > > In article >,
> > > Will > wrote:
> > >
> > > > In article >,
> > > > "Steve Freides" > wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > Got the rack Sunday night, did a few singles up to 165 lbs., today
4
> > singles
> > > > > at 185. My bodyweight is 148 lbs. so this is exactly 1.25 x
> > bodyweight.
> > > > > Comments, good or bad, invited. Here you go, video of my first
> squat
> > > > > workout - this is my 4th/last rep of the day.
> > > > >
> > > > > http://www.kbnj.com/squat185.rm
> > > > >
> > > > > -S-
> > > > > http://www.kbnj.com
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > Looks good. However, since you are doing this with the intention of
> > > > competing (right?):
> > > >
> > > > You don't need to go quite so deep. Review the rules for your
chosen
> > > > fed.
> > > >
> > > > You're going to have to wear shoes in the meet so I'd start getting
> used
> > > > to that ASAP. It will feel different, especially if you pick shoes
> with
> > > > any kind of raised heel.
> > > >
> > > > Since you do a lot of deadlifting I'm guessing your hams and glutes
> are
> > > > strong relative to your quads. So you might benefit from a wider
> stance
> > > > and sitting back more.
> > >
> > > Also, for competitions...you can't move your feet at all between the
> > > start and rack commands. They might catch that toe curl you did, and
> > > you definitetly want to work on standing up and steadying yourself
> > > before stepping back into the rack.
> >
> > Today I put some more weight on the bar (went up to about 1.75x
> bodyweight)
> > and just practiced unracking it and standing still with it, knees
locked.
> > It's a good exercise for me and I'm guessing I'll do something like
> > alternating this unrack/stand/rack drill with actual squatting for a
while
> > just to help get used to the weight on my back.
> >
>
> Personally, I'd just do a couple of these after squats.
>
> I'll throw my .02 in with everyone else's advice. I'd work on your
walkout.
> You spent a lot of time shifting feet, walking it back, etc, after
> unracking. All of that uses up potential energy that you could save for
the
> lift. RDC has a really good article on all three lifts here:
>
> http://www.weighttrainersunited.com/advanced.html
>
> But read the walkout portion especially. Try to get it down to 2-3 steps
at
> most.
>
> Hoff

Good article - I'd seen it once before but had forgotten about it.

When I deadlift, I fiddle and futz to get my back lined up right before
bending down for the bar - once I take a breath and head down it's all
business but I've gotten used to prepping my back; after all, with my
history, I need to be careful.

I am not going to forget all this stuff about how to walk out a squat but
neither can I rush things. I've had a squat rack in my house for 72 hours;
I'm going to take it slow and easy and see how things go. I'm hoping that a
lot of the nonsense I did in the video before the actual squat will fall
away with practice and the passage of time. I would like to practice
perfect form every time but I also need to get a feeling for having a heavy
weight on my shoulders and I can't get that in perfect form so I'm kind of
wading in slowly and will probably do some days with a very light weight and
go for proper form and other days where just standing up with the thing is
the focus.

I'll try to post another short video when I feel I've made some progress.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com

John Hanson
November 19th 03, 11:28 PM
On Wed, 19 Nov 2003 13:37:24 -0500, Top Sirloin
> wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

>On Wed, 19 Nov 2003 13:56:36 -0500, "Steve Freides" >
>wrote:
>
>>Today I put some more weight on the bar (went up to about 1.75x bodyweight)
>>and just practiced unracking it and standing still with it, knees locked.
>>It's a good exercise for me and I'm guessing I'll do something like
>>alternating this unrack/stand/rack drill with actual squatting for a while
>>just to help get used to the weight on my back.
>
>My favorite "emergency" routine for quickly increasing my squat poundage is 3x3
>4 times a week (Sat,Sun+Tues,Wed) moving the poundage in a wave pattern, i.e.
>345,335,325,335 - next week 355,345,335,345 .

What percentages are those? I was reading an article in Pure Power
about just approaching the overtraining point and backing off. I'm
leaving for Florida in 3 weeks and was thinking about doing something
like that for the next 3 weeks and then relaxing on the beach for a
week.


>
>Throw in some speed box squats afterwards if you're still feeling peppy.
>
>Every four weeks or so unload and just do two speed workouts.

Wayne S. Hill
November 20th 03, 12:20 AM
John Hanson wrote:

> What percentages are those? I was reading an article in
> Pure Power about just approaching the overtraining point and
> backing off. I'm leaving for Florida in 3 weeks and was
> thinking about doing something like that for the next 3
> weeks and then relaxing on the beach for a week.

I haven't seen the article (dropped my subscription when it had a
picture of a guy doing pushups on a wobble board: that was enough
for me), but it sounds familiar. Anyway, I'd suggest doing what
won't kill you, i.e., work really hard. With each set, say to
yourself, "Can I do another set? After this, the vacation will
feel really good." Use a form break, or certainty of failure on
the next rep, as a sign to end a set.

BTW, I would only recommend this to someone who's been lifting for
a while and has a brain: someone who's inexperienced or stupid
could really hurt themself doing this.

--
-Wayne

Top Sirloin
November 20th 03, 01:23 AM
On 20 Nov 2003 00:20:15 GMT, "Wayne S. Hill" > wrote:

>John Hanson wrote:
>
>> What percentages are those? I was reading an article in
>> Pure Power about just approaching the overtraining point and
>> backing off. I'm leaving for Florida in 3 weeks and was
>> thinking about doing something like that for the next 3
>> weeks and then relaxing on the beach for a week.
>
>I haven't seen the article (dropped my subscription when it had a
>picture of a guy doing pushups on a wobble board: that was enough
>for me), but it sounds familiar. Anyway, I'd suggest doing what
>won't kill you, i.e., work really hard. With each set, say to
>yourself, "Can I do another set? After this, the vacation will
>feel really good."

:-)

>Use a form break, or certainty of failure on
>the next rep, as a sign to end a set.

Word.

>BTW, I would only recommend this to someone who's been lifting for
>a while and has a brain: someone who's inexperienced or stupid
>could really hurt themself doing this.

I didn't get John's original post, but I go until I miss a set two or three
workouts in a row. You can't go by just one workout because it could just be a
crappy workout, the moons effect on gravity or that tuna you had for lunch. :-)

I never start it with a certain percentage, rather my 5 or 6RM.

I once did it with my bench, squat and deads along with speed bench AND speed
box squats (+ curls!) 4x a week for 6 weeks. That was the routine where I made
the comment that I didn't get overtrained, just stronger. The key was to avoid
neural burnout by knowing when that last rep is going to be a 20 second killer
in bad form.


--

Scott Johnson
"be a man ,stop looking for handouts , eat ,lift and shut your mouth"
-John Carlo

John Hanson
November 20th 03, 01:30 AM
On 20 Nov 2003 00:20:15 GMT, "Wayne S. Hill" > wrote
in misc.fitness.weights:

>John Hanson wrote:
>
>> What percentages are those? I was reading an article in
>> Pure Power about just approaching the overtraining point and
>> backing off. I'm leaving for Florida in 3 weeks and was
>> thinking about doing something like that for the next 3
>> weeks and then relaxing on the beach for a week.
>
>I haven't seen the article (dropped my subscription when it had a
>picture of a guy doing pushups on a wobble board: that was enough
>for me), but it sounds familiar. Anyway, I'd suggest doing what
>won't kill you, i.e., work really hard. With each set, say to
>yourself, "Can I do another set? After this, the vacation will
>feel really good." Use a form break, or certainty of failure on
>the next rep, as a sign to end a set.
>
>BTW, I would only recommend this to someone who's been lifting for
>a while and has a brain: someone who's inexperienced or stupid
>could really hurt themself doing this.

Let's hope I don't kill myself. Thanks.

Jeff Finlayson
November 20th 03, 04:09 AM
Hoff wrote:
> "Steve Freides" > wrote
>>"Will" > wrote

>>>Also, for competitions...you can't move your feet at all between the
>>>start and rack commands. They might catch that toe curl you did, and
>>>you definitetly want to work on standing up and steadying yourself
>>>before stepping back into the rack.
>>
>>Today I put some more weight on the bar (went up to about 1.75x
>>bodyweight) and just practiced unracking it and standing still
>>with it, knees locked. It's a good exercise for me and I'm guessing
>>I'll do something like alternating this unrack/stand/rack drill
>>with actual squatting for a while just to help get used to the
>>weight on my back.
>
> Personally, I'd just do a couple of these after squats.
>
> I'll throw my .02 in with everyone else's advice. I'd work on your walkout.
> You spent a lot of time shifting feet, walking it back, etc, after unracking.
> All of that uses up potential energy that you could save for the lift.
> RDC has a really good article on all three lifts here:
>
> http://www.weighttrainersunited.com/advanced.html
>
> But read the walkout portion especially. Try to get it down to 2-3 steps at
> most.
>
> Hoff

This article by Deepsquatter goes into to more detail on the 3 step walk out.
http://www.powermagonline.com/archives/got-squat.htm

Hoff
November 20th 03, 11:47 AM
"Steve Freides" > wrote in message
...
> "Hoff" > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]_s52...
> > "Steve Freides" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > > "Will" > wrote in message
> > > ...
> > > > In article >,
> > > > Will > wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > In article >,
> > > > > "Steve Freides" > wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > > > Got the rack Sunday night, did a few singles up to 165 lbs.,
today
> 4
> > > singles
> > > > > > at 185. My bodyweight is 148 lbs. so this is exactly 1.25 x
> > > bodyweight.
> > > > > > Comments, good or bad, invited. Here you go, video of my first
> > squat
> > > > > > workout - this is my 4th/last rep of the day.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > http://www.kbnj.com/squat185.rm
> > > > > >
> > > > > > -S-
> > > > > > http://www.kbnj.com
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > > Looks good. However, since you are doing this with the intention
of
> > > > > competing (right?):
> > > > >
> > > > > You don't need to go quite so deep. Review the rules for your
> chosen
> > > > > fed.
> > > > >
> > > > > You're going to have to wear shoes in the meet so I'd start
getting
> > used
> > > > > to that ASAP. It will feel different, especially if you pick
shoes
> > with
> > > > > any kind of raised heel.
> > > > >
> > > > > Since you do a lot of deadlifting I'm guessing your hams and
glutes
> > are
> > > > > strong relative to your quads. So you might benefit from a wider
> > stance
> > > > > and sitting back more.
> > > >
> > > > Also, for competitions...you can't move your feet at all between the
> > > > start and rack commands. They might catch that toe curl you did,
and
> > > > you definitetly want to work on standing up and steadying yourself
> > > > before stepping back into the rack.
> > >
> > > Today I put some more weight on the bar (went up to about 1.75x
> > bodyweight)
> > > and just practiced unracking it and standing still with it, knees
> locked.
> > > It's a good exercise for me and I'm guessing I'll do something like
> > > alternating this unrack/stand/rack drill with actual squatting for a
> while
> > > just to help get used to the weight on my back.
> > >
> >
> > Personally, I'd just do a couple of these after squats.
> >
> > I'll throw my .02 in with everyone else's advice. I'd work on your
> walkout.
> > You spent a lot of time shifting feet, walking it back, etc, after
> > unracking. All of that uses up potential energy that you could save for
> the
> > lift. RDC has a really good article on all three lifts here:
> >
> > http://www.weighttrainersunited.com/advanced.html
> >
> > But read the walkout portion especially. Try to get it down to 2-3
steps
> at
> > most.
> >
> > Hoff
>
> Good article - I'd seen it once before but had forgotten about it.
>
> When I deadlift, I fiddle and futz to get my back lined up right before
> bending down for the bar - once I take a breath and head down it's all
> business but I've gotten used to prepping my back; after all, with my
> history, I need to be careful.

Yes, but you aren't fiddling and futzing while the weight is on your back in
the deadlift.

>
> I am not going to forget all this stuff about how to walk out a squat but
> neither can I rush things. I've had a squat rack in my house for 72
hours;
> I'm going to take it slow and easy and see how things go. I'm hoping that
a
> lot of the nonsense I did in the video before the actual squat will fall
> away with practice and the passage of time. I would like to practice
> perfect form every time but I also need to get a feeling for having a
heavy
> weight on my shoulders and I can't get that in perfect form so I'm kind of
> wading in slowly and will probably do some days with a very light weight
and
> go for proper form and other days where just standing up with the thing is
> the focus.

You're worried about your back, yet you're willing to risk screwing around
with relatively heavy weights before you get your form down?

Hoff

Peter Webb
November 20th 03, 12:25 PM
Just to clarify. These are the "first squats" you have done?
This is 1.5 times my "last squat" !


"Steve Freides" > wrote in message
...
> Got the rack Sunday night, did a few singles up to 165 lbs., today 4
singles
> at 185. My bodyweight is 148 lbs. so this is exactly 1.25 x bodyweight.
> Comments, good or bad, invited. Here you go, video of my first squat
> workout - this is my 4th/last rep of the day.
>
> http://www.kbnj.com/squat185.rm
>
> -S-
> http://www.kbnj.com
>
>

Steve Freides
November 20th 03, 03:18 PM
"Peter Webb" > wrote in message
u...
> Just to clarify. These are the "first squats" you have done?
> This is 1.5 times my "last squat" !

Yes. Here is my entire history of squatting:

1. 10 or 20 years ago, I bought a cheapy set of weights and used to do
light quarter-squats when I was running every day. We're talking
quarter-squats with, oh, 50 lbs. - that doesn't count.

2. About 3 or 4 years ago, I squatted a few times at the YMCA but, since I
had no spotter and there was no squat rack, just one of those "gun rack"
walk-out arrangements, I never went much over my bodyweight. I was
squatting after have run and swam, and deadlifted, my legs were tired, and I
probably did it for a few weeks before stopping.

3. This is my first serious squatting and I intend to get up to at least
250 lbs. by the Spring if I can, somewhere in the range 2x bodyweight. I
figure I'll be content to take a 350 or better deadlift and a 250-300 squat
to my first powerlifting meet sometime next year.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com

> "Steve Freides" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Got the rack Sunday night, did a few singles up to 165 lbs., today 4
> singles
> > at 185. My bodyweight is 148 lbs. so this is exactly 1.25 x bodyweight.
> > Comments, good or bad, invited. Here you go, video of my first squat
> > workout - this is my 4th/last rep of the day.
> >
> > http://www.kbnj.com/squat185.rm
> >
> > -S-
> > http://www.kbnj.com
> >
> >
>
>

Steve Freides
November 20th 03, 03:57 PM
"Hoff" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s52...
> "Steve Freides" > wrote in message
> ...
> > "Hoff" > wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]_s52...
> > > "Steve Freides" > wrote in message
> > > ...
> > > > "Will" > wrote in message
> > > > ...
> > > > > In article >,
> > > > > Will > wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > > > In article >,
> > > > > > "Steve Freides" > wrote:
> > > > > >
> > > > > > > Got the rack Sunday night, did a few singles up to 165 lbs.,
> today
> > 4
> > > > singles
> > > > > > > at 185. My bodyweight is 148 lbs. so this is exactly 1.25 x
> > > > bodyweight.
> > > > > > > Comments, good or bad, invited. Here you go, video of my
first
> > > squat
> > > > > > > workout - this is my 4th/last rep of the day.
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > http://www.kbnj.com/squat185.rm
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > -S-
> > > > > > > http://www.kbnj.com
> > > > > >
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Looks good. However, since you are doing this with the
intention
> of
> > > > > > competing (right?):
> > > > > >
> > > > > > You don't need to go quite so deep. Review the rules for your
> > chosen
> > > > > > fed.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > You're going to have to wear shoes in the meet so I'd start
> getting
> > > used
> > > > > > to that ASAP. It will feel different, especially if you pick
> shoes
> > > with
> > > > > > any kind of raised heel.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Since you do a lot of deadlifting I'm guessing your hams and
> glutes
> > > are
> > > > > > strong relative to your quads. So you might benefit from a
wider
> > > stance
> > > > > > and sitting back more.
> > > > >
> > > > > Also, for competitions...you can't move your feet at all between
the
> > > > > start and rack commands. They might catch that toe curl you did,
> and
> > > > > you definitetly want to work on standing up and steadying yourself
> > > > > before stepping back into the rack.
> > > >
> > > > Today I put some more weight on the bar (went up to about 1.75x
> > > bodyweight)
> > > > and just practiced unracking it and standing still with it, knees
> > locked.
> > > > It's a good exercise for me and I'm guessing I'll do something like
> > > > alternating this unrack/stand/rack drill with actual squatting for a
> > while
> > > > just to help get used to the weight on my back.
> > > >
> > >
> > > Personally, I'd just do a couple of these after squats.
> > >
> > > I'll throw my .02 in with everyone else's advice. I'd work on your
> > walkout.
> > > You spent a lot of time shifting feet, walking it back, etc, after
> > > unracking. All of that uses up potential energy that you could save
for
> > the
> > > lift. RDC has a really good article on all three lifts here:
> > >
> > > http://www.weighttrainersunited.com/advanced.html
> > >
> > > But read the walkout portion especially. Try to get it down to 2-3
> steps
> > at
> > > most.
> > >
> > > Hoff
> >
> > Good article - I'd seen it once before but had forgotten about it.
> >
> > When I deadlift, I fiddle and futz to get my back lined up right before
> > bending down for the bar - once I take a breath and head down it's all
> > business but I've gotten used to prepping my back; after all, with my
> > history, I need to be careful.
>
> Yes, but you aren't fiddling and futzing while the weight is on your back
in
> the deadlift.
>
> >
> > I am not going to forget all this stuff about how to walk out a squat
but
> > neither can I rush things. I've had a squat rack in my house for 72
> hours;
> > I'm going to take it slow and easy and see how things go. I'm hoping
that
> a
> > lot of the nonsense I did in the video before the actual squat will fall
> > away with practice and the passage of time. I would like to practice
> > perfect form every time but I also need to get a feeling for having a
> heavy
> > weight on my shoulders and I can't get that in perfect form so I'm kind
of
> > wading in slowly and will probably do some days with a very light weight
> and
> > go for proper form and other days where just standing up with the thing
is
> > the focus.
>
> You're worried about your back, yet you're willing to risk screwing around
> with relatively heavy weights before you get your form down?

I have found that lifting a weight that is not sufficiently heavy removes
certain requirements of form; therefore, even though it engenders an
increased risk of a minor injury at this early stage of the my learning a
new movement, I choose to take the risk and, at least some of the time, go
heavy.

The classic example for me in my kettlebell teaching is the rack position of
the clean. Almost everyone I teach cleans a kettlebell the first time to
what might be called the starting position for a shoulder press, that is,
with their arm relatively disconnected from their body, kind of a 'holding
an umbrella for the person next to you" position. That position is fine for
holding an umbrella but it's not fine for stopping a heavy cast iron weight
flying through the air, so after they're gotten their feet wet with the
movement using a light weight, I hand them a heavier weight and don't ask
them to clean it, just to hold it in the racked position, and their form
immediately changes - they bring the weight in closer to their bodies and
lots of other good things happen as well. All the explaining in the world
doesn't teach the proper form of the clean to most people; a heavier weight
does.

Being that I'm largely my own teacher in this, I'm going to trust my
judgement and follow my usual guideline, which is to lift the heaviest
weight I can lift and train as often as possible while remaining as fresh as
possible, namely a few heavy singles done at least 3x/week and probably more
as I get used to the squatting.

Put another way, I don't "screw around" when I lift weights, heavy or not.
I pay very close and careful attention, I ask a lot of questions, I try to
learn something every time I practice, and I stop well before fatigue or
unfamiliarity with the movement would get me into trouble. In my opinion, a
lot of folks would do better to lift heavier more often because, after a
while, you have no choice but to practice good technique - it's either that
or get hurt and no one wants to get hurt.

A learning style for the faint of heart? Certainly not, but it's what works
for me and it's what I encourage in my students now as well.

Steve "waiting for the chorus of 'Boy, am I glad I don't take your class!'"
Freides

http://www.kbnj.com

> Hoff
>
>

Hoff
November 20th 03, 06:18 PM
"Steve Freides" > wrote in message
...
<snip>
> > > > I'll throw my .02 in with everyone else's advice. I'd work on your
> > > walkout.
> > > > You spent a lot of time shifting feet, walking it back, etc, after
> > > > unracking. All of that uses up potential energy that you could save
> for
> > > the
> > > > lift. RDC has a really good article on all three lifts here:
> > > >
> > > > http://www.weighttrainersunited.com/advanced.html
> > > >
> > > > But read the walkout portion especially. Try to get it down to 2-3
> > steps
> > > at
> > > > most.
> > > >
> > > > Hoff
> > >
> > > Good article - I'd seen it once before but had forgotten about it.
> > >
> > > When I deadlift, I fiddle and futz to get my back lined up right
before
> > > bending down for the bar - once I take a breath and head down it's all
> > > business but I've gotten used to prepping my back; after all, with my
> > > history, I need to be careful.
> >
> > Yes, but you aren't fiddling and futzing while the weight is on your
back
> in
> > the deadlift.
> >
> > >
> > > I am not going to forget all this stuff about how to walk out a squat
> but
> > > neither can I rush things. I've had a squat rack in my house for 72
> > hours;
> > > I'm going to take it slow and easy and see how things go. I'm hoping
> that
> > a
> > > lot of the nonsense I did in the video before the actual squat will
fall
> > > away with practice and the passage of time. I would like to practice
> > > perfect form every time but I also need to get a feeling for having a
> > heavy
> > > weight on my shoulders and I can't get that in perfect form so I'm
kind
> of
> > > wading in slowly and will probably do some days with a very light
weight
> > and
> > > go for proper form and other days where just standing up with the
thing
> is
> > > the focus.
> >
> > You're worried about your back, yet you're willing to risk screwing
around
> > with relatively heavy weights before you get your form down?
>
> I have found that lifting a weight that is not sufficiently heavy removes
> certain requirements of form; therefore, even though it engenders an
> increased risk of a minor injury at this early stage of the my learning a
> new movement, I choose to take the risk and, at least some of the time, go
> heavy.
>
> The classic example for me in my kettlebell teaching is the rack position
of
> the clean. Almost everyone I teach cleans a kettlebell the first time to
> what might be called the starting position for a shoulder press, that is,
> with their arm relatively disconnected from their body, kind of a 'holding
> an umbrella for the person next to you" position. That position is fine
for
> holding an umbrella but it's not fine for stopping a heavy cast iron
weight
> flying through the air, so after they're gotten their feet wet with the
> movement using a light weight, I hand them a heavier weight and don't ask
> them to clean it, just to hold it in the racked position, and their form
> immediately changes - they bring the weight in closer to their bodies and
> lots of other good things happen as well. All the explaining in the world
> doesn't teach the proper form of the clean to most people; a heavier
weight
> does.
>
> Being that I'm largely my own teacher in this, I'm going to trust my
> judgement and follow my usual guideline, which is to lift the heaviest
> weight I can lift and train as often as possible while remaining as fresh
as
> possible, namely a few heavy singles done at least 3x/week and probably
more
> as I get used to the squatting.
>
> Put another way, I don't "screw around" when I lift weights, heavy or not.
> I pay very close and careful attention, I ask a lot of questions, I try to
> learn something every time I practice, and I stop well before fatigue or
> unfamiliarity with the movement would get me into trouble. In my opinion,
a
> lot of folks would do better to lift heavier more often because, after a
> while, you have no choice but to practice good technique - it's either
that
> or get hurt and no one wants to get hurt.
>
> A learning style for the faint of heart? Certainly not, but it's what
works
> for me and it's what I encourage in my students now as well.

Ah. Well then, good luck.

Hoff

Steve Freides
November 21st 03, 03:11 AM
"Hoff" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s51...
> "Steve Freides" > wrote in message
> ...
> <snip>
> > > > > I'll throw my .02 in with everyone else's advice. I'd work on
your
> > > > walkout.
> > > > > You spent a lot of time shifting feet, walking it back, etc, after
> > > > > unracking. All of that uses up potential energy that you could
save
> > for
> > > > the
> > > > > lift. RDC has a really good article on all three lifts here:
> > > > >
> > > > > http://www.weighttrainersunited.com/advanced.html
> > > > >
> > > > > But read the walkout portion especially. Try to get it down to
2-3
> > > steps
> > > > at
> > > > > most.
> > > > >
> > > > > Hoff
> > > >
> > > > Good article - I'd seen it once before but had forgotten about it.
> > > >
> > > > When I deadlift, I fiddle and futz to get my back lined up right
> before
> > > > bending down for the bar - once I take a breath and head down it's
all
> > > > business but I've gotten used to prepping my back; after all, with
my
> > > > history, I need to be careful.
> > >
> > > Yes, but you aren't fiddling and futzing while the weight is on your
> back
> > in
> > > the deadlift.
> > >
> > > >
> > > > I am not going to forget all this stuff about how to walk out a
squat
> > but
> > > > neither can I rush things. I've had a squat rack in my house for 72
> > > hours;
> > > > I'm going to take it slow and easy and see how things go. I'm
hoping
> > that
> > > a
> > > > lot of the nonsense I did in the video before the actual squat will
> fall
> > > > away with practice and the passage of time. I would like to
practice
> > > > perfect form every time but I also need to get a feeling for having
a
> > > heavy
> > > > weight on my shoulders and I can't get that in perfect form so I'm
> kind
> > of
> > > > wading in slowly and will probably do some days with a very light
> weight
> > > and
> > > > go for proper form and other days where just standing up with the
> thing
> > is
> > > > the focus.
> > >
> > > You're worried about your back, yet you're willing to risk screwing
> around
> > > with relatively heavy weights before you get your form down?
> >
> > I have found that lifting a weight that is not sufficiently heavy
removes
> > certain requirements of form; therefore, even though it engenders an
> > increased risk of a minor injury at this early stage of the my learning
a
> > new movement, I choose to take the risk and, at least some of the time,
go
> > heavy.
> >
> > The classic example for me in my kettlebell teaching is the rack
position
> of
> > the clean. Almost everyone I teach cleans a kettlebell the first time
to
> > what might be called the starting position for a shoulder press, that
is,
> > with their arm relatively disconnected from their body, kind of a
'holding
> > an umbrella for the person next to you" position. That position is fine
> for
> > holding an umbrella but it's not fine for stopping a heavy cast iron
> weight
> > flying through the air, so after they're gotten their feet wet with the
> > movement using a light weight, I hand them a heavier weight and don't
ask
> > them to clean it, just to hold it in the racked position, and their form
> > immediately changes - they bring the weight in closer to their bodies
and
> > lots of other good things happen as well. All the explaining in the
world
> > doesn't teach the proper form of the clean to most people; a heavier
> weight
> > does.
> >
> > Being that I'm largely my own teacher in this, I'm going to trust my
> > judgement and follow my usual guideline, which is to lift the heaviest
> > weight I can lift and train as often as possible while remaining as
fresh
> as
> > possible, namely a few heavy singles done at least 3x/week and probably
> more
> > as I get used to the squatting.
> >
> > Put another way, I don't "screw around" when I lift weights, heavy or
not.
> > I pay very close and careful attention, I ask a lot of questions, I try
to
> > learn something every time I practice, and I stop well before fatigue or
> > unfamiliarity with the movement would get me into trouble. In my
opinion,
> a
> > lot of folks would do better to lift heavier more often because, after a
> > while, you have no choice but to practice good technique - it's either
> that
> > or get hurt and no one wants to get hurt.
> >
> > A learning style for the faint of heart? Certainly not, but it's what
> works
> > for me and it's what I encourage in my students now as well.
>
> Ah. Well then, good luck.

Thank you - we all need it.

-S-

> Hoff
>
>

Hoff
November 21st 03, 02:32 PM
"Steve Freides" > wrote in message
...
> > Ah. Well then, good luck.
>
> Thank you - we all need it.
>

For sure.

And BTW Steve, next time you run off to the "Party faithful" at DragonDoor,
you might want to give them the full background of the discussion.

Hoff

Jay
November 23rd 03, 01:14 PM
"Steve Freides" > wrote in message
...
> Got the rack Sunday night, did a few singles up to 165 lbs., today 4
singles
> at 185. My bodyweight is 148 lbs. so this is exactly 1.25 x bodyweight.
> Comments, good or bad, invited. Here you go, video of my first squat
> workout - this is my 4th/last rep of the day.

Great depth. Committed to no shoes, huh.
Squatting has changed for me a lot since I started box squatting.
Looks good though.