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View Full Version : power cage - need for gun rack?


David Webb
September 17th 06, 08:12 AM
I am ready to graduate from a squat rack to a power cage. I plan on ordering
online. I notice a few have a "gun rack" running up the full height of
the unit. which allows racking/unracking at multiple positions. Is this a
worthwhile option? I have only seen pictures.....does the gun rack
interfere with the safety bar placement? Any advice would be appreciated!

ATP*
September 17th 06, 01:09 PM
"David Webb" > wrote in message
link.net...
>I am ready to graduate from a squat rack to a power cage. I plan on
>ordering online. I notice a few have a "gun rack" running up the full
>height of the unit. which allows racking/unracking at multiple positions.
>Is this a worthwhile option? I have only seen pictures.....does the gun
>rack interfere with the safety bar placement? Any advice would be
>appreciated!

Most of them have holes and a bracket that fits into the holes. The safety
bar would be in a lower hole. You should go to a gym or a good supplier and
look at a few before ordering one.

Lee Michaels
September 17th 06, 09:15 PM
"David Webb" > wrote in message
link.net...
>I am ready to graduate from a squat rack to a power cage. I plan on
>ordering online. I notice a few have a "gun rack" running up the full
>height of the unit. which allows racking/unracking at multiple positions.
>Is this a worthwhile option? I have only seen pictures.....does the gun
>rack interfere with the safety bar placement? Any advice would be
>appreciated!
>
That ain't a power cage.

That is a smith machine.

There is a HUGE difference between them.

Power rack-cage good. Smith machine bad.

September 18th 06, 03:09 AM
Lee Michaels wrote:
> "David Webb" > wrote in message
> link.net...
> >I am ready to graduate from a squat rack to a power cage. I plan on
> >ordering online. I notice a few have a "gun rack" running up the full
> >height of the unit. which allows racking/unracking at multiple positions.
> >Is this a worthwhile option? I have only seen pictures.....does the gun
> >rack interfere with the safety bar placement? Any advice would be
> >appreciated!
> >
> That ain't a power cage.
>
> That is a smith machine.
>
> There is a HUGE difference between them.
>
> Power rack-cage good. Smith machine bad.

I have got to admit that from the heading I thought that surely -
even the most ardent hunter wouldn't want to park guns on a weight
lifting thing.
You never know though.

Simon
September 18th 06, 03:35 AM
wrote:

> I have got to admit that from the heading I thought that surely -
> even the most ardent hunter wouldn't want to park guns on a weight
> lifting thing.
> You never know though.

The gun rack hold guns.

The guns are to keep the curlers out of the squat rack.

--
To put it another way. Imagine an orkplace where you were the only non
executive: Make them all CEO. Give them all at least one Masters degree
and/or a PhD, and the ego trip that comes with that. Now double it.
That's education. --GB, asr

David Webb
September 18th 06, 04:56 AM
Here is New York Barbells version of a power cage with gun rack (not a
Smith machine)....Just wonder how convenient the "gun rack" attachment would
be..

http://www.newyorkbarbells.com/92563gra.html




> wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> Lee Michaels wrote:
>> "David Webb" > wrote in message
>> link.net...
>> >I am ready to graduate from a squat rack to a power cage. I plan on
>> >ordering online. I notice a few have a "gun rack" running up the full
>> >height of the unit. which allows racking/unracking at multiple
>> >positions.
>> >Is this a worthwhile option? I have only seen pictures.....does the
>> >gun
>> >rack interfere with the safety bar placement? Any advice would be
>> >appreciated!
>> >
>> That ain't a power cage.
>>
>> That is a smith machine.
>>
>> There is a HUGE difference between them.
>>
>> Power rack-cage good. Smith machine bad.
>
> I have got to admit that from the heading I thought that surely -
> even the most ardent hunter wouldn't want to park guns on a weight
> lifting thing.
> You never know though.
>

Lee Michaels
September 18th 06, 08:36 AM
"David Webb" > wrote in message
ink.net...
> Here is New York Barbells version of a power cage with gun rack (not a
> Smith machine)....Just wonder how convenient the "gun rack" attachment
> would be..
>
> http://www.newyorkbarbells.com/92563gra.html
>
>
I have not seen that particular configuration before.

It simply replaces the hook that usually supports the bar. It would be OK.
You would have to make sure you clear it with the bar.

I usually move the bar up and down very close to the rear upright. I could
bump into those hooks if I did it the usual way.

Jason Earl
September 18th 06, 07:58 PM
"Lee Michaels" > writes:

> "David Webb" > wrote in message
> ink.net...
>> Here is New York Barbells version of a power cage with gun rack (not a
>> Smith machine)....Just wonder how convenient the "gun rack" attachment
>> would be..
>>
>> http://www.newyorkbarbells.com/92563gra.html
>>
>>
> I have not seen that particular configuration before.
>
> It simply replaces the hook that usually supports the bar. It would
> be OK. You would have to make sure you clear it with the bar.
>
> I usually move the bar up and down very close to the rear upright.
> I could bump into those hooks if I did it the usual way.

On the other hand, it would make it very easy to emergency re-rack at
a lower point it something happened. As someone that tends to work
out alone I sort of like the idea, but I have never actually used a
power rack like that.

Jason

Stu
September 19th 06, 03:08 AM
Jason Earl wrote:
> On the other hand, it would make it very easy to emergency re-rack at
> a lower point it something happened. As someone that tends to work
> out alone I sort of like the idea, but I have never actually used a
> power rack like that.

Yes, but IMHO there's not a lot to be gained there vs the safety bars.
You're only really going to emergency re-rack at a lower point doing
bench or incline press. (Ie not squats, possibly shoulder press but
unlikely).

The best argument I've heard for them is that you can "walk" the bar up
to the correct height if you fail. I was thinking about this last night
when I dropped the bar onto the safety rails doing squats... it's
actually quicker and easier to unload and reload the plates, and even
if I had gun rack hooks on my power rack I'd still do it that way. I
might walk the bar up with lighter weights though (eg bench press). Of
course if you can hang-clean more than you squat it's never gonna be a
problem :-)

The gun racks might be convenient for you, or you might find they get
in the way - for me, there are other features that are more important.
Best thing I can suggest is look at lots of power racks and compare
features, and try them out in stores to find what feels best for you.

Stu

Jason Earl
September 19th 06, 07:46 PM
"Stu" > writes:

> Jason Earl wrote:
>> On the other hand, it would make it very easy to emergency re-rack at
>> a lower point it something happened. As someone that tends to work
>> out alone I sort of like the idea, but I have never actually used a
>> power rack like that.
>
> Yes, but IMHO there's not a lot to be gained there vs the safety
> bars. You're only really going to emergency re-rack at a lower
> point doing bench or incline press. (Ie not squats, possibly
> shoulder press but unlikely).

That's precisely what I was thinking. I bench alone, and so I tend to
be very cautious about approaching failure. Something like these gun
racks seem like they could be helpful.

I wouldn't use them for squats though.

> The best argument I've heard for them is that you can "walk" the bar
> up to the correct height if you fail. I was thinking about this last
> night when I dropped the bar onto the safety rails doing
> squats... it's actually quicker and easier to unload and reload the
> plates, and even if I had gun rack hooks on my power rack I'd still
> do it that way. I might walk the bar up with lighter weights though
> (eg bench press). Of course if you can hang-clean more than you
> squat it's never gonna be a problem :-)

Yeah, I can't see these being useful for squats.

> The gun racks might be convenient for you, or you might find they
> get in the way - for me, there are other features that are more
> important. Best thing I can suggest is look at lots of power racks
> and compare features, and try them out in stores to find what feels
> best for you.

I'll probably just buy a basic rack. It's nice to get some feedback
on the gun rack option though. I appreciate it.

Jason