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lalobanyc
September 17th 06, 11:49 PM
Can anyone suggest what to do with set of water filled balls when the water turns funky. In the process of moving I let the water out of the balls and was very surprised by what was growing in there. If I refilled them should I use a couple of drops of bleach in the water, should I use distilled water? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

David Cohen
September 18th 06, 03:17 AM
"lalobanyc" > wrote
>
> Can anyone suggest what to do with set of water filled balls when the
> water turns funky. In the process of moving I let the water out of the
> balls and was very surprised by what was growing in there. If I
> refilled them should I use a couple of drops of bleach in the water,
> should I use distilled water? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

Yes. Bleach. Four drops per quart.

David

Jason Earl
September 18th 06, 04:41 AM
"David Cohen" > writes:

> "lalobanyc" > wrote
>>
>> Can anyone suggest what to do with set of water filled balls when the
>> water turns funky. In the process of moving I let the water out of the
>> balls and was very surprised by what was growing in there. If I
>> refilled them should I use a couple of drops of bleach in the water,
>> should I use distilled water? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
>
> Yes. Bleach. Four drops per quart.
>
> David

Why be stingy? Bleach is cheap. If four drops is good then a half
cup ought to be great.

Jason

David Cohen
September 18th 06, 04:47 AM
"Jason Earl" > wrote
> "David Cohen" > writes:
>> "lalobanyc" > wrote
>>>
>>> Can anyone suggest what to do with set of water filled balls when the
>>> water turns funky. In the process of moving I let the water out of the
>>> balls and was very surprised by what was growing in there. If I
>>> refilled them should I use a couple of drops of bleach in the water,
>>> should I use distilled water? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
>>
>> Yes. Bleach. Four drops per quart.
>
> Why be stingy?

I'm a Jew.

Atheist Jew.

> Bleach is cheap.

Not for a starving child in Somalia, it isn't.

Good thing you give to charities and tithe and all that stuff, or you'd be
feeling pretty guilty now.

> If four drops is good then a half cup ought to be great.

On the chance that the water gets out again and gets drink...uh,
dranked...hmmm...drunk...no....uh...consumed, by a child or a dog or cat, 4
drops per quart is the amount for disinfecting dirty water, and so would be
safe.

David

Jason Earl
September 18th 06, 05:06 AM
"David Cohen" > writes:

> "Jason Earl" > wrote
>> "David Cohen" > writes:
>>> "lalobanyc" > wrote
>>>>
>>>> Can anyone suggest what to do with set of water filled balls when the
>>>> water turns funky. In the process of moving I let the water out of the
>>>> balls and was very surprised by what was growing in there. If I
>>>> refilled them should I use a couple of drops of bleach in the water,
>>>> should I use distilled water? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
>>>
>>> Yes. Bleach. Four drops per quart.
>>
>> Why be stingy?
>
> I'm a Jew.
>
> Atheist Jew.

I don't like the idea of stuff growing in my weights, but I get your
point.

>> Bleach is cheap.
>
> Not for a starving child in Somalia, it isn't.

I went to high school in Peru. They could afford bleach there, but
they probably would opt for drops instead of half cups if drops were
good enough.

> Good thing you give to charities and tithe and all that stuff, or you'd be
> feeling pretty guilty now.
>
>> If four drops is good then a half cup ought to be great.
>
> On the chance that the water gets out again and gets drink...uh,
> dranked...hmmm...drunk...no....uh...consumed, by a child or a dog or
> cat, 4 drops per quart is the amount for disinfecting dirty water,
> and so would be safe.

Now, that's a good point. That's *precisely* the sort of thing my boy
would do.

Jason

Steve Freides
September 18th 06, 04:33 PM
"Jason Earl" > wrote in message
...
> "David Cohen" > writes:
>
>> "Jason Earl" > wrote
>>> "David Cohen" > writes:
>>>> "lalobanyc" > wrote
>>>>>
>>>>> Can anyone suggest what to do with set of water filled balls when
>>>>> the
>>>>> water turns funky. In the process of moving I let the water out
>>>>> of the
>>>>> balls and was very surprised by what was growing in there. If I
>>>>> refilled them should I use a couple of drops of bleach in the
>>>>> water,
>>>>> should I use distilled water? Any help would be appreciated.
>>>>> Thanks.
>>>>
>>>> Yes. Bleach. Four drops per quart.
>>>
>>> Why be stingy?
>>
>> I'm a Jew.
>>
>> Atheist Jew.
>
> I don't like the idea of stuff growing in my weights, but I get your
> point.
>
>>> Bleach is cheap.
>>
>> Not for a starving child in Somalia, it isn't.
>
> I went to high school in Peru. They could afford bleach there, but
> they probably would opt for drops instead of half cups if drops were
> good enough.
>
>> Good thing you give to charities and tithe and all that stuff, or
>> you'd be
>> feeling pretty guilty now.
>>
>>> If four drops is good then a half cup ought to be great.
>>
>> On the chance that the water gets out again and gets drink...uh,
>> dranked...hmmm...drunk...no....uh...consumed, by a child or a dog or
>> cat, 4 drops per quart is the amount for disinfecting dirty water,
>> and so would be safe.
>
> Now, that's a good point. That's *precisely* the sort of thing my boy
> would do.
>
> Jason

FWIW, a few drops of bleach (or more, if you don't know that a few drops
will do, I think I usually use about a half a teaspoon's worth or so) is
the standard way bicycle water bottles get cleaned. The bottles get
'old' after regular use, particularly in hot weather, and the standard
remedy in our house is to let them soak filled with water plus a little
bleach on the porch (so it doesn't stink up the house) for a few hours,
then rinse several times, then let them soak filled with water and
baking soda (same stuff you put in the 'fridge to get rid of odors)
which helps get rid of the bleach smell/taste in the bottle. You need a
bit more of the baking soda (or is it baking powder? I can never
remember.) than you do the bleach - I usually use a tablespoon or two
per bottle.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com

Jason Earl
September 18th 06, 07:40 PM
"Steve Freides" > writes:

> "Jason Earl" > wrote in message
> ...
>> "David Cohen" > writes:
>>
>>> "Jason Earl" > wrote
>>>> "David Cohen" > writes:
>>>>> "lalobanyc" > wrote
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Can anyone suggest what to do with set of water filled balls when
>>>>>> the
>>>>>> water turns funky. In the process of moving I let the water out
>>>>>> of the
>>>>>> balls and was very surprised by what was growing in there. If I
>>>>>> refilled them should I use a couple of drops of bleach in the
>>>>>> water,
>>>>>> should I use distilled water? Any help would be appreciated.
>>>>>> Thanks.
>>>>>
>>>>> Yes. Bleach. Four drops per quart.
>>>>
>>>> Why be stingy?
>>>
>>> I'm a Jew.
>>>
>>> Atheist Jew.
>>
>> I don't like the idea of stuff growing in my weights, but I get your
>> point.
>>
>>>> Bleach is cheap.
>>>
>>> Not for a starving child in Somalia, it isn't.
>>
>> I went to high school in Peru. They could afford bleach there, but
>> they probably would opt for drops instead of half cups if drops were
>> good enough.
>>
>>> Good thing you give to charities and tithe and all that stuff, or
>>> you'd be
>>> feeling pretty guilty now.
>>>
>>>> If four drops is good then a half cup ought to be great.
>>>
>>> On the chance that the water gets out again and gets drink...uh,
>>> dranked...hmmm...drunk...no....uh...consumed, by a child or a dog or
>>> cat, 4 drops per quart is the amount for disinfecting dirty water,
>>> and so would be safe.
>>
>> Now, that's a good point. That's *precisely* the sort of thing my boy
>> would do.
>>
>> Jason
>
> FWIW, a few drops of bleach (or more, if you don't know that a few
> drops will do, I think I usually use about a half a teaspoon's worth
> or so) is the standard way bicycle water bottles get cleaned. The
> bottles get 'old' after regular use, particularly in hot weather,
> and the standard remedy in our house is to let them soak filled with
> water plus a little bleach on the porch (so it doesn't stink up the
> house) for a few hours, then rinse several times, then let them soak
> filled with water and baking soda (same stuff you put in the 'fridge
> to get rid of odors) which helps get rid of the bleach smell/taste
> in the bottle.

Wait a second. You mean you don't like the smell of chlorine? It
smells clean to me. Another of the side effects of living in Peru is
that I now even like the taste of chlorine :). Water that tastes
chlorinated isn't going to make my bowels flow out of my body.

> You need a bit more of the baking soda (or is it baking powder? I
> can never remember.) than you do the bleach - I usually use a
> tablespoon or two per bottle.

It's almost certainly baking soda (that's what you are supposed to put
in your fridge). Thanks for the tip.

Jason

Steve Freides
September 18th 06, 07:56 PM
"Jason Earl" > wrote in message
...
> "Steve Freides" > writes:
>
>> "Jason Earl" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> "David Cohen" > writes:
>>>
>>>> "Jason Earl" > wrote
>>>>> "David Cohen" > writes:
>>>>>> "lalobanyc" > wrote
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Can anyone suggest what to do with set of water filled balls
>>>>>>> when
>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>> water turns funky. In the process of moving I let the water out
>>>>>>> of the
>>>>>>> balls and was very surprised by what was growing in there. If I
>>>>>>> refilled them should I use a couple of drops of bleach in the
>>>>>>> water,
>>>>>>> should I use distilled water? Any help would be appreciated.
>>>>>>> Thanks.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Yes. Bleach. Four drops per quart.
>>>>>
>>>>> Why be stingy?
>>>>
>>>> I'm a Jew.
>>>>
>>>> Atheist Jew.
>>>
>>> I don't like the idea of stuff growing in my weights, but I get your
>>> point.
>>>
>>>>> Bleach is cheap.
>>>>
>>>> Not for a starving child in Somalia, it isn't.
>>>
>>> I went to high school in Peru. They could afford bleach there, but
>>> they probably would opt for drops instead of half cups if drops were
>>> good enough.
>>>
>>>> Good thing you give to charities and tithe and all that stuff, or
>>>> you'd be
>>>> feeling pretty guilty now.
>>>>
>>>>> If four drops is good then a half cup ought to be great.
>>>>
>>>> On the chance that the water gets out again and gets drink...uh,
>>>> dranked...hmmm...drunk...no....uh...consumed, by a child or a dog
>>>> or
>>>> cat, 4 drops per quart is the amount for disinfecting dirty water,
>>>> and so would be safe.
>>>
>>> Now, that's a good point. That's *precisely* the sort of thing my
>>> boy
>>> would do.
>>>
>>> Jason
>>
>> FWIW, a few drops of bleach (or more, if you don't know that a few
>> drops will do, I think I usually use about a half a teaspoon's worth
>> or so) is the standard way bicycle water bottles get cleaned. The
>> bottles get 'old' after regular use, particularly in hot weather,
>> and the standard remedy in our house is to let them soak filled with
>> water plus a little bleach on the porch (so it doesn't stink up the
>> house) for a few hours, then rinse several times, then let them soak
>> filled with water and baking soda (same stuff you put in the 'fridge
>> to get rid of odors) which helps get rid of the bleach smell/taste
>> in the bottle.
>
> Wait a second. You mean you don't like the smell of chlorine? It
> smells clean to me. Another of the side effects of living in Peru is
> that I now even like the taste of chlorine :). Water that tastes
> chlorinated isn't going to make my bowels flow out of my body.

Apparently many bikies don't mind the bleach taste and don't bother with
the second step. I never like the bleach thing due to the bleach taste,
so the baking soda tip was a good one for me.

>> You need a bit more of the baking soda (or is it baking powder? I
>> can never remember.) than you do the bleach - I usually use a
>> tablespoon or two per bottle.
>
> It's almost certainly baking soda (that's what you are supposed to put
> in your fridge). Thanks for the tip.
>
> Jason

Please tell me more about your Peru connection - how long were you
there, what from what age, is that in your ethnic background or were you
there for some other reason? Just curious. We have a very good friend,
effectively an adopted older daughter, who is from Brazil and whose
ex-boyfriend was from Peru, and she spent a lot of time hiking there and
made it sound absolutely fantastic as a vacation destination, and
inexpensive as well. It is on

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com

Jason Earl
September 18th 06, 09:40 PM
"Steve Freides" > writes:
> "Jason Earl" > wrote in message

-snip-

>> Wait a second. You mean you don't like the smell of chlorine? It
>> smells clean to me. Another of the side effects of living in Peru
>> is that I now even like the taste of chlorine :). Water that
>> tastes chlorinated isn't going to make my bowels flow out of my
>> body.
>
> Apparently many bikies don't mind the bleach taste and don't bother
> with the second step. I never like the bleach thing due to the
> bleach taste, so the baking soda tip was a good one for me.

Hydration while bicycling is definitely a personal thing. I bet my
wife would agree with you on the taste of bleach (but not the smell,
she likes the smell of chlorine).

>>> You need a bit more of the baking soda (or is it baking powder? I
>>> can never remember.) than you do the bleach - I usually use a
>>> tablespoon or two per bottle.
>>
>> It's almost certainly baking soda (that's what you are supposed to put
>> in your fridge). Thanks for the tip.
>>
>> Jason
>
> Please tell me more about your Peru connection - how long were you
> there, what from what age, is that in your ethnic background or were
> you there for some other reason?

I graduated from High School in Peru. My father was asked to be the
Mission President for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
(the Mormons). So he packed up his small-town Attorney practice and
we moved to South America for three years. I'm not Peruvian. In
fact, I stuck out like a sore thumb while I was there. I was a good
eight inches taller than the average Peruvian, and I am very fair
skinned. Most Peruvians that you see overseas are part of the small
minority that are descended from European ancestors. As such they
aren't really representative of what Peruvians look like.

> Just curious. We have a very good friend, effectively an adopted
> older daughter, who is from Brazil and whose ex-boyfriend was from
> Peru, and she spent a lot of time hiking there and made it sound
> absolutely fantastic as a vacation destination, and inexpensive as
> well. It is on

I am not sure what happened to the rest of your post, but I can
imagine that you were going to say that Peru is on your list of
possible destinations. It's certainly an interesting place to visit.
Cuzco and the remains of the Incan empire are truly amazing. What's
even more amazing is the miles and miles of beautifully green terraced
mountainsides whose construction dates back to well before the Spanish
arrived. The people that live there still live in basically the same
way that they have for hundreds of years. As you ride the train to
see Machu Pichu, for example, you'll almost certainly see farmers
trudging down the mountains with produce piled high on their backs.
If they've come down from the fields on the very top of the peaks they
are probably carrying Coca leaves.

Peru has a little bit of everything. Peru has rain forest, high
mountain jungle, and absolutely savage desert. the Atacama desert is
the driest in the world, and Ticlio has the highest railway in the
world. If you are into high adventure or ancient ruins you would be
hard pressed to find a better place to visit than Peru. Once you get
to Peru everything is ridiculously inexpensive. Heck, $5,000 gets you
a kidney in Peru.

The problem with Peru, of course, is that it is amazingly corrupt. If
you stick with established tours you should be fine, they have well
established relationships with the officials that they need to bribe,
etc. Any way you look at it, however, Peru is a lot seedier than most
Americans are comfortable with. The accommodations are likely to be
pretty rough as well. And Lima is quite possibly the ugliest city in
South America. I'll never forget the shock of my first drive through
Lima.

If you are up for a bit of adventure, however, Peru is a good bet.
Don't drink the water.

Jason

Steve Freides
September 18th 06, 11:00 PM
"Jason Earl" > wrote in message
...
> "Steve Freides" > writes:
>> "Jason Earl" > wrote in message

-snip-

>> Please tell me more about your Peru connection - how long were you
>> there, what from what age, is that in your ethnic background or were
>> you there for some other reason?
>
> I graduated from High School in Peru. My father was asked to be the
> Mission President for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
> (the Mormons). So he packed up his small-town Attorney practice and
> we moved to South America for three years. I'm not Peruvian. In
> fact, I stuck out like a sore thumb while I was there. I was a good
> eight inches taller than the average Peruvian, and I am very fair
> skinned. Most Peruvians that you see overseas are part of the small
> minority that are descended from European ancestors. As such they
> aren't really representative of what Peruvians look like.
>
>> Just curious. We have a very good friend, effectively an adopted
>> older daughter, who is from Brazil and whose ex-boyfriend was from
>> Peru, and she spent a lot of time hiking there and made it sound
>> absolutely fantastic as a vacation destination, and inexpensive as
>> well. It is on
>
> I am not sure what happened to the rest of your post, but I can
> imagine that you were going to say that Peru is on your list of
> possible destinations. It's certainly an interesting place to visit.
> Cuzco and the remains of the Incan empire are truly amazing. What's
> even more amazing is the miles and miles of beautifully green terraced
> mountainsides whose construction dates back to well before the Spanish
> arrived. The people that live there still live in basically the same
> way that they have for hundreds of years. As you ride the train to
> see Machu Pichu, for example, you'll almost certainly see farmers
> trudging down the mountains with produce piled high on their backs.
> If they've come down from the fields on the very top of the peaks they
> are probably carrying Coca leaves.
>
> Peru has a little bit of everything. Peru has rain forest, high
> mountain jungle, and absolutely savage desert. the Atacama desert is
> the driest in the world, and Ticlio has the highest railway in the
> world. If you are into high adventure or ancient ruins you would be
> hard pressed to find a better place to visit than Peru. Once you get
> to Peru everything is ridiculously inexpensive. Heck, $5,000 gets you
> a kidney in Peru.
>
> The problem with Peru, of course, is that it is amazingly corrupt. If
> you stick with established tours you should be fine, they have well
> established relationships with the officials that they need to bribe,
> etc. Any way you look at it, however, Peru is a lot seedier than most
> Americans are comfortable with. The accommodations are likely to be
> pretty rough as well. And Lima is quite possibly the ugliest city in
> South America. I'll never forget the shock of my first drive through
> Lima.
>
> If you are up for a bit of adventure, however, Peru is a good bet.
> Don't drink the water.

Cool. Yeah, I think the Internet ate the last few words of my post, or
maybe I just hit <send> too soon. (What, it's my fault? Never!) :)

Anyway, very cool. I would like to see Peru sometime. There have been
a few pieces on Peru in National Geographic over the years, and on
public TV. Definitely sounds like stay with the big tours and don't
drink the water are good advice. The latter wouldn't be a problem, but
we never go on tours when we go somewhere, so we'd have to figure all
that out.

Thanks.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com

Jason Earl
September 18th 06, 11:42 PM
"Steve Freides" > writes:

> "Jason Earl" > wrote in message
> ...
>> "Steve Freides" > writes:
>>> "Jason Earl" > wrote in message
>
> -snip-
>
>>> Please tell me more about your Peru connection - how long were you
>>> there, what from what age, is that in your ethnic background or were
>>> you there for some other reason?
>>
>> I graduated from High School in Peru. My father was asked to be the
>> Mission President for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
>> (the Mormons). So he packed up his small-town Attorney practice and
>> we moved to South America for three years. I'm not Peruvian. In
>> fact, I stuck out like a sore thumb while I was there. I was a good
>> eight inches taller than the average Peruvian, and I am very fair
>> skinned. Most Peruvians that you see overseas are part of the small
>> minority that are descended from European ancestors. As such they
>> aren't really representative of what Peruvians look like.
>>
>>> Just curious. We have a very good friend, effectively an adopted
>>> older daughter, who is from Brazil and whose ex-boyfriend was from
>>> Peru, and she spent a lot of time hiking there and made it sound
>>> absolutely fantastic as a vacation destination, and inexpensive as
>>> well. It is on
>>
>> I am not sure what happened to the rest of your post, but I can
>> imagine that you were going to say that Peru is on your list of
>> possible destinations. It's certainly an interesting place to visit.
>> Cuzco and the remains of the Incan empire are truly amazing. What's
>> even more amazing is the miles and miles of beautifully green terraced
>> mountainsides whose construction dates back to well before the Spanish
>> arrived. The people that live there still live in basically the same
>> way that they have for hundreds of years. As you ride the train to
>> see Machu Pichu, for example, you'll almost certainly see farmers
>> trudging down the mountains with produce piled high on their backs.
>> If they've come down from the fields on the very top of the peaks they
>> are probably carrying Coca leaves.
>>
>> Peru has a little bit of everything. Peru has rain forest, high
>> mountain jungle, and absolutely savage desert. the Atacama desert is
>> the driest in the world, and Ticlio has the highest railway in the
>> world. If you are into high adventure or ancient ruins you would be
>> hard pressed to find a better place to visit than Peru. Once you get
>> to Peru everything is ridiculously inexpensive. Heck, $5,000 gets you
>> a kidney in Peru.
>>
>> The problem with Peru, of course, is that it is amazingly corrupt. If
>> you stick with established tours you should be fine, they have well
>> established relationships with the officials that they need to bribe,
>> etc. Any way you look at it, however, Peru is a lot seedier than most
>> Americans are comfortable with. The accommodations are likely to be
>> pretty rough as well. And Lima is quite possibly the ugliest city in
>> South America. I'll never forget the shock of my first drive through
>> Lima.
>>
>> If you are up for a bit of adventure, however, Peru is a good bet.
>> Don't drink the water.
>
> Cool. Yeah, I think the Internet ate the last few words of my post,
> or maybe I just hit <send> too soon. (What, it's my fault? Never!)
> :)

You can always blame Microsoft...

> Anyway, very cool. I would like to see Peru sometime. There have
> been a few pieces on Peru in National Geographic over the years, and
> on public TV. Definitely sounds like stay with the big tours and
> don't drink the water are good advice. The latter wouldn't be a
> problem, but we never go on tours when we go somewhere, so we'd have
> to figure all that out.

Everyone should visit Peru once in their life, if for no other reason
than to put their own problems in perspective :). If you don't mind
roughing it a bit, and you like a taste of adventure then it is hard
to beat Peru. You are basically guaranteed a pile of good stories.

If you are serious, I've still got friends in Peru. I'd be happy to
ask them what they would recommend. My experience is a bit dated, I
haven't been back to Peru since 1990, and I haven't been to South
America since 1992.

Are there any particular places (besides Cuzco and surroundings) that
you want to see?

Jason

Steve Freides
September 19th 06, 01:42 AM
"Jason Earl" > wrote in message
...
> "Steve Freides" > writes:
>
>> "Jason Earl" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> "Steve Freides" > writes:
>>>> "Jason Earl" > wrote in message
>>
>> -snip-
>>
>>>> Please tell me more about your Peru connection - how long were you
>>>> there, what from what age, is that in your ethnic background or
>>>> were
>>>> you there for some other reason?
>>>
>>> I graduated from High School in Peru. My father was asked to be the
>>> Mission President for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day
>>> Saints
>>> (the Mormons). So he packed up his small-town Attorney practice and
>>> we moved to South America for three years. I'm not Peruvian. In
>>> fact, I stuck out like a sore thumb while I was there. I was a good
>>> eight inches taller than the average Peruvian, and I am very fair
>>> skinned. Most Peruvians that you see overseas are part of the small
>>> minority that are descended from European ancestors. As such they
>>> aren't really representative of what Peruvians look like.
>>>
>>>> Just curious. We have a very good friend, effectively an adopted
>>>> older daughter, who is from Brazil and whose ex-boyfriend was from
>>>> Peru, and she spent a lot of time hiking there and made it sound
>>>> absolutely fantastic as a vacation destination, and inexpensive as
>>>> well. It is on
>>>
>>> I am not sure what happened to the rest of your post, but I can
>>> imagine that you were going to say that Peru is on your list of
>>> possible destinations. It's certainly an interesting place to
>>> visit.
>>> Cuzco and the remains of the Incan empire are truly amazing. What's
>>> even more amazing is the miles and miles of beautifully green
>>> terraced
>>> mountainsides whose construction dates back to well before the
>>> Spanish
>>> arrived. The people that live there still live in basically the
>>> same
>>> way that they have for hundreds of years. As you ride the train to
>>> see Machu Pichu, for example, you'll almost certainly see farmers
>>> trudging down the mountains with produce piled high on their backs.
>>> If they've come down from the fields on the very top of the peaks
>>> they
>>> are probably carrying Coca leaves.
>>>
>>> Peru has a little bit of everything. Peru has rain forest, high
>>> mountain jungle, and absolutely savage desert. the Atacama desert
>>> is
>>> the driest in the world, and Ticlio has the highest railway in the
>>> world. If you are into high adventure or ancient ruins you would be
>>> hard pressed to find a better place to visit than Peru. Once you
>>> get
>>> to Peru everything is ridiculously inexpensive. Heck, $5,000 gets
>>> you
>>> a kidney in Peru.
>>>
>>> The problem with Peru, of course, is that it is amazingly corrupt.
>>> If
>>> you stick with established tours you should be fine, they have well
>>> established relationships with the officials that they need to
>>> bribe,
>>> etc. Any way you look at it, however, Peru is a lot seedier than
>>> most
>>> Americans are comfortable with. The accommodations are likely to be
>>> pretty rough as well. And Lima is quite possibly the ugliest city
>>> in
>>> South America. I'll never forget the shock of my first drive
>>> through
>>> Lima.
>>>
>>> If you are up for a bit of adventure, however, Peru is a good bet.
>>> Don't drink the water.
>>
>> Cool. Yeah, I think the Internet ate the last few words of my post,
>> or maybe I just hit <send> too soon. (What, it's my fault? Never!)
>> :)
>
> You can always blame Microsoft...
>
>> Anyway, very cool. I would like to see Peru sometime. There have
>> been a few pieces on Peru in National Geographic over the years, and
>> on public TV. Definitely sounds like stay with the big tours and
>> don't drink the water are good advice. The latter wouldn't be a
>> problem, but we never go on tours when we go somewhere, so we'd have
>> to figure all that out.
>
> Everyone should visit Peru once in their life, if for no other reason
> than to put their own problems in perspective :). If you don't mind
> roughing it a bit, and you like a taste of adventure then it is hard
> to beat Peru. You are basically guaranteed a pile of good stories.
>
> If you are serious, I've still got friends in Peru. I'd be happy to
> ask them what they would recommend. My experience is a bit dated, I
> haven't been back to Peru since 1990, and I haven't been to South
> America since 1992.
>
> Are there any particular places (besides Cuzco and surroundings) that
> you want to see?

I want to see all the extremes of climate and geography, and the
history - and ride that train.

Honestly, it won't happen for a long time, I don't think. I seem to be
wanting to go to Spanish-speaking countries. First on my list is Spain.
I'm a guitarist for many years now, and after seeing a few specials on
PBS about flamenco, I'm just dying to spend a week or two seeing the
Spanish countryside and history during the day and listening to flamenco
by night. I'd like to do the same with fado in Portugal. I don't speak
a word of Spanish (or Portuguese) but I'd learn some before going. This
is one of those vacations I envision myself taking with my wife when the
kids are grown and gone. A trip to Peru would be another such
adventure. My kids are at the age where I want to do things with them
they enjoy. Two years ago, it was visiting cousins in the UK and
Israel. This year, the Israeli cousins came here and we hung out with
them, went to water parks and the like. Next year we're talking about
trying to spend some time in Europe because it's less of a flight from
Israel and because my oldest son is a talented bicyclist who would love
to ride up the famed L'Alpe D'Huez and so would I.

I ramble ...

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com

lalobanyc
September 23rd 06, 03:48 PM
Can anyone suggest what to do with set of water filled balls when the water turns funky. In the process of moving I let the water out of the balls and was very surprised by what was growing in there. If I refilled them should I use a couple of drops of bleach in the water, should I use distilled water? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
Thanks for the advice. I can't get past the funkiness so I'm throwing them away, but will use the bleach idea for filling any replacements in the future.