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September 18th 06, 11:03 AM
Only started doing exercise about a month or so ago, for the first time
in about ten years...

Trouble is after exercise, I have very sore muscles which lasts a few
days....

What causes this? Is this normal or a sign of overdoing it?

I've heard that you need to give your body 48 hrs rest after a session
and I do this...

James Ahrens
September 18th 06, 11:21 AM
Depending on the intensity, getting sore muscles is pretty normal, its
not necessarily the case (although it is possible) that you are
overdoing it.

Lactic acid will cause soreness in a variety of ways. I presume you are
doing weights or a combination of cardio and weights, as you can get
sore from running, cycling etc as well as weights.
However, as you develop, you shouldnt be getting serious soreness every
single session.

Continuity is the key to developing a higher tolerance, and you need to
start a moderate level if you haven't trained for a while, and build it
up.
Just make sure you don't take a few days break after each session which
makes you sore in an uncomfortable way. You'll recover quicker if you
train through it, but at the right level, rather than going back to
square one, every time.

Also it helps to be doing a proper warm up, and getting your heart rate
up for a period of time before you start your session, and if you dont
have time to do it before and after a session, I recommend stretching
after your training session, especially the big muscle groups, quads,
hamstrings, glutes etc etc.

I don't know what your program is like, but it might help to have a
cycled approach to your program where you vary the intensity and length
of your workout, rather than training flat out every session, and
needing long periods fo rest.

James

www.workouts4weightloss.com



wrote:
> Only started doing exercise about a month or so ago, for the first time
> in about ten years...
>
> Trouble is after exercise, I have very sore muscles which lasts a few
> days....
>
> What causes this? Is this normal or a sign of overdoing it?
>
> I've heard that you need to give your body 48 hrs rest after a session
> and I do this...

September 18th 06, 02:16 PM
James Ahrens wrote:

> Depending on the intensity, getting sore muscles is pretty normal, its
> not necessarily the case (although it is possible) that you are
> overdoing it.
>
> Lactic acid will cause soreness in a variety of ways. I presume you are
> doing weights or a combination of cardio and weights, as you can get
> sore from running, cycling etc as well as weights.

Yep. Both.

> However, as you develop, you shouldnt be getting serious soreness every
> single session.

I thought lactic acid caused the stinging pain at the time, which
disipates quickly..

>
> Continuity is the key to developing a higher tolerance, and you need to
> start a moderate level if you haven't trained for a while, and build it
> up.
> Just make sure you don't take a few days break after each session which
> makes you sore in an uncomfortable way. You'll recover quicker if you
> train through it, but at the right level, rather than going back to
> square one, every time.
>
> Also it helps to be doing a proper warm up, and getting your heart rate
> up for a period of time before you start your session, and if you dont
> have time to do it before and after a session, I recommend stretching
> after your training session, especially the big muscle groups, quads,
> hamstrings, glutes etc etc.
>
> I don't know what your program is like, but it might help to have a
> cycled approach to your program where you vary the intensity and length
> of your workout, rather than training flat out every session, and
> needing long periods fo rest.
>

I do three sessions a week and alternate between heavy (low reps but
heaveir) and light (more reps but lighter).

> James
>
> www.workouts4weightloss.com
>
>
>
> wrote:
> > Only started doing exercise about a month or so ago, for the first time
> > in about ten years...
> >
> > Trouble is after exercise, I have very sore muscles which lasts a few
> > days....
> >
> > What causes this? Is this normal or a sign of overdoing it?
> >
> > I've heard that you need to give your body 48 hrs rest after a session
> > and I do this...

rick++
September 18th 06, 03:49 PM
Give it a few more months and it could get better.

James Ahrens
September 18th 06, 04:55 PM
Bertie,

You are right about lactic acid, it causes the immediate pain, but
doesn't really affect the soreness you experience 1-2 days later.
(It is a good idea to ensure you clear lactic acid, with light aerobic
exercise, if you train more often as it will affect your performance)

Soreness is caused by micro tears in the muscle fibre, which then has
then end effect of localised edema, that actually causes the pain.
(I'm not a doctor by the way, but these are the basics)

You can train lightly on a sore muscle, as increased blood flow to the
muscles should help.
Massage should help with both lactic acid, and muscle soreness, as will
stretching, although there are differing schools of thought on this
one.
I wouldn't recommend it, as its not necessary at your stage but some
athletes will take small doses of anti inflammatories.

On the plus side, muscle soreness can often be a sign of growth, which
is a good thing


wrote:
> James Ahrens wrote:
>
> > Depending on the intensity, getting sore muscles is pretty normal, its
> > not necessarily the case (although it is possible) that you are
> > overdoing it.
> >
> > Lactic acid will cause soreness in a variety of ways. I presume you are
> > doing weights or a combination of cardio and weights, as you can get
> > sore from running, cycling etc as well as weights.
>
> Yep. Both.
>
> > However, as you develop, you shouldnt be getting serious soreness every
> > single session.
>
> I thought lactic acid caused the stinging pain at the time, which
> disipates quickly..
>
> >
> > Continuity is the key to developing a higher tolerance, and you need to
> > start a moderate level if you haven't trained for a while, and build it
> > up.
> > Just make sure you don't take a few days break after each session which
> > makes you sore in an uncomfortable way. You'll recover quicker if you
> > train through it, but at the right level, rather than going back to
> > square one, every time.
> >
> > Also it helps to be doing a proper warm up, and getting your heart rate
> > up for a period of time before you start your session, and if you dont
> > have time to do it before and after a session, I recommend stretching
> > after your training session, especially the big muscle groups, quads,
> > hamstrings, glutes etc etc.
> >
> > I don't know what your program is like, but it might help to have a
> > cycled approach to your program where you vary the intensity and length
> > of your workout, rather than training flat out every session, and
> > needing long periods fo rest.
> >
>
> I do three sessions a week and alternate between heavy (low reps but
> heaveir) and light (more reps but lighter).
>
> > James
> >
> > www.workouts4weightloss.com
> >
> >
> >
> > wrote:
> > > Only started doing exercise about a month or so ago, for the first time
> > > in about ten years...
> > >
> > > Trouble is after exercise, I have very sore muscles which lasts a few
> > > days....
> > >
> > > What causes this? Is this normal or a sign of overdoing it?
> > >
> > > I've heard that you need to give your body 48 hrs rest after a session
> > > and I do this...

September 19th 06, 12:38 AM
James Ahrens wrote:
> Bertie,
>
> You are right about lactic acid, it causes the immediate pain, but
> doesn't really affect the soreness you experience 1-2 days later.
> (It is a good idea to ensure you clear lactic acid, with light aerobic
> exercise, if you train more often as it will affect your performance)
>
> Soreness is caused by micro tears in the muscle fibre, which then has
> then end effect of localised edema, that actually causes the pain.
> (I'm not a doctor by the way, but these are the basics)
>
> You can train lightly on a sore muscle, as increased blood flow to the
> muscles should help.
> Massage should help with both lactic acid, and muscle soreness, as will
> stretching, although there are differing schools of thought on this
> one.
> I wouldn't recommend it, as its not necessary at your stage but some
> athletes will take small doses of anti inflammatories.
>
> On the plus side, muscle soreness can often be a sign of growth, which
> is a good thing
>
>
> wrote:
> > James Ahrens wrote:
> >
> > > Depending on the intensity, getting sore muscles is pretty normal, its
> > > not necessarily the case (although it is possible) that you are
> > > overdoing it.
> > >
> > > Lactic acid will cause soreness in a variety of ways. I presume you are
> > > doing weights or a combination of cardio and weights, as you can get
> > > sore from running, cycling etc as well as weights.
> >
> > Yep. Both.
> >
> > > However, as you develop, you shouldnt be getting serious soreness every
> > > single session.
> >
> > I thought lactic acid caused the stinging pain at the time, which
> > disipates quickly..
> >
> > >
> > > Continuity is the key to developing a higher tolerance, and you need to
> > > start a moderate level if you haven't trained for a while, and build it
> > > up.
> > > Just make sure you don't take a few days break after each session which
> > > makes you sore in an uncomfortable way. You'll recover quicker if you
> > > train through it, but at the right level, rather than going back to
> > > square one, every time.
> > >
> > > Also it helps to be doing a proper warm up, and getting your heart rate
> > > up for a period of time before you start your session, and if you dont
> > > have time to do it before and after a session, I recommend stretching
> > > after your training session, especially the big muscle groups, quads,
> > > hamstrings, glutes etc etc.
> > >
> > > I don't know what your program is like, but it might help to have a
> > > cycled approach to your program where you vary the intensity and length
> > > of your workout, rather than training flat out every session, and
> > > needing long periods fo rest.
> > >
> >
> > I do three sessions a week and alternate between heavy (low reps but
> > heaveir) and light (more reps but lighter).
> >
> > > James
> > >
> > > www.workouts4weightloss.com
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > wrote:
> > > > Only started doing exercise about a month or so ago, for the first time
> > > > in about ten years...
> > > >
> > > > Trouble is after exercise, I have very sore muscles which lasts a few
> > > > days....
> > > >
> > > > What causes this? Is this normal or a sign of overdoing it?
> > > >
> > > > I've heard that you need to give your body 48 hrs rest after a session
> > > > and I do this...


Does 'delayed onset muscle soreness' ever really stop - if you keep
resistance training going , even with the day or two rest period?
I've been doing resistance training for years and even with a week off
- next time I lift weights the muscle soreness reappears 24-48 hours
later.

September 19th 06, 09:20 AM
> Soreness is caused by micro tears in the muscle fibre, which then has
> then end effect of localised edema, that actually causes the pain.
> (I'm not a doctor by the way, but these are the basics)
>
> You can train lightly on a sore muscle, as increased blood flow to the
> muscles should help.
> Massage should help with both lactic acid, and muscle soreness, as will
> stretching, although there are differing schools of thought on this
> one.
> I wouldn't recommend it, as its not necessary at your stage but some
> athletes will take small doses of anti inflammatories.
>
> On the plus side, muscle soreness can often be a sign of growth, which
> is a good thing

OK. So its not strange to experience this then?