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lordy
July 31st 08, 03:05 PM
Hi, I'm based in London, I bought a cheap Kettlebell off fleabay, as I
thought I'd test the waters first before spending a lot of money.
I got 24Kg for 40 (inc postage)
(http://stores.ebay.co.uk/pro-fit-200843)

It's certainly heavy! I just wondered if it there was any finish I could
put on it, so that it could spend more time outside in the elements.
Or is that a silly idea?

I suspect the more expensive ones have more durable finish? or are they
just more expensive for the sake of it?

Lordy

Steve Freides
July 31st 08, 07:10 PM
"lordy" > wrote in message
...
> Hi, I'm based in London, I bought a cheap Kettlebell off fleabay, as I
> thought I'd test the waters first before spending a lot of money.
> I got 24Kg for 40 (inc postage)
> (http://stores.ebay.co.uk/pro-fit-200843)
>
> It's certainly heavy! I just wondered if it there was any finish I
> could
> put on it, so that it could spend more time outside in the elements.
> Or is that a silly idea?
>
> I suspect the more expensive ones have more durable finish? or are
> they
> just more expensive for the sake of it?
>
> Lordy

It's painted black already - you shouldn't need to do more than that.
You can, of course, strip it and repaint it, apply a second coat of
paint on top of what you already have, etc. Regardless of what finish
it has, it will probably outlast you - a bit of rust won't hurt it and
can always be removed.

Most men do best to start with 16 kg - 24 kg is a lot to start with, not
impossible for some, but not usually recommended.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com

Jason Earl
July 31st 08, 07:14 PM
lordy > writes:

> Hi, I'm based in London, I bought a cheap Kettlebell off fleabay, as I
> thought I'd test the waters first before spending a lot of money. I
> got 24Kg for £40 (inc postage)
> (http://stores.ebay.co.uk/pro-fit-200843)

That looks like a perfectly acceptable kettlebell to me, and the price
was certainly right.

> It's certainly heavy! I just wondered if it there was any finish I
> could put on it, so that it could spend more time outside in the
> elements. Or is that a silly idea?

It's not silly at all. In fact, while I happen to like my kettlebell in
solid black lots of kettlebell enthusiasts seem to enjoy painting their
bells. Normal spray paint seems to be pretty popular. You can also get
fancy sprays that would probably work as well. One thing to consider is
that you probably want the handle to be fairly smooth. My kettlebell
handle is clearly smoother than the rest of the bell, if yours isn't,
then some sort of coating might actually help.

> I suspect the more expensive ones have more durable finish? or are they
> just more expensive for the sake of it?

Steve will probably chime in about how not all kettlebells are made the
same, and that's probably the case. However, assuming that you have a
cast iron kettlebell that was cast in one piece and doesn't include a
handle that was welded on after the fact your chunk of iron is probably
just like my more expensive chunk of iron.

Jason

lordy
July 31st 08, 07:29 PM
On 2008-07-31, Steve Freides > wrote:
>
> Most men do best to start with 16 kg - 24 kg is a lot to start with, not
> impossible for some, but not usually recommended.

I did quite a bit of weights for a few years. Can bench bodyweight when
'detrained' (100Kg) , but still surprised how heavy it feels.
I ordered a 20Kg too and may get a 4Kg for the missus.

Lordy

>
>

lordy
July 31st 08, 07:33 PM
On 2008-07-31, Jason Earl > wrote:
>
> It's not silly at all. In fact, while I happen to like my kettlebell in
> solid black lots of kettlebell enthusiasts seem to enjoy painting their
> bells. Normal spray paint seems to be pretty popular. You can also get
> fancy sprays that would probably work as well. One thing to consider is
> that you probably want the handle to be fairly smooth. My kettlebell
> handle is clearly smoother than the rest of the bell, if yours isn't,
> then some sort of coating might actually help.

Cheers, my house and Garden is fairly small, so they might get left
outside on occasion (as I'm not an obsessively tidy person). So I was
more concerned about the elements rather then aesthetics :)
>
> cast iron kettlebell that was cast in one piece and doesn't include a
> handle that was welded on after the fact

Hmm I was wondering about that. I'll put up a picture when I get the
chance...

Lordy

Keith[_3_]
July 31st 08, 08:20 PM
In article >,
lordy > wrote:

> On 2008-07-31, Steve Freides > wrote:
> >
> > Most men do best to start with 16 kg - 24 kg is a lot to start with, not
> > impossible for some, but not usually recommended.
>
> I did quite a bit of weights for a few years. Can bench bodyweight when
> 'detrained' (100Kg) , but still surprised how heavy it feels.
> I ordered a 20Kg too and may get a 4Kg for the missus.
>
> Lordy
>
> >
> >

Right now I have 4, the lightest being a 15 lb bell. Then a 30 lb
(adjustable), then a 45 and finally a 95 (adjustable). I'd like to say
the 15 is for the missus, but I use it as much as any other.

:^)

Jason Earl
July 31st 08, 09:16 PM
"Steve Freides" > writes:

> "lordy" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Hi, I'm based in London, I bought a cheap Kettlebell off fleabay, as I
>> thought I'd test the waters first before spending a lot of money.
>> I got 24Kg for £40 (inc postage)
>> (http://stores.ebay.co.uk/pro-fit-200843)
>>
>> It's certainly heavy! I just wondered if it there was any finish I
>> could
>> put on it, so that it could spend more time outside in the elements.
>> Or is that a silly idea?
>>
>> I suspect the more expensive ones have more durable finish? or are
>> they
>> just more expensive for the sake of it?
>>
>> Lordy
>
> It's painted black already - you shouldn't need to do more than that.
> You can, of course, strip it and repaint it, apply a second coat of
> paint on top of what you already have, etc. Regardless of what finish
> it has, it will probably outlast you - a bit of rust won't hurt it and
> can always be removed.
>
> Most men do best to start with 16 kg - 24 kg is a lot to start with, not
> impossible for some, but not usually recommended.

To a certain extent I disagree. If brand new Russian recruits can start
with 24kg, then your average American with some gym experience should be
fine with 24kg. I know I am certainly glad that I didn't go lighter.
Heck, I sort of wish I had gone heavier.

Jason

Jason Earl
July 31st 08, 09:38 PM
lordy > writes:

> On 2008-07-31, Jason Earl > wrote:
>>
>> It's not silly at all. In fact, while I happen to like my kettlebell in
>> solid black lots of kettlebell enthusiasts seem to enjoy painting their
>> bells. Normal spray paint seems to be pretty popular. You can also get
>> fancy sprays that would probably work as well. One thing to consider is
>> that you probably want the handle to be fairly smooth. My kettlebell
>> handle is clearly smoother than the rest of the bell, if yours isn't,
>> then some sort of coating might actually help.
>
> Cheers, my house and Garden is fairly small, so they might get left
> outside on occasion (as I'm not an obsessively tidy person). So I was
> more concerned about the elements rather then aesthetics :)

I live in the desert. Around here the problem with leaving a black cast
iron cannonball outside is that it is likely to get so hot from the sun
that it will burn the skin on your palms off when you try and pick it
up. :)

Even in the UK, you'd need a lot of elements before a kettlebell got so
rusty that you couldn't still swing it. As long as the handle is smooth
enough you should be fine, and at least for my tastes "smooth enough"
isn't particularly smooth.

>> cast iron kettlebell that was cast in one piece and doesn't include a
>> handle that was welded on after the fact
>
> Hmm I was wondering about that. I'll put up a picture when I get the
> chance...

If your kettlebell looks anything like the one in the ad you posted
earlier then it looked fine. Of course, I'm not a kettlebell purist by
any stretch of the imagination. I like swings and kettlebell snatches,
and I also like switching up the way I train so that I add time and reps
instead of always adding weight, but you don't need a fancy kettlebell
for any of that.

Jason

Andrzej Rosa
July 31st 08, 11:55 PM
lordy wrote:

> Hi, I'm based in London, I bought a cheap Kettlebell off fleabay, as I
> thought I'd test the waters first before spending a lot of money.
> I got 24Kg for £40 (inc postage)
> (http://stores.ebay.co.uk/pro-fit-200843)
>
> It's certainly heavy! I just wondered if it there was any finish I could
> put on it, so that it could spend more time outside in the elements.

I keep my weights outside, for what, four years already? With *no* finish.
They look rusty, but they are as heavy as when I bought them. ;-)

> Or is that a silly idea?

Well, it depends. You can put on some hammerite, spray them with a rattle
can or just let it rust. It won't rust away, even in Britain.

> I suspect the more expensive ones have more durable finish? or are they
> just more expensive for the sake of it?

I don't know, but I suspect the later.

--
Andrzej Rosa

Andrzej Rosa
August 1st 08, 12:00 AM
Jason Earl wrote:

[...]
> Even in the UK, you'd need a lot of elements before a kettlebell got so
> rusty that you couldn't still swing it.

We are talking about tens of years here. At least.

> As long as the handle is smooth

The handle is smooth if you use your equipment. Nice brown shiny
smoothness.

> enough you should be fine, and at least for my tastes "smooth enough"
> isn't particularly smooth.

Actually, that is a minor problem. You can polish it with use to the point
when it becomes quite slippery.

--
Andrzej Rosa

Andrzej Rosa
August 1st 08, 12:03 AM
Steve Freides wrote:

> It's painted black already - you shouldn't need to do more than that.
> You can, of course, strip it and repaint it, apply a second coat of
> paint on top of what you already have, etc. Regardless of what finish
> it has, it will probably outlast you - a bit of rust won't hurt it and
> can always be removed.
>
> Most men do best to start with 16 kg

You mean most men who sell kettlebells do best if people start too
light? ;-)

> - 24 kg is a lot to start with, not
> impossible for some, but not usually recommended.

Sure. Kettlebell kilos are much heavier kilos than bodybuilder kilos. ;-)

--
Andrzej Rosa

Jason Earl
August 1st 08, 12:21 AM
Andrzej Rosa > writes:

> Jason Earl wrote:
>
> [...]
>> Even in the UK, you'd need a lot of elements before a kettlebell got so
>> rusty that you couldn't still swing it.
>
> We are talking about tens of years here. At least.

That's good to know. I might someday live somewhere damp enough that
rust is a concern.

>> As long as the handle is smooth
>
> The handle is smooth if you use your equipment. Nice brown shiny
> smoothness.

My previous experience with cast iron was in dutch oven cooking. With
dutch ovens rust is bad. I figured rust was harmless on plates, but I
was concerned about the handles of kettlebells. Apparently my fear was
unfounded.

>> enough you should be fine, and at least for my tastes "smooth enough"
>> isn't particularly smooth.
>
> Actually, that is a minor problem. You can polish it with use to the
> point when it becomes quite slippery.

Thanks for the tip.

Jason

Andrzej Rosa
August 1st 08, 12:33 AM
Jason Earl wrote:

> Andrzej Rosa > writes:
>
>> Jason Earl wrote:
>>
>> [...]
>>> Even in the UK, you'd need a lot of elements before a kettlebell got so
>>> rusty that you couldn't still swing it.
>>
>> We are talking about tens of years here. At least.
>
> That's good to know. I might someday live somewhere damp enough that
> rust is a concern.
>
>>> As long as the handle is smooth
>>
>> The handle is smooth if you use your equipment. Nice brown shiny
>> smoothness.
>
> My previous experience with cast iron was in dutch oven cooking. With
> dutch ovens rust is bad. I figured rust was harmless on plates, but I
> was concerned about the handles of kettlebells. Apparently my fear was
> unfounded.

Well, I didn't live in Britain. Supposedly everything there rusts faster
due to salt in rain, but in Poland my cast iron plates spent at least four
years outside with no visible damage. They don't even look all that rusty.
I mean, for half a year they lie in mud, literally.

>>> enough you should be fine, and at least for my tastes "smooth enough"
>>> isn't particularly smooth.
>>
>> Actually, that is a minor problem. You can polish it with use to the
>> point when it becomes quite slippery.
>
> Thanks for the tip.

You mean, you didn't know that one was supposed to use those kettlebells?
HTH! ;-)

--
Andrzej Rosa

Steve Freides
August 1st 08, 04:16 AM
"lordy" > wrote in message
...
> On 2008-07-31, Steve Freides > wrote:
>>
>> Most men do best to start with 16 kg - 24 kg is a lot to start with,
>> not
>> impossible for some, but not usually recommended.
>
> I did quite a bit of weights for a few years. Can bench bodyweight
> when
> 'detrained' (100Kg) , but still surprised how heavy it feels.
> I ordered a 20Kg too and may get a 4Kg for the missus.
>
> Lordy

Use the 20 before you use the 24. I started with a 16 and, after two
weeks, I ordered a 24, but I'm glad I started with the 16 and I still
find regular use for it.

4 kg is silly-light for a kettlebell, even for your wife. Get her an 8
kg - my wife uses a mix of 8, 12, and 16 in her workouts, and for some
things like swings, even 8 kg will feel far too light.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com

Lucas Buck
August 1st 08, 06:16 AM
On Thu, 31 Jul 2008 14:05:55 GMT, lordy > wrote:

>Hi, I'm based in London, I bought a cheap Kettlebell off fleabay, as I
>thought I'd test the waters first before spending a lot of money.
>I got 24Kg for 40

Shouldn't 24kg weigh almost 53 pounds? Sounds like you got cheated. ;)

** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

Lucas Buck
August 1st 08, 06:17 AM
On Thu, 31 Jul 2008 13:20:30 -0600, Keith > wrote:

>In article >,
> lordy > wrote:
>
>> On 2008-07-31, Steve Freides > wrote:
>> >
>> > Most men do best to start with 16 kg - 24 kg is a lot to start with, not
>> > impossible for some, but not usually recommended.
>>
>> I did quite a bit of weights for a few years. Can bench bodyweight when
>> 'detrained' (100Kg) , but still surprised how heavy it feels.
>> I ordered a 20Kg too and may get a 4Kg for the missus.
>>
>> Lordy
>>
>> >
>> >
>
>Right now I have 4, the lightest being a 15 lb bell. Then a 30 lb
>(adjustable), then a 45 and finally a 95 (adjustable).

How do you "adjust" a kettlebell? Welding torch?
** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

Lucas Buck
August 1st 08, 06:18 AM
On Thu, 31 Jul 2008 12:14:47 -0600, Jason Earl > wrote:

>lordy > writes:
>
>> Hi, I'm based in London, I bought a cheap Kettlebell off fleabay, as I
>> thought I'd test the waters first before spending a lot of money. I
>> got 24Kg for 40 (inc postage)
>> (http://stores.ebay.co.uk/pro-fit-200843)
>
>That looks like a perfectly acceptable kettlebell to me, and the price
>was certainly right.
>
>> It's certainly heavy! I just wondered if it there was any finish I
>> could put on it, so that it could spend more time outside in the
>> elements. Or is that a silly idea?
>
>It's not silly at all. In fact, while I happen to like my kettlebell in
>solid black lots of kettlebell enthusiasts seem to enjoy painting their
>bells. Normal spray paint seems to be pretty popular. You can also get
>fancy sprays that would probably work as well. One thing to consider is
>that you probably want the handle to be fairly smooth.

I initially misread "bells" as... something else.

** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

Lucas Buck
August 1st 08, 06:19 AM
On Fri, 01 Aug 2008 01:33:15 +0200, Andrzej Rosa > wrote:

>Well, I didn't live in Britain. Supposedly everything there rusts faster
>due to salt in rain, but in Poland my cast iron plates spent at least four
>years outside with no visible damage. They don't even look all that rusty.
>I mean, for half a year they lie in mud, literally.

Don't worry, Andrzej. You'll get paved roads someday, too.

** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

Andrzej Rosa
August 1st 08, 12:20 PM
Lucas Buck wrote:

> On Fri, 01 Aug 2008 01:33:15 +0200, Andrzej Rosa >
> wrote:
>
>>Well, I didn't live in Britain. Supposedly everything there rusts faster
>>due to salt in rain, but in Poland my cast iron plates spent at least four
>>years outside with no visible damage. They don't even look all that
>>rusty. I mean, for half a year they lie in mud, literally.
>
> Don't worry, Andrzej. You'll get paved roads someday, too.

I hope. We got paved driveways about two years ago, so we have reasons for
hope.

--
Andrzej Rosa

Jason Earl
August 1st 08, 03:47 PM
Lucas Buck > writes:

> On Thu, 31 Jul 2008 12:14:47 -0600, Jason Earl > wrote:
>
>>lordy > writes:
>>
>>> Hi, I'm based in London, I bought a cheap Kettlebell off fleabay, as I
>>> thought I'd test the waters first before spending a lot of money. I
>>> got 24Kg for £40 (inc postage)
>>> (http://stores.ebay.co.uk/pro-fit-200843)
>>
>>That looks like a perfectly acceptable kettlebell to me, and the price
>>was certainly right.
>>
>>> It's certainly heavy! I just wondered if it there was any finish I
>>> could put on it, so that it could spend more time outside in the
>>> elements. Or is that a silly idea?
>>
>>It's not silly at all. In fact, while I happen to like my kettlebell in
>>solid black lots of kettlebell enthusiasts seem to enjoy painting their
>>bells. Normal spray paint seems to be pretty popular. You can also get
>>fancy sprays that would probably work as well. One thing to consider is
>>that you probably want the handle to be fairly smooth.
>
> I initially misread "bells" as... something else.

For my balls I prefer finger paints to spray paint. YMMV.

Jason

Jason Earl
August 1st 08, 03:51 PM
Andrzej Rosa > writes:

> Jason Earl wrote:
>
>> Andrzej Rosa > writes:
>>
>>> Jason Earl wrote:
>>>
>>> [...]
>>>> Even in the UK, you'd need a lot of elements before a kettlebell got so
>>>> rusty that you couldn't still swing it.
>>>
>>> We are talking about tens of years here. At least.
>>
>> That's good to know. I might someday live somewhere damp enough that
>> rust is a concern.
>>
>>>> As long as the handle is smooth
>>>
>>> The handle is smooth if you use your equipment. Nice brown shiny
>>> smoothness.
>>
>> My previous experience with cast iron was in dutch oven cooking. With
>> dutch ovens rust is bad. I figured rust was harmless on plates, but I
>> was concerned about the handles of kettlebells. Apparently my fear was
>> unfounded.
>
> Well, I didn't live in Britain. Supposedly everything there rusts faster
> due to salt in rain, but in Poland my cast iron plates spent at least four
> years outside with no visible damage. They don't even look all that rusty.
> I mean, for half a year they lie in mud, literally.
>
>>>> enough you should be fine, and at least for my tastes "smooth enough"
>>>> isn't particularly smooth.
>>>
>>> Actually, that is a minor problem. You can polish it with use to
>>> the point when it becomes quite slippery.
>>
>> Thanks for the tip.
>
> You mean, you didn't know that one was supposed to use those
> kettlebells? HTH! ;-)

I've got precisely one kettlebell. I have been fairly careful to keep
it out of the elements because I was afraid that the handle would rust
and I would need to refinish it or something before I could play with it
again.

That may sound like fun to some people, but it sounds like work to me.

Jason

Andrzej Rosa
August 1st 08, 09:49 PM
Jason Earl wrote:

> Lucas Buck > writes:
>
>> On Thu, 31 Jul 2008 12:14:47 -0600, Jason Earl >
>> wrote:
>>
>>>lordy > writes:
>>>
>>>> Hi, I'm based in London, I bought a cheap Kettlebell off fleabay, as I
>>>> thought I'd test the waters first before spending a lot of money. I
>>>> got 24Kg for £40 (inc postage)
>>>> (http://stores.ebay.co.uk/pro-fit-200843)
>>>
>>>That looks like a perfectly acceptable kettlebell to me, and the price
>>>was certainly right.
>>>
>>>> It's certainly heavy! I just wondered if it there was any finish I
>>>> could put on it, so that it could spend more time outside in the
>>>> elements. Or is that a silly idea?
>>>
>>>It's not silly at all. In fact, while I happen to like my kettlebell in
>>>solid black lots of kettlebell enthusiasts seem to enjoy painting their
>>>bells. Normal spray paint seems to be pretty popular. You can also get
>>>fancy sprays that would probably work as well. One thing to consider is
>>>that you probably want the handle to be fairly smooth.
>>
>> I initially misread "bells" as... something else.
>
> For my balls I prefer finger paints to spray paint. YMMV.

Oh my, you guys are so weird. I'm actually impressed! ;-)

--
Andrzej Rosa

Lucas Buck
August 1st 08, 10:43 PM
On Fri, 01 Aug 2008 08:47:16 -0600, Jason Earl > wrote:

>Lucas Buck > writes:
>
>> On Thu, 31 Jul 2008 12:14:47 -0600, Jason Earl > wrote:
>>
>>>lordy > writes:
>>>
>>>> Hi, I'm based in London, I bought a cheap Kettlebell off fleabay, as I
>>>> thought I'd test the waters first before spending a lot of money. I
>>>> got 24Kg for 40 (inc postage)
>>>> (http://stores.ebay.co.uk/pro-fit-200843)
>>>
>>>That looks like a perfectly acceptable kettlebell to me, and the price
>>>was certainly right.
>>>
>>>> It's certainly heavy! I just wondered if it there was any finish I
>>>> could put on it, so that it could spend more time outside in the
>>>> elements. Or is that a silly idea?
>>>
>>>It's not silly at all. In fact, while I happen to like my kettlebell in
>>>solid black lots of kettlebell enthusiasts seem to enjoy painting their
>>>bells. Normal spray paint seems to be pretty popular. You can also get
>>>fancy sprays that would probably work as well. One thing to consider is
>>>that you probably want the handle to be fairly smooth.
>>
>> I initially misread "bells" as... something else.
>
>For my balls I prefer finger paints to spray paint. YMMV.
>
>Jason

To each his own.

I prefer cheerleader saliva.

** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

Shava_X
August 3rd 08, 01:02 AM
On Thu, 31 Jul 2008 22:17:39 -0700, Lucas Buck wrote:

> On Thu, 31 Jul 2008 13:20:30 -0600, Keith > wrote:
>
>>In article >,
>> lordy > wrote:
>>
>>> On 2008-07-31, Steve Freides > wrote:
>>> >
>>> > Most men do best to start with 16 kg - 24 kg is a lot to start with,
>>> > not impossible for some, but not usually recommended.
>>>
>>> I did quite a bit of weights for a few years. Can bench bodyweight
>>> when 'detrained' (100Kg) , but still surprised how heavy it feels. I
>>> ordered a 20Kg too and may get a 4Kg for the missus.
>>>
>>> Lordy
>>>
>>>
>>> >
>>> >
>>Right now I have 4, the lightest being a 15 lb bell. Then a 30 lb
>>(adjustable), then a 45 and finally a 95 (adjustable).
>
> How do you "adjust" a kettlebell? Welding torch? ** Posted from
> http://www.teranews.com **


There are several ways to do that ->
www.packweight.com
www.kettlestack.com
www.uskettlebells.com