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Cineabeagle
January 22nd 04, 01:39 AM
Used to do squats at home until I developed slight knee problems. Loved the
squats with a bar--worked great. LOVE to work my quads. Does anyone know of
any exercises I can do at home (no equipment) that will sculpt quads/
hamstrings as well as squatting with weights?

Thanks
Lee

Keith Hobman
January 22nd 04, 01:51 AM
In article >,
(Cineabeagle) wrote:

> Used to do squats at home until I developed slight knee problems. Loved the
> squats with a bar--worked great. LOVE to work my quads. Does anyone know of
> any exercises I can do at home (no equipment) that will sculpt quads/
> hamstrings as well as squatting with weights?

Did the squats cause the knees problems? Because I resolved my knee
problems by squatting.

So...

1. What exactly are the knee problems you refer to.

If they are caused by squats

2. How did you perform the squats? What depth, what foot spacing, etc.

Brux Brule
January 22nd 04, 02:21 AM
"Cineabeagle" > wrote in message
...
> Used to do squats at home until I developed slight knee problems. Loved
the
> squats with a bar--worked great. LOVE to work my quads. Does anyone know
of
> any exercises I can do at home (no equipment) that will sculpt quads/
> hamstrings as well as squatting with weights?
>
> Thanks
> Lee

http://exrx.net/Lists/ExList/ThighWt.html

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~`
Brux Brule (hard core & old school)

"Quit your whining, shut up and train."

Wayne S. Hill
January 22nd 04, 02:52 AM
Cineabeagle wrote:

> Used to do squats at home until I developed slight knee
> problems. Loved the squats with a bar--worked great. LOVE
> to work my quads. Does anyone know of any exercises I can
> do at home (no equipment) that will sculpt quads/ hamstrings
> as well as squatting with weights?

Stepups are pretty good, probably better than anything BUT
squats. They're also a pretty good rehab exercise for the kind
of knee pain you probably had with squats. You can start with
no weight and a low step and add weight/height until you are
truly challenged.

--
-Wayne

Steve Freides
January 22nd 04, 03:24 PM
"Cineabeagle" > wrote in message
...
> Used to do squats at home until I developed slight knee problems. Loved
the
> squats with a bar--worked great. LOVE to work my quads. Does anyone know
of
> any exercises I can do at home (no equipment) that will sculpt quads/
> hamstrings as well as squatting with weights?

As Keith says, what will work for you in this situation depends a lot on
exactly what your problem is but, if moving your knee through a full range
of motion is comfortable for you, that full range of motion can actually be
beneficial to the health of your joints. It's one of those "if it doesn't
make you worse it will make you better" kinds of things - if your knees
aren't up to it because of your injury, don't do it, but if they are, full
range of motion is great. It's not quite clear from your message whether
you have weights at home now or not - you say "at home (no equipment)" but
you also indicate you used to squat with a bar at home. If you have a bar,
you might find squatting without knee pain is as simple as focusing on
proper tracking of the knees to the feet, full depth, and not worrying too
much about having a lot of weight on the bar. High bar Olympic-style
squats, overhead squats, and front squats are all fine choices here.

One-legged squats are my weightless quad exercise of choice - they require a
good deal of balance and core tightness just to do at all, let alone with
any additional weight, and additional weight is easily added with a dumbbell
if you wish. They do tax everything that stabilizes the knee which can be a
good or a bad thing for you depending on the current state of your knees.
They are performed by holding one leg straight out in front of you while
squatting to full depth with the other. One-legged squats can be performed
to a step or box to limit depth and a door-knob or other assistance can be
used to hold onto and pull yourself back up while learning.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com

Steve Freides
January 22nd 04, 04:46 PM
A success story with one-legged squats just appeared on the DragonDoor
forum - from a Canadian Rugby coach.

http://forum.dragondoor.com/index.pl?smessage=251373

I had to post this just so that Wayne doesn't think I'm the only one giving
advice like this. :)

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com


"Steve Freides" > wrote in message
...
> "Cineabeagle" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Used to do squats at home until I developed slight knee problems. Loved
> the
> > squats with a bar--worked great. LOVE to work my quads. Does anyone
know
> of
> > any exercises I can do at home (no equipment) that will sculpt quads/
> > hamstrings as well as squatting with weights?
>
> As Keith says, what will work for you in this situation depends a lot on
> exactly what your problem is but, if moving your knee through a full range
> of motion is comfortable for you, that full range of motion can actually
be
> beneficial to the health of your joints. It's one of those "if it doesn't
> make you worse it will make you better" kinds of things - if your knees
> aren't up to it because of your injury, don't do it, but if they are, full
> range of motion is great. It's not quite clear from your message whether
> you have weights at home now or not - you say "at home (no equipment)" but
> you also indicate you used to squat with a bar at home. If you have a
bar,
> you might find squatting without knee pain is as simple as focusing on
> proper tracking of the knees to the feet, full depth, and not worrying too
> much about having a lot of weight on the bar. High bar Olympic-style
> squats, overhead squats, and front squats are all fine choices here.
>
> One-legged squats are my weightless quad exercise of choice - they require
a
> good deal of balance and core tightness just to do at all, let alone with
> any additional weight, and additional weight is easily added with a
dumbbell
> if you wish. They do tax everything that stabilizes the knee which can be
a
> good or a bad thing for you depending on the current state of your knees.
> They are performed by holding one leg straight out in front of you while
> squatting to full depth with the other. One-legged squats can be
performed
> to a step or box to limit depth and a door-knob or other assistance can
be
> used to hold onto and pull yourself back up while learning.
>
> -S-
> http://www.kbnj.com
>
>

Sooky Grumper
January 22nd 04, 04:56 PM
Cineabeagle wrote:
> Used to do squats at home until I developed slight knee problems. Loved the
> squats with a bar--worked great. LOVE to work my quads. Does anyone know of
> any exercises I can do at home (no equipment) that will sculpt quads/
> hamstrings as well as squatting with weights?
>
> Thanks
> Lee

As others have asked: what are the knee problems? Anything that we might
recommend could make them worse! That's why I'd advise talking to a
physiotherapist that's familiar with your individual knee problems.
Offhand, bicycle sprinting (have you seen the size of those guys' and
gals' thighs???), perhaps sissy squats. Front or side lunges will
probably be too much like squats to be doable, but you never know, maybe
your body doesn't like squats but can handle the lunges. I'm wondering
why you specify 'no equipment'? Where were you squatting that had the
equipment in the first place? Are you no longer a gym member?

--
spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

Cineabeagle
January 23rd 04, 01:07 AM
>wondering
>why you specify 'no equipment'? Where were you squatting that had the
>equipment in the first place? Are you no longer a gym member?
>

Hi and thanks to all who have replied so far. To answer some questions-- I
have just noticed some general deterioration of my knee (cracking mostly) since
doing squats for a few years that I never had before, and I guess I just don't
want to continue wearing it down if that is in fact what is happening. When I
say no equipment, I mean I do have dumbells and a bar, just no machines at
home. I am working at home right now for the next six months and cannot spare
the time to travel to the gym (to which I do have a membership) --need to get
the workouts in at home right now. I am really grateful for all the really
detailed replies I've gotten.

Thanks Again--
Lee

Hugh Beyer
January 23rd 04, 01:57 AM
(Cineabeagle) wrote in
:

>>wondering
>>why you specify 'no equipment'? Where were you squatting that had the
>>equipment in the first place? Are you no longer a gym member?
>>
>
> Hi and thanks to all who have replied so far. To answer some
> questions-- I have just noticed some general deterioration of my knee
> (cracking mostly) since doing squats for a few years that I never had
> before, and I guess I just don't want to continue wearing it down if
> that is in fact what is happening. When I say no equipment, I mean I do
> have dumbells and a bar, just no machines at home. I am working at home
> right now for the next six months and cannot spare the time to travel to
> the gym (to which I do have a membership) --need to get the workouts in
> at home right now. I am really grateful for all the really detailed
> replies I've gotten.
>
> Thanks Again--
> Lee
>

That's it. All he's got are these useless lumps of iron, a plain bar, and
these stupid disks with holes in the middle.

Hugh


--
Help! My myofibrillar material is disorganized!

Steve Freides
January 23rd 04, 02:22 AM
More on one-legged squats - a nice article that contains enough information
for anyone to learn to do these themselves:

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/mahler2.htm

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com


"Steve Freides" > wrote in message
...
> "Cineabeagle" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Used to do squats at home until I developed slight knee problems. Loved
> the
> > squats with a bar--worked great. LOVE to work my quads. Does anyone
know
> of
> > any exercises I can do at home (no equipment) that will sculpt quads/
> > hamstrings as well as squatting with weights?
>
> As Keith says, what will work for you in this situation depends a lot on
> exactly what your problem is but, if moving your knee through a full range
> of motion is comfortable for you, that full range of motion can actually
be
> beneficial to the health of your joints. It's one of those "if it doesn't
> make you worse it will make you better" kinds of things - if your knees
> aren't up to it because of your injury, don't do it, but if they are, full
> range of motion is great. It's not quite clear from your message whether
> you have weights at home now or not - you say "at home (no equipment)" but
> you also indicate you used to squat with a bar at home. If you have a
bar,
> you might find squatting without knee pain is as simple as focusing on
> proper tracking of the knees to the feet, full depth, and not worrying too
> much about having a lot of weight on the bar. High bar Olympic-style
> squats, overhead squats, and front squats are all fine choices here.
>
> One-legged squats are my weightless quad exercise of choice - they require
a
> good deal of balance and core tightness just to do at all, let alone with
> any additional weight, and additional weight is easily added with a
dumbbell
> if you wish. They do tax everything that stabilizes the knee which can be
a
> good or a bad thing for you depending on the current state of your knees.
> They are performed by holding one leg straight out in front of you while
> squatting to full depth with the other. One-legged squats can be
performed
> to a step or box to limit depth and a door-knob or other assistance can
be
> used to hold onto and pull yourself back up while learning.
>
> -S-
> http://www.kbnj.com
>
>

Steve Freides
January 23rd 04, 02:29 AM
Yet more on the "pistol" or one-legged squat - this time from the master,
the man who can do a single rep while holding 140 lbs. and 80 reps for each
leg, Steven Cotter.

http://www.powerathletesmag.com/pages/pistols.htm

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com


"Steve Freides" > wrote in message
...
> "Cineabeagle" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Used to do squats at home until I developed slight knee problems. Loved
> the
> > squats with a bar--worked great. LOVE to work my quads. Does anyone
know
> of
> > any exercises I can do at home (no equipment) that will sculpt quads/
> > hamstrings as well as squatting with weights?
>
> As Keith says, what will work for you in this situation depends a lot on
> exactly what your problem is but, if moving your knee through a full range
> of motion is comfortable for you, that full range of motion can actually
be
> beneficial to the health of your joints. It's one of those "if it doesn't
> make you worse it will make you better" kinds of things - if your knees
> aren't up to it because of your injury, don't do it, but if they are, full
> range of motion is great. It's not quite clear from your message whether
> you have weights at home now or not - you say "at home (no equipment)" but
> you also indicate you used to squat with a bar at home. If you have a
bar,
> you might find squatting without knee pain is as simple as focusing on
> proper tracking of the knees to the feet, full depth, and not worrying too
> much about having a lot of weight on the bar. High bar Olympic-style
> squats, overhead squats, and front squats are all fine choices here.
>
> One-legged squats are my weightless quad exercise of choice - they require
a
> good deal of balance and core tightness just to do at all, let alone with
> any additional weight, and additional weight is easily added with a
dumbbell
> if you wish. They do tax everything that stabilizes the knee which can be
a
> good or a bad thing for you depending on the current state of your knees.
> They are performed by holding one leg straight out in front of you while
> squatting to full depth with the other. One-legged squats can be
performed
> to a step or box to limit depth and a door-knob or other assistance can
be
> used to hold onto and pull yourself back up while learning.
>
> -S-
> http://www.kbnj.com
>
>

Steve Freides
January 23rd 04, 03:01 AM
"Cineabeagle" > wrote in message
...
> >wondering
> >why you specify 'no equipment'? Where were you squatting that had the
> >equipment in the first place? Are you no longer a gym member?
> >
>
> Hi and thanks to all who have replied so far. To answer some questions--
I
> have just noticed some general deterioration of my knee (cracking mostly)
since
> doing squats for a few years that I never had before, and I guess I just
don't
> want to continue wearing it down if that is in fact what is happening.
When I
> say no equipment, I mean I do have dumbells and a bar, just no machines at
> home. I am working at home right now for the next six months and cannot
spare
> the time to travel to the gym (to which I do have a membership) --need to
get
> the workouts in at home right now. I am really grateful for all the
really
> detailed replies I've gotten.

Joints are "use it or lose it" kinds of things. The best thing for
creaking, clicking joints - in my opinion, if your doctor ok's it, blah,
blah, blah - is to put them through their full range of motion, many times,
every day. The book from which I learned to do this is Pavel Tsatsouline's
"Super Joints" - see http://www.kbnj.com/sj.htm for more on the book on the
publisher's web site.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com

Sooky Grumper
January 23rd 04, 04:37 AM
Cineabeagle wrote:
>>wondering
>>why you specify 'no equipment'? Where were you squatting that had the
>>equipment in the first place? Are you no longer a gym member?
>>
>
>
> Hi and thanks to all who have replied so far. To answer some questions-- I
> have just noticed some general deterioration of my knee (cracking mostly) since
> doing squats for a few years that I never had before, and I guess I just don't
> want to continue wearing it down if that is in fact what is happening.

Cracking is normal in some people. Best talk to your doctor. If you're a
fairly young bloke, you don't want to end up letting the joints
deteriorate if there is indeed a problem that could be easilly treated
before it turns into something that cannot be so easilly treated. If the
doc says you're fine, then you can stop worrying and free up that mental
energy to use it for better things.

> When I
> say no equipment, I mean I do have dumbells and a bar, just no machines at
> home.

Well, side lunges or front lunges with dumbbells will probably stress
the knees more than squats. Sissy squats too I'm afraid. Do you have a
bicycle? Interval sprinting on that will give you a good quad workout as
well as some good cardio benefits!

> I am working at home right now for the next six months and cannot spare
> the time to travel to the gym (to which I do have a membership) --need to get
> the workouts in at home right now. I am really grateful for all the really
> detailed replies I've gotten.
>
> Thanks Again--
> Lee


--
spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

JmS
January 23rd 04, 12:52 PM
> Stepups are pretty good, probably better than anything BUT
> squats. They're also a pretty good rehab exercise for the kind

The Russians and Bulgarians reckon stepups are _better_ than squats.

Wayne S. Hill
January 23rd 04, 02:18 PM
JmS wrote:

>> Stepups are pretty good, probably better than anything BUT
>> squats. They're also a pretty good rehab exercise for the
>> kind
>
> The Russians and Bulgarians reckon stepups are _better_ than
> squats.

There's a web page somewhere that makes that claim, but I don't
believe that's taken seriously by those "in the know". If you
go to Russia or Bulgaria, you won't see athletes doing step-ups
instead of squats, but might see them done as a squat assistance
exercise.

--
-Wayne

Keith Hobman
January 23rd 04, 02:35 PM
In article >, "Wayne S. Hill"
> wrote:

> JmS wrote:
>
> >> Stepups are pretty good, probably better than anything BUT
> >> squats. They're also a pretty good rehab exercise for the
> >> kind
> >
> > The Russians and Bulgarians reckon stepups are _better_ than
> > squats.
>
> There's a web page somewhere that makes that claim, but I don't
> believe that's taken seriously by those "in the know". If you
> go to Russia or Bulgaria, you won't see athletes doing step-ups
> instead of squats, but might see them done as a squat assistance
> exercise.

Its bs, pure and simple. And they throw in a few Bulgarian names, but the
Bulgarian coaches and athletes who come over here all recommend squatting.

The step-up has its place in training, but its not a replacement for squats.

--
Keith Hobman

--- email address above is a non-monitored spam sink.

JmS
January 24th 04, 09:49 AM
> There's a web page somewhere that makes that claim, but I don't
> believe that's taken seriously by those "in the know". If you
> go to Russia or Bulgaria, you won't see athletes doing step-ups
> instead of squats, but might see them done as a squat assistance
> exercise.

It seems you are right.
I did some more searching, and squats are still very much in use.
And just after I started a program of heavy step-ups! <G>

Julio
January 25th 04, 06:18 PM
(Cineabeagle) wrote in
:

> Used to do squats at home until I developed slight knee problems.
> Loved the squats with a bar--worked great. LOVE to work my quads.
> Does anyone know of any exercises I can do at home (no equipment) that
> will sculpt quads/ hamstrings as well as squatting with weights?
Don't know the specifics of your knee problem. I started squatting about 8
mos ago. Listened to the testimonials here but not the details. Really
messed up my messed up knee (no ACL, no med or lat meniscus, "end stage"
degen changes, "bone on bone", etc.) took a month off and started with no
weights just working on form for a month or so (while I was doing HST c/
quad extensions and sitting leg press, I'd throw in a few reps just
stabilizing by lightly grasping something like the pins on the squat rack).
Watched where my knees wound up, not forward of my toes, worked on
flexibility, balance, going low, etc. Then started back real light and
gradually worked up. Not only did I avoid aggravating my knee, my knee felt
better than it had since my tibial plateau fracture 3 years ago and I kinda
got hooked on squats - until I had my hernia fixed a week ago. Now I'm just
walking on the treadmill, which is allowed, and my knee feels like crap
again.
Getting old(er) sucks.

Julio
January 25th 04, 06:20 PM
"Steve Freides" > wrote in
:

> "Cineabeagle" > wrote in message
> ...
> if moving your knee through a
> full range of motion is comfortable for you, that full range of motion
> can actually be beneficial to the health of your joints. It's one of
> those "if it doesn't make you worse it will make you better" kinds of
> things - if your knees aren't up to it because of your injury, don't
> do it, but if they are, full range of motion is great.
Could not agree more. Full range of motion is the key.

Ken Palmateer
July 17th 04, 01:56 PM
On Thu, 22 Jan 2004 22:01:52 -0500, "Steve Freides"
> wrote:

>Joints are "use it or lose it" kinds of things. The best thing for
>creaking, clicking joints -

I'd say muscles are a "use it or lose it kind of thing." Joints are
"use it and lose it" deal. That's the nature of the beast. It's
called "getting old". Anything else is denial. Ken

Lyle McDonald
July 17th 04, 03:15 PM
Ken Palmateer wrote:

> On Thu, 22 Jan 2004 22:01:52 -0500, "Steve Freides"
> > wrote:
>
>
>>Joints are "use it or lose it" kinds of things. The best thing for
>>creaking, clicking joints -
>
>
> I'd say muscles are a "use it or lose it kind of thing." Joints are
> "use it and lose it" deal. That's the nature of the beast. It's
> called "getting old". Anything else is denial. Ken

Must be why arthritic folks feel better when they engage in regular
activity.

Lyle

geek_girl
July 17th 04, 06:35 PM
In > Ken Palmateer wrote:
> On Thu, 22 Jan 2004 22:01:52 -0500, "Steve Freides"
> > wrote:
>
>>Joints are "use it or lose it" kinds of things. The best thing for
>>creaking, clicking joints -
>
> I'd say muscles are a "use it or lose it kind of thing." Joints are
> "use it and lose it" deal. That's the nature of the beast. It's
> called "getting old". Anything else is denial. Ken

Care to explain why my knees get cranky when I *don't* squat and my
ankles hurt if I *don't* do calf raises?