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Ray
May 23rd 09, 08:42 PM
http://www.express.co.uk/features/view/102818/Big-muscles-cut-cancer-risk-by-40-

Tom Anderson
May 24th 09, 12:25 AM
On Sat, 23 May 2009, Ray wrote:

> http://www.express.co.uk/features/view/102818/Big-muscles-cut-cancer-risk-by-40-

Interesting stuff. A nice complement to the story about free radicals and
insulin response someone posted the the other day, too.

tom

--
Is that dark pixel a prox mine or a bullet hole? HERE COME THE PROX MINE
SWEATS! -- D

ATP*
May 26th 09, 12:17 AM
"Ray" > wrote in message
...
> http://www.express.co.uk/features/view/102818/Big-muscles-cut-cancer-risk-by-40-

Interesting, may be something to it. But people who feel run down are not
likely to spend much time in the weight room, so that could skew the
statistics. Also, people tend to stick with things they excel at, so if
you're a decent weightlifter due to genetics, it's more likely you'll keep
lifting and those genetics may be the protective factor rather than the
lifting.

Jason Earl[_2_]
May 26th 09, 05:40 AM
"ATP*" > writes:

> "Ray" > wrote in message
> ...
>> http://www.express.co.uk/features/view/102818/Big-muscles-cut-cancer-risk-by-40-
>
> Interesting, may be something to it. But people who feel run down are
> not likely to spend much time in the weight room, so that could skew
> the statistics. Also, people tend to stick with things they excel at,
> so if you're a decent weightlifter due to genetics, it's more likely
> you'll keep lifting and those genetics may be the protective factor
> rather than the lifting.

Either way, it is good news for folks that lift. For whatever reason it
would appear that people who follow this particular lifestyle tend to be
less susceptible to certain forms of cancer.

Whether weight training gives people a defense against cancer, or weight
training draws people that already have a genetic resistance to cancer
it doesn't really matter to us. Either way, we fit the profile. I
don't see how that could be construed as anything but good news for MFW.

Jason

Keith[_4_]
May 26th 09, 03:08 PM
In article >,
"ATP*" > wrote:

> "Ray" > wrote in message
> ...
> > http://www.express.co.uk/features/view/102818/Big-muscles-cut-cancer-risk-by
> > -40-
>
> Interesting, may be something to it. But people who feel run down are not
> likely to spend much time in the weight room, so that could skew the
> statistics. Also, people tend to stick with things they excel at, so if
> you're a decent weightlifter due to genetics, it's more likely you'll keep
> lifting and those genetics may be the protective factor rather than the
> lifting.

I think the point is that exercise - including, but not limited to
strength training - has benefits.

And people who feel run down should spend time in the weight room. The
genetics argument - maybe. But research after research shows the
benefits of exercise.

R P
May 29th 09, 01:37 PM
The reward / result of exercise in terms of appearance are {IMO}
largely based on genetics. {if you possess perfect genes,..you'll look
great}

But I think the true reward / result of exercise is seldom "seen". I
firmly believe it's just plain good for you!....

BTW; no I don't have perfect genes or look all that terrific either<g>.

But I will say,..on a-day-to-day basis i "feel" pretty dog-gone
good!....& I think a large part of that is due to regular exercise.

If the true "couch-potatoes" would just try it for {I'll say a
month}....I think they would be amazed.......just my 2
Ron,in Ohio