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Chris
March 24th 04, 03:29 AM
Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it felt good in my
shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was lifting then went back
to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so I decided to do them at 70 deg.
My question is has anybody done this and had good results with it here that
they wouldnt mind sharing? Any thoughts would be great..

Chris

gman99
March 24th 04, 05:06 PM
"Paul Cassel" > wrote:
> Chris wrote:
> > Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
> > millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's
>
> >
> You have just invented the inclined bench press.
>
LOL...almost fell off my chair !!

gman99
March 24th 04, 05:06 PM
"Paul Cassel" > wrote:
> Chris wrote:
> > Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
> > millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's
>
> >
> You have just invented the inclined bench press.
>
LOL...almost fell off my chair !!

Paul Cassel
March 24th 04, 05:08 PM
Chris wrote:
> Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
> millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's

>
You have just invented the inclined bench press.

-paul

Paul Cassel
March 24th 04, 05:08 PM
Chris wrote:
> Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
> millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's

>
You have just invented the inclined bench press.

-paul

Chicago Dave
March 24th 04, 08:33 PM
dear god

help me

LOL!!!!

Chicago Dave
March 24th 04, 08:33 PM
dear god

help me

LOL!!!!

Chris
March 24th 04, 08:53 PM
well its unfortunate how stupid you sound. I know it involves upper chest
retard. read the post and if you don't understand it ask questions don't
reply and look like an idiot and for you followers I would suggest doing the
same..

Chris
"Paul Cassel" > wrote in message
...
> Chris wrote:
> > Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
> > millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's
>
> >
> You have just invented the inclined bench press.
>
> -paul
>
>

Chris
March 24th 04, 08:53 PM
well its unfortunate how stupid you sound. I know it involves upper chest
retard. read the post and if you don't understand it ask questions don't
reply and look like an idiot and for you followers I would suggest doing the
same..

Chris
"Paul Cassel" > wrote in message
...
> Chris wrote:
> > Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
> > millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's
>
> >
> You have just invented the inclined bench press.
>
> -paul
>
>

Jeff Finlayson
March 24th 04, 09:45 PM
Chris wrote:
> "Paul Cassel" > wrote
>> Chris wrote:
>>
>>>Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
>>>millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's
>>
>>You have just invented the inclined bench press.

> well its unfortunate how stupid you sound. I know it involves upper chest

That IS a high angle incline bench press. The incline makes it work
the mid delt less. If you're trying to work delts, I don't see the
point any than possibly using more weight.

Jeff Finlayson
March 24th 04, 09:45 PM
Chris wrote:
> "Paul Cassel" > wrote
>> Chris wrote:
>>
>>>Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
>>>millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's
>>
>>You have just invented the inclined bench press.

> well its unfortunate how stupid you sound. I know it involves upper chest

That IS a high angle incline bench press. The incline makes it work
the mid delt less. If you're trying to work delts, I don't see the
point any than possibly using more weight.

Chris
March 24th 04, 10:21 PM
thats it more wieght
"Jeff Finlayson" > wrote in message
...
> Chris wrote:
> > "Paul Cassel" > wrote
> >> Chris wrote:
> >>
> >>>Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
> >>>millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's
> >>
> >>You have just invented the inclined bench press.
>
> > well its unfortunate how stupid you sound. I know it involves upper
chest
>
> That IS a high angle incline bench press. The incline makes it work
> the mid delt less. If you're trying to work delts, I don't see the
> point any than possibly using more weight.
>

Chris
March 24th 04, 10:21 PM
thats it more wieght
"Jeff Finlayson" > wrote in message
...
> Chris wrote:
> > "Paul Cassel" > wrote
> >> Chris wrote:
> >>
> >>>Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
> >>>millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's
> >>
> >>You have just invented the inclined bench press.
>
> > well its unfortunate how stupid you sound. I know it involves upper
chest
>
> That IS a high angle incline bench press. The incline makes it work
> the mid delt less. If you're trying to work delts, I don't see the
> point any than possibly using more weight.
>

Keith Hobman
March 25th 04, 02:47 AM
In article >, "Chris"
> wrote:

> Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
> millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it felt good in my
> shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was lifting then went back
> to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so I decided to do them at 70 deg.
> My question is has anybody done this and had good results with it here that
> they wouldnt mind sharing? Any thoughts would be great..
>
Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military press.
You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are basically
changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight to be used
because you use the chest as well as the delts.

Keith Hobman
March 25th 04, 02:47 AM
In article >, "Chris"
> wrote:

> Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
> millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it felt good in my
> shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was lifting then went back
> to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so I decided to do them at 70 deg.
> My question is has anybody done this and had good results with it here that
> they wouldnt mind sharing? Any thoughts would be great..
>
Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military press.
You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are basically
changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight to be used
because you use the chest as well as the delts.

bc
March 25th 04, 04:41 AM
On Wed, 24 Mar 2004 20:47:22 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
wrote:

>In article >, "Chris"
> wrote:
>
>> Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
>> millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it felt good in my
>> shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was lifting then went back
>> to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so I decided to do them at 70 deg.
>> My question is has anybody done this and had good results with it here that
>> they wouldnt mind sharing? Any thoughts would be great..
>>
>Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military press.
>You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are basically
>changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight to be used
>because you use the chest as well as the delts.

Just today, I was doing dumbell military presses. Out of curiousity,
I tried standing verses seated - but no backrest. I found that the
standing allowed me to handle more weight, mostly because it was a
little easier to get the dumbells up to my shoulders. I found that I
had to watch for tension in my lower back on the standing ones though.

- bc

bc
March 25th 04, 04:41 AM
On Wed, 24 Mar 2004 20:47:22 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
wrote:

>In article >, "Chris"
> wrote:
>
>> Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
>> millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it felt good in my
>> shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was lifting then went back
>> to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so I decided to do them at 70 deg.
>> My question is has anybody done this and had good results with it here that
>> they wouldnt mind sharing? Any thoughts would be great..
>>
>Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military press.
>You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are basically
>changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight to be used
>because you use the chest as well as the delts.

Just today, I was doing dumbell military presses. Out of curiousity,
I tried standing verses seated - but no backrest. I found that the
standing allowed me to handle more weight, mostly because it was a
little easier to get the dumbells up to my shoulders. I found that I
had to watch for tension in my lower back on the standing ones though.

- bc

Jeff Finlayson
March 25th 04, 05:18 AM
"Chris" > wrote:
> "Jeff Finlayson" wrote
> > Chris wrote:
> > > "Paul Cassel" wisely wrote
> > >> Chris wrote:
> > >>
> > >>>Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
> > >>>millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's
> > >>
> > >>You have just invented the inclined bench press.
> >
> > > well its unfortunate how stupid you sound. I know it involves upper
> > > chest
> >
> > That IS a high angle incline bench press. The incline makes it work
> > the mid delt less. If you're trying to work delts, I don't see the
> > point any than possibly using more weight.

> thats it more wieght

Yea, good for the ego and all..

Jeff Finlayson
March 25th 04, 05:18 AM
"Chris" > wrote:
> "Jeff Finlayson" wrote
> > Chris wrote:
> > > "Paul Cassel" wisely wrote
> > >> Chris wrote:
> > >>
> > >>>Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
> > >>>millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's
> > >>
> > >>You have just invented the inclined bench press.
> >
> > > well its unfortunate how stupid you sound. I know it involves upper
> > > chest
> >
> > That IS a high angle incline bench press. The incline makes it work
> > the mid delt less. If you're trying to work delts, I don't see the
> > point any than possibly using more weight.

> thats it more wieght

Yea, good for the ego and all..

Jake
March 25th 04, 06:17 PM
(Keith Hobman) wrote in message >...
> In article >, "Chris"
> > wrote:
>
> > Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
> > millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it felt good in my
> > shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was lifting then went back
> > to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so I decided to do them at 70 deg.
> > My question is has anybody done this and had good results with it here that
> > they wouldnt mind sharing? Any thoughts would be great..
> >
> Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military press.
> You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are basically
> changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight to be used
> because you use the chest as well as the delts.

Is there a noticeable difference between doing a shoulder press with
your back against a seat, and doing it seated but "free"? Thanks...

Jake

Jake
March 25th 04, 06:17 PM
(Keith Hobman) wrote in message >...
> In article >, "Chris"
> > wrote:
>
> > Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
> > millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it felt good in my
> > shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was lifting then went back
> > to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so I decided to do them at 70 deg.
> > My question is has anybody done this and had good results with it here that
> > they wouldnt mind sharing? Any thoughts would be great..
> >
> Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military press.
> You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are basically
> changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight to be used
> because you use the chest as well as the delts.

Is there a noticeable difference between doing a shoulder press with
your back against a seat, and doing it seated but "free"? Thanks...

Jake

Watson Davis
March 25th 04, 06:45 PM
bc > wrote in
:

> On Wed, 24 Mar 2004 20:47:22 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
> wrote:
>
>>In article >, "Chris"
> wrote:
>>
>>> Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight
>>> up) millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it felt
>>> good in my shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was
>>> lifting then went back to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so
>>> I decided to do them at 70 deg. My question is has anybody done this
>>> and had good results with it here that they wouldnt mind sharing?
>>> Any thoughts would be great..
>>>
>>Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military
>>press. You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are
>>basically changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight
>>to be used because you use the chest as well as the delts.
>
> Just today, I was doing dumbell military presses. Out of curiousity,
> I tried standing verses seated - but no backrest. I found that the
> standing allowed me to handle more weight, mostly because it was a
> little easier to get the dumbells up to my shoulders. I found that I
> had to watch for tension in my lower back on the standing ones though.

"Tuck" your pelvis and keep your abs tight. It's very easy (and bad) to go
hyperlordotic, arch your back too much, and let your abs go loose when
you're doing these. That can hurt your back... at least... it hurt mine.

Watson (the pencil neck) Davis

Watson Davis
March 25th 04, 06:45 PM
bc > wrote in
:

> On Wed, 24 Mar 2004 20:47:22 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
> wrote:
>
>>In article >, "Chris"
> wrote:
>>
>>> Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight
>>> up) millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it felt
>>> good in my shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was
>>> lifting then went back to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so
>>> I decided to do them at 70 deg. My question is has anybody done this
>>> and had good results with it here that they wouldnt mind sharing?
>>> Any thoughts would be great..
>>>
>>Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military
>>press. You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are
>>basically changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight
>>to be used because you use the chest as well as the delts.
>
> Just today, I was doing dumbell military presses. Out of curiousity,
> I tried standing verses seated - but no backrest. I found that the
> standing allowed me to handle more weight, mostly because it was a
> little easier to get the dumbells up to my shoulders. I found that I
> had to watch for tension in my lower back on the standing ones though.

"Tuck" your pelvis and keep your abs tight. It's very easy (and bad) to go
hyperlordotic, arch your back too much, and let your abs go loose when
you're doing these. That can hurt your back... at least... it hurt mine.

Watson (the pencil neck) Davis

Keith Hobman
March 25th 04, 07:24 PM
In article >,
(Jake) wrote:

> (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
>...
> > In article >, "Chris"
> > > wrote:
> >
> > > Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
> > > millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it felt
good in my
> > > shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was lifting then
went back
> > > to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so I decided to do them at
70 deg.
> > > My question is has anybody done this and had good results with it
here that
> > > they wouldnt mind sharing? Any thoughts would be great..
> > >
> > Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military press.
> > You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are basically
> > changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight to be used
> > because you use the chest as well as the delts.
>
> Is there a noticeable difference between doing a shoulder press with
> your back against a seat, and doing it seated but "free"? Thanks...
>
Yes, in terms of stabilizer activation. But if you are using a barbell you
have to be careful with heavy weights not to jeapardize the back. Keep the
abs tight.

--
Dawn's cold kiss calls me
Forth I creep, blindly stumbling
Joy: Morning workouts.
Hugh Beyer's 'Haiku On Returning To Weights'

Keith Hobman
March 25th 04, 07:24 PM
In article >,
(Jake) wrote:

> (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
>...
> > In article >, "Chris"
> > > wrote:
> >
> > > Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
> > > millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it felt
good in my
> > > shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was lifting then
went back
> > > to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so I decided to do them at
70 deg.
> > > My question is has anybody done this and had good results with it
here that
> > > they wouldnt mind sharing? Any thoughts would be great..
> > >
> > Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military press.
> > You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are basically
> > changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight to be used
> > because you use the chest as well as the delts.
>
> Is there a noticeable difference between doing a shoulder press with
> your back against a seat, and doing it seated but "free"? Thanks...
>
Yes, in terms of stabilizer activation. But if you are using a barbell you
have to be careful with heavy weights not to jeapardize the back. Keep the
abs tight.

--
Dawn's cold kiss calls me
Forth I creep, blindly stumbling
Joy: Morning workouts.
Hugh Beyer's 'Haiku On Returning To Weights'

Jake
March 26th 04, 02:46 AM
(Keith Hobman) wrote in message >...
> In article >,
> (Jake) wrote:
>
> > (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
> >...
> > > In article >, "Chris"
> > > > wrote:
> > >
> > > > Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
> > > > millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it felt
> good in my
> > > > shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was lifting then
> went back
> > > > to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so I decided to do them at
> 70 deg.
> > > > My question is has anybody done this and had good results with it
> here that
> > > > they wouldnt mind sharing? Any thoughts would be great..
> > > >
> > > Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military press.
> > > You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are basically
> > > changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight to be used
> > > because you use the chest as well as the delts.
> >
> > Is there a noticeable difference between doing a shoulder press with
> > your back against a seat, and doing it seated but "free"? Thanks...
> >
> Yes, in terms of stabilizer activation. But if you are using a barbell you
> have to be careful with heavy weights not to jeapardize the back. Keep the
> abs tight.


But which move would jeopardize the back, having my back against a
seat or not? I feel a bit more stable (and confident that my back is
straight) when it is against a seat, but I have no idea whether that
is a good thing or a bad thing.

thanks in advance

Jake
March 26th 04, 02:46 AM
(Keith Hobman) wrote in message >...
> In article >,
> (Jake) wrote:
>
> > (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
> >...
> > > In article >, "Chris"
> > > > wrote:
> > >
> > > > Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
> > > > millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it felt
> good in my
> > > > shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was lifting then
> went back
> > > > to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so I decided to do them at
> 70 deg.
> > > > My question is has anybody done this and had good results with it
> here that
> > > > they wouldnt mind sharing? Any thoughts would be great..
> > > >
> > > Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military press.
> > > You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are basically
> > > changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight to be used
> > > because you use the chest as well as the delts.
> >
> > Is there a noticeable difference between doing a shoulder press with
> > your back against a seat, and doing it seated but "free"? Thanks...
> >
> Yes, in terms of stabilizer activation. But if you are using a barbell you
> have to be careful with heavy weights not to jeapardize the back. Keep the
> abs tight.


But which move would jeopardize the back, having my back against a
seat or not? I feel a bit more stable (and confident that my back is
straight) when it is against a seat, but I have no idea whether that
is a good thing or a bad thing.

thanks in advance

Wayne S. Hill
March 26th 04, 03:03 AM
Jake wrote:

> But which move would jeopardize the back, having my back
> against a seat or not? I feel a bit more stable (and
> confident that my back is straight) when it is against a
> seat, but I have no idea whether that is a good thing or a
> bad thing.

That question has been discussed here before and is not trivially
answered. If you can control the motion (because you need to
avoid hyperextending your back), I think a standing shoulder press
is preferable. If you're a klutz, you should sit down and make
sure you keep your back against the seat.

--
-Wayne

Wayne S. Hill
March 26th 04, 03:03 AM
Jake wrote:

> But which move would jeopardize the back, having my back
> against a seat or not? I feel a bit more stable (and
> confident that my back is straight) when it is against a
> seat, but I have no idea whether that is a good thing or a
> bad thing.

That question has been discussed here before and is not trivially
answered. If you can control the motion (because you need to
avoid hyperextending your back), I think a standing shoulder press
is preferable. If you're a klutz, you should sit down and make
sure you keep your back against the seat.

--
-Wayne

Keith Hobman
March 26th 04, 02:05 PM
In article >,
(Jake) wrote:

> (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
>...
> > In article >,
> > (Jake) wrote:
> >
> > > (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
> > >...
> > > > In article >, "Chris"
> > > > > wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
> > > > > millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it felt
> > good in my
> > > > > shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was lifting then
> > went back
> > > > > to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so I decided to do them at
> > 70 deg.
> > > > > My question is has anybody done this and had good results with it
> > here that
> > > > > they wouldnt mind sharing? Any thoughts would be great..
> > > > >
> > > > Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military press.
> > > > You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are basically
> > > > changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight to be used
> > > > because you use the chest as well as the delts.
> > >
> > > Is there a noticeable difference between doing a shoulder press with
> > > your back against a seat, and doing it seated but "free"? Thanks...
> > >
> > Yes, in terms of stabilizer activation. But if you are using a barbell you
> > have to be careful with heavy weights not to jeapardize the back. Keep the
> > abs tight.
>
>
> But which move would jeopardize the back, having my back against a
> seat or not? I feel a bit more stable (and confident that my back is
> straight) when it is against a seat, but I have no idea whether that
> is a good thing or a bad thing.

Your back against a support jeopardizes your shoulders. No support - the
lower back if you lean back. Personally I don't believe in supports - I
lift to get strong. But that is based more on personality than
practicality. There is nothing wrong with using a seated position. So use
whichever you like or try doing both.

An easy way around the back issue is to use dumbbells.

--
Dawn's cold kiss calls me
Forth I creep, blindly stumbling
Joy: Morning workouts.
Hugh Beyer's 'Haiku On Returning To Weights'

Keith Hobman
March 26th 04, 02:05 PM
In article >,
(Jake) wrote:

> (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
>...
> > In article >,
> > (Jake) wrote:
> >
> > > (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
> > >...
> > > > In article >, "Chris"
> > > > > wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
> > > > > millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it felt
> > good in my
> > > > > shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was lifting then
> > went back
> > > > > to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so I decided to do them at
> > 70 deg.
> > > > > My question is has anybody done this and had good results with it
> > here that
> > > > > they wouldnt mind sharing? Any thoughts would be great..
> > > > >
> > > > Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military press.
> > > > You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are basically
> > > > changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight to be used
> > > > because you use the chest as well as the delts.
> > >
> > > Is there a noticeable difference between doing a shoulder press with
> > > your back against a seat, and doing it seated but "free"? Thanks...
> > >
> > Yes, in terms of stabilizer activation. But if you are using a barbell you
> > have to be careful with heavy weights not to jeapardize the back. Keep the
> > abs tight.
>
>
> But which move would jeopardize the back, having my back against a
> seat or not? I feel a bit more stable (and confident that my back is
> straight) when it is against a seat, but I have no idea whether that
> is a good thing or a bad thing.

Your back against a support jeopardizes your shoulders. No support - the
lower back if you lean back. Personally I don't believe in supports - I
lift to get strong. But that is based more on personality than
practicality. There is nothing wrong with using a seated position. So use
whichever you like or try doing both.

An easy way around the back issue is to use dumbbells.

--
Dawn's cold kiss calls me
Forth I creep, blindly stumbling
Joy: Morning workouts.
Hugh Beyer's 'Haiku On Returning To Weights'

AlphaOmega2004
March 26th 04, 03:07 PM
"Jake" > wrote in message
om...
> (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
>...
> > In article >,
> > (Jake) wrote:
> >
> > > (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
> > >...
> > > > In article >,
"Chris"
> > > > > wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight
up)
> > > > > millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it felt
> > good in my
> > > > > shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was lifting then
> > went back
> > > > > to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so I decided to do them
at
> > 70 deg.
> > > > > My question is has anybody done this and had good results with it
> > here that
> > > > > they wouldnt mind sharing? Any thoughts would be great..
> > > > >
> > > > Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military
press.
> > > > You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are basically
> > > > changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight to be
used
> > > > because you use the chest as well as the delts.
> > >
> > > Is there a noticeable difference between doing a shoulder press with
> > > your back against a seat, and doing it seated but "free"? Thanks...
> > >
> > Yes, in terms of stabilizer activation. But if you are using a barbell
you
> > have to be careful with heavy weights not to jeapardize the back. Keep
the
> > abs tight.
>
>
> But which move would jeopardize the back, having my back against a
> seat or not? I feel a bit more stable (and confident that my back is
> straight) when it is against a seat, but I have no idea whether that
> is a good thing or a bad thing.

Noting first that *any* exercise can be bad for you if done improperly and
most exercises are good for you if done properly...

Seated presses (IMHO) are one of the worst exercises (OOTBE) one can do
because of the postion of the lumbar disc WRT each other, the relative
static nature of that position (unlike the squat etc.) and the loading
vectors on them.
Try the standing version - the real military press.

AFA your question, having your back against the seatback could result in
your *not* keeping your abs/ta tight - may lead to relative relaxation of
your torso -which would contribute to potential injury scenarios.


>
> thanks in advance

AlphaOmega2004
March 26th 04, 03:07 PM
"Jake" > wrote in message
om...
> (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
>...
> > In article >,
> > (Jake) wrote:
> >
> > > (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
> > >...
> > > > In article >,
"Chris"
> > > > > wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight
up)
> > > > > millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it felt
> > good in my
> > > > > shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was lifting then
> > went back
> > > > > to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so I decided to do them
at
> > 70 deg.
> > > > > My question is has anybody done this and had good results with it
> > here that
> > > > > they wouldnt mind sharing? Any thoughts would be great..
> > > > >
> > > > Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military
press.
> > > > You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are basically
> > > > changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight to be
used
> > > > because you use the chest as well as the delts.
> > >
> > > Is there a noticeable difference between doing a shoulder press with
> > > your back against a seat, and doing it seated but "free"? Thanks...
> > >
> > Yes, in terms of stabilizer activation. But if you are using a barbell
you
> > have to be careful with heavy weights not to jeapardize the back. Keep
the
> > abs tight.
>
>
> But which move would jeopardize the back, having my back against a
> seat or not? I feel a bit more stable (and confident that my back is
> straight) when it is against a seat, but I have no idea whether that
> is a good thing or a bad thing.

Noting first that *any* exercise can be bad for you if done improperly and
most exercises are good for you if done properly...

Seated presses (IMHO) are one of the worst exercises (OOTBE) one can do
because of the postion of the lumbar disc WRT each other, the relative
static nature of that position (unlike the squat etc.) and the loading
vectors on them.
Try the standing version - the real military press.

AFA your question, having your back against the seatback could result in
your *not* keeping your abs/ta tight - may lead to relative relaxation of
your torso -which would contribute to potential injury scenarios.


>
> thanks in advance

John HUDSON
March 26th 04, 03:08 PM
On Fri, 26 Mar 2004 08:05:29 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
wrote:

>In article >,
(Jake) wrote:
>
>> (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
>...
>> > In article >,
>> > (Jake) wrote:
>> >
>> > > (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
>> > >...
>> > > > In article >, "Chris"
>> > > > > wrote:
>> > > >
>> > > > > Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
>> > > > > millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it felt
>> > good in my
>> > > > > shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was lifting then
>> > went back
>> > > > > to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so I decided to do them at
>> > 70 deg.
>> > > > > My question is has anybody done this and had good results with it
>> > here that
>> > > > > they wouldnt mind sharing? Any thoughts would be great..
>> > > > >
>> > > > Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military press.
>> > > > You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are basically
>> > > > changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight to be used
>> > > > because you use the chest as well as the delts.
>> > >
>> > > Is there a noticeable difference between doing a shoulder press with
>> > > your back against a seat, and doing it seated but "free"? Thanks...
>> > >
>> > Yes, in terms of stabilizer activation. But if you are using a barbell you
>> > have to be careful with heavy weights not to jeapardize the back. Keep the
>> > abs tight.
>>
>>
>> But which move would jeopardize the back, having my back against a
>> seat or not? I feel a bit more stable (and confident that my back is
>> straight) when it is against a seat, but I have no idea whether that
>> is a good thing or a bad thing.
>
>Your back against a support jeopardizes your shoulders. No support - the
>lower back if you lean back. Personally I don't believe in supports - I
>lift to get strong. But that is based more on personality than
>practicality. There is nothing wrong with using a seated position. So use
>whichever you like or try doing both.
>
>An easy way around the back issue is to use dumbbells.

I like the standing military press and did them exclusively while I
was in the service, particularly doing circuits. However, I now lift
heavier seated press, without risk to my back (which used to be a
problem), and I'm not tempted to cheat by using my legs to help
'throw' the weight up.

Have a great week-end - I intend to. The Six Nations 'clincher' for
the championship, against France in Paris. It should be a 'cracker'
and it's anyone's guess as to who will win!!

TFIF!! ;o)

John HUDSON
March 26th 04, 03:08 PM
On Fri, 26 Mar 2004 08:05:29 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
wrote:

>In article >,
(Jake) wrote:
>
>> (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
>...
>> > In article >,
>> > (Jake) wrote:
>> >
>> > > (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
>> > >...
>> > > > In article >, "Chris"
>> > > > > wrote:
>> > > >
>> > > > > Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight up)
>> > > > > millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it felt
>> > good in my
>> > > > > shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was lifting then
>> > went back
>> > > > > to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so I decided to do them at
>> > 70 deg.
>> > > > > My question is has anybody done this and had good results with it
>> > here that
>> > > > > they wouldnt mind sharing? Any thoughts would be great..
>> > > > >
>> > > > Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military press.
>> > > > You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are basically
>> > > > changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight to be used
>> > > > because you use the chest as well as the delts.
>> > >
>> > > Is there a noticeable difference between doing a shoulder press with
>> > > your back against a seat, and doing it seated but "free"? Thanks...
>> > >
>> > Yes, in terms of stabilizer activation. But if you are using a barbell you
>> > have to be careful with heavy weights not to jeapardize the back. Keep the
>> > abs tight.
>>
>>
>> But which move would jeopardize the back, having my back against a
>> seat or not? I feel a bit more stable (and confident that my back is
>> straight) when it is against a seat, but I have no idea whether that
>> is a good thing or a bad thing.
>
>Your back against a support jeopardizes your shoulders. No support - the
>lower back if you lean back. Personally I don't believe in supports - I
>lift to get strong. But that is based more on personality than
>practicality. There is nothing wrong with using a seated position. So use
>whichever you like or try doing both.
>
>An easy way around the back issue is to use dumbbells.

I like the standing military press and did them exclusively while I
was in the service, particularly doing circuits. However, I now lift
heavier seated press, without risk to my back (which used to be a
problem), and I'm not tempted to cheat by using my legs to help
'throw' the weight up.

Have a great week-end - I intend to. The Six Nations 'clincher' for
the championship, against France in Paris. It should be a 'cracker'
and it's anyone's guess as to who will win!!

TFIF!! ;o)

AlphaOmega2004
March 26th 04, 03:12 PM
"John HUDSON" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri, 26 Mar 2004 08:05:29 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
> wrote:
>
> >In article >,
> (Jake) wrote:
> >
> >> (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
> >...
> >> > In article >,
> >> > (Jake) wrote:
> >> >
> >> > > (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
> >> > >...
> >> > > > In article >,
"Chris"
> >> > > > > wrote:
> >> > > >
> >> > > > > Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting
straight up)
> >> > > > > millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it
felt
> >> > good in my
> >> > > > > shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was lifting
then
> >> > went back
> >> > > > > to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so I decided to do
them at
> >> > 70 deg.
> >> > > > > My question is has anybody done this and had good results with
it
> >> > here that
> >> > > > > they wouldnt mind sharing? Any thoughts would be great..
> >> > > > >
> >> > > > Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military
press.
> >> > > > You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are
basically
> >> > > > changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight to be
used
> >> > > > because you use the chest as well as the delts.
> >> > >
> >> > > Is there a noticeable difference between doing a shoulder press
with
> >> > > your back against a seat, and doing it seated but "free"?
Thanks...
> >> > >
> >> > Yes, in terms of stabilizer activation. But if you are using a
barbell you
> >> > have to be careful with heavy weights not to jeapardize the back.
Keep the
> >> > abs tight.
> >>
> >>
> >> But which move would jeopardize the back, having my back against a
> >> seat or not? I feel a bit more stable (and confident that my back is
> >> straight) when it is against a seat, but I have no idea whether that
> >> is a good thing or a bad thing.
> >
> >Your back against a support jeopardizes your shoulders. No support - the
> >lower back if you lean back. Personally I don't believe in supports - I
> >lift to get strong. But that is based more on personality than
> >practicality. There is nothing wrong with using a seated position. So use
> >whichever you like or try doing both.
> >
> >An easy way around the back issue is to use dumbbells.
>
> I like the standing military press and did them exclusively while I
> was in the service, particularly doing circuits. However, I now lift
> heavier seated press, without risk to my back (which used to be a
> problem), and I'm not tempted to cheat by using my legs to help
> 'throw' the weight up.

You can avoid that temptation if your ego is in check. See my other
response on the relative risk to the lumbar area.

>
> Have a great week-end - I intend to. The Six Nations 'clincher' for
> the championship, against France in Paris. It should be a 'cracker'
> and it's anyone's guess as to who will win!!
>
> TFIF!! ;o)

AlphaOmega2004
March 26th 04, 03:12 PM
"John HUDSON" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri, 26 Mar 2004 08:05:29 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
> wrote:
>
> >In article >,
> (Jake) wrote:
> >
> >> (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
> >...
> >> > In article >,
> >> > (Jake) wrote:
> >> >
> >> > > (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
> >> > >...
> >> > > > In article >,
"Chris"
> >> > > > > wrote:
> >> > > >
> >> > > > > Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting
straight up)
> >> > > > > millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it
felt
> >> > good in my
> >> > > > > shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was lifting
then
> >> > went back
> >> > > > > to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so I decided to do
them at
> >> > 70 deg.
> >> > > > > My question is has anybody done this and had good results with
it
> >> > here that
> >> > > > > they wouldnt mind sharing? Any thoughts would be great..
> >> > > > >
> >> > > > Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military
press.
> >> > > > You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are
basically
> >> > > > changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight to be
used
> >> > > > because you use the chest as well as the delts.
> >> > >
> >> > > Is there a noticeable difference between doing a shoulder press
with
> >> > > your back against a seat, and doing it seated but "free"?
Thanks...
> >> > >
> >> > Yes, in terms of stabilizer activation. But if you are using a
barbell you
> >> > have to be careful with heavy weights not to jeapardize the back.
Keep the
> >> > abs tight.
> >>
> >>
> >> But which move would jeopardize the back, having my back against a
> >> seat or not? I feel a bit more stable (and confident that my back is
> >> straight) when it is against a seat, but I have no idea whether that
> >> is a good thing or a bad thing.
> >
> >Your back against a support jeopardizes your shoulders. No support - the
> >lower back if you lean back. Personally I don't believe in supports - I
> >lift to get strong. But that is based more on personality than
> >practicality. There is nothing wrong with using a seated position. So use
> >whichever you like or try doing both.
> >
> >An easy way around the back issue is to use dumbbells.
>
> I like the standing military press and did them exclusively while I
> was in the service, particularly doing circuits. However, I now lift
> heavier seated press, without risk to my back (which used to be a
> problem), and I'm not tempted to cheat by using my legs to help
> 'throw' the weight up.

You can avoid that temptation if your ego is in check. See my other
response on the relative risk to the lumbar area.

>
> Have a great week-end - I intend to. The Six Nations 'clincher' for
> the championship, against France in Paris. It should be a 'cracker'
> and it's anyone's guess as to who will win!!
>
> TFIF!! ;o)

John HUDSON
March 26th 04, 04:13 PM
On Fri, 26 Mar 2004 15:12:06 GMT, "AlphaOmega2004"
> wrote:

>
>"John HUDSON" > wrote in message
...
>> On Fri, 26 Mar 2004 08:05:29 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
>> wrote:
>>
>> >In article >,
>> (Jake) wrote:
>> >
>> >> (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
>> >...
>> >> > In article >,
>> >> > (Jake) wrote:
>> >> >
>> >> > > (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
>> >> > >...
>> >> > > > In article >,
>"Chris"
>> >> > > > > wrote:
>> >> > > >
>> >> > > > > Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting
>straight up)
>> >> > > > > millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it
>felt
>> >> > good in my
>> >> > > > > shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was lifting
>then
>> >> > went back
>> >> > > > > to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so I decided to do
>them at
>> >> > 70 deg.
>> >> > > > > My question is has anybody done this and had good results with
>it
>> >> > here that
>> >> > > > > they wouldnt mind sharing? Any thoughts would be great..
>> >> > > > >
>> >> > > > Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military
>press.
>> >> > > > You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are
>basically
>> >> > > > changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight to be
>used
>> >> > > > because you use the chest as well as the delts.
>> >> > >
>> >> > > Is there a noticeable difference between doing a shoulder press
>with
>> >> > > your back against a seat, and doing it seated but "free"?
>Thanks...
>> >> > >
>> >> > Yes, in terms of stabilizer activation. But if you are using a
>barbell you
>> >> > have to be careful with heavy weights not to jeapardize the back.
>Keep the
>> >> > abs tight.
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> But which move would jeopardize the back, having my back against a
>> >> seat or not? I feel a bit more stable (and confident that my back is
>> >> straight) when it is against a seat, but I have no idea whether that
>> >> is a good thing or a bad thing.
>> >
>> >Your back against a support jeopardizes your shoulders. No support - the
>> >lower back if you lean back. Personally I don't believe in supports - I
>> >lift to get strong. But that is based more on personality than
>> >practicality. There is nothing wrong with using a seated position. So use
>> >whichever you like or try doing both.
>> >
>> >An easy way around the back issue is to use dumbbells.
>>
>> I like the standing military press and did them exclusively while I
>> was in the service, particularly doing circuits. However, I now lift
>> heavier seated press, without risk to my back (which used to be a
>> problem), and I'm not tempted to cheat by using my legs to help
>> 'throw' the weight up.
>
>You can avoid that temptation if your ego is in check.

Now how likely is that Prof?!! ;o)

Have a great week-end - I intend to!!

TFIF!!

John HUDSON
March 26th 04, 04:13 PM
On Fri, 26 Mar 2004 15:12:06 GMT, "AlphaOmega2004"
> wrote:

>
>"John HUDSON" > wrote in message
...
>> On Fri, 26 Mar 2004 08:05:29 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
>> wrote:
>>
>> >In article >,
>> (Jake) wrote:
>> >
>> >> (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
>> >...
>> >> > In article >,
>> >> > (Jake) wrote:
>> >> >
>> >> > > (Keith Hobman) wrote in message
>> >> > >...
>> >> > > > In article >,
>"Chris"
>> >> > > > > wrote:
>> >> > > >
>> >> > > > > Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting
>straight up)
>> >> > > > > millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it
>felt
>> >> > good in my
>> >> > > > > shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was lifting
>then
>> >> > went back
>> >> > > > > to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so I decided to do
>them at
>> >> > 70 deg.
>> >> > > > > My question is has anybody done this and had good results with
>it
>> >> > here that
>> >> > > > > they wouldnt mind sharing? Any thoughts would be great..
>> >> > > > >
>> >> > > > Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military
>press.
>> >> > > > You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are
>basically
>> >> > > > changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight to be
>used
>> >> > > > because you use the chest as well as the delts.
>> >> > >
>> >> > > Is there a noticeable difference between doing a shoulder press
>with
>> >> > > your back against a seat, and doing it seated but "free"?
>Thanks...
>> >> > >
>> >> > Yes, in terms of stabilizer activation. But if you are using a
>barbell you
>> >> > have to be careful with heavy weights not to jeapardize the back.
>Keep the
>> >> > abs tight.
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> But which move would jeopardize the back, having my back against a
>> >> seat or not? I feel a bit more stable (and confident that my back is
>> >> straight) when it is against a seat, but I have no idea whether that
>> >> is a good thing or a bad thing.
>> >
>> >Your back against a support jeopardizes your shoulders. No support - the
>> >lower back if you lean back. Personally I don't believe in supports - I
>> >lift to get strong. But that is based more on personality than
>> >practicality. There is nothing wrong with using a seated position. So use
>> >whichever you like or try doing both.
>> >
>> >An easy way around the back issue is to use dumbbells.
>>
>> I like the standing military press and did them exclusively while I
>> was in the service, particularly doing circuits. However, I now lift
>> heavier seated press, without risk to my back (which used to be a
>> problem), and I'm not tempted to cheat by using my legs to help
>> 'throw' the weight up.
>
>You can avoid that temptation if your ego is in check.

Now how likely is that Prof?!! ;o)

Have a great week-end - I intend to!!

TFIF!!

billydee
March 26th 04, 05:39 PM
"Wayne S. Hill" > wrote in message >...
> Jake wrote:
>
> > But which move would jeopardize the back, having my back
> > against a seat or not? I feel a bit more stable (and
> > confident that my back is straight) when it is against a
> > seat, but I have no idea whether that is a good thing or a
> > bad thing.
>
> That question has been discussed here before and is not trivially
> answered. If you can control the motion (because you need to
> avoid hyperextending your back), I think a standing shoulder press
> is preferable. If you're a klutz, you should sit down and make
> sure you keep your back against the seat.

Regarding back hyperextention...is it to be avoided at all costs or is
there some wiggle room there? I've been doing mine standing for a
while and occasionally when the weight gets heavier I'll have to
engage the low back a bit to get the final part of the lift in. Would
I be better off stopping short of that point? I don't seem to have
suffered any ill effects from it, but don't want to be reinforcing bad
form. I feel like I stress my low back way more doing conventional
deadlifts than standing MP.

billydee
March 26th 04, 05:39 PM
"Wayne S. Hill" > wrote in message >...
> Jake wrote:
>
> > But which move would jeopardize the back, having my back
> > against a seat or not? I feel a bit more stable (and
> > confident that my back is straight) when it is against a
> > seat, but I have no idea whether that is a good thing or a
> > bad thing.
>
> That question has been discussed here before and is not trivially
> answered. If you can control the motion (because you need to
> avoid hyperextending your back), I think a standing shoulder press
> is preferable. If you're a klutz, you should sit down and make
> sure you keep your back against the seat.

Regarding back hyperextention...is it to be avoided at all costs or is
there some wiggle room there? I've been doing mine standing for a
while and occasionally when the weight gets heavier I'll have to
engage the low back a bit to get the final part of the lift in. Would
I be better off stopping short of that point? I don't seem to have
suffered any ill effects from it, but don't want to be reinforcing bad
form. I feel like I stress my low back way more doing conventional
deadlifts than standing MP.

bc
March 26th 04, 05:43 PM
Watson Davis > wrote in message >...
> bc > wrote in
> :
>
> > On Wed, 24 Mar 2004 20:47:22 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
> > wrote:
> >
> >>In article >, "Chris"
> > wrote:
> >>
> >>> Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight
> >>> up) millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it felt
> >>> good in my shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was
> >>> lifting then went back to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so
> >>> I decided to do them at 70 deg. My question is has anybody done this
> >>> and had good results with it here that they wouldnt mind sharing?
> >>> Any thoughts would be great..
> >>>
> >>Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military
> >>press. You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are
> >>basically changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight
> >>to be used because you use the chest as well as the delts.
> >
> > Just today, I was doing dumbell military presses. Out of curiousity,
> > I tried standing verses seated - but no backrest. I found that the
> > standing allowed me to handle more weight, mostly because it was a
> > little easier to get the dumbells up to my shoulders. I found that I
> > had to watch for tension in my lower back on the standing ones though.
>
> "Tuck" your pelvis and keep your abs tight. It's very easy (and bad) to go
> hyperlordotic, arch your back too much, and let your abs go loose when
> you're doing these. That can hurt your back... at least... it hurt mine.
>
> Watson (the pencil neck) Davis

Yup, that pretty much describes what was happening. I'll keep that
pelvis well tucked.

It would seem that standing is a better way to make many lifts work
those supporting muscles more than a seated version does. For
example, I like to do curls standing, but with strict attention to
non-cheating form. I like the tension in my torso and glutes while
supporting the weight. Seems obvious I guess.

- bc

bc
March 26th 04, 05:43 PM
Watson Davis > wrote in message >...
> bc > wrote in
> :
>
> > On Wed, 24 Mar 2004 20:47:22 -0600, (Keith Hobman)
> > wrote:
> >
> >>In article >, "Chris"
> > wrote:
> >>
> >>> Today i tried something new insted of a 90 degree(sitting straight
> >>> up) millitary press I set the bench at about 70 degree's and it felt
> >>> good in my shoulders I had my partner check the muscle as I was
> >>> lifting then went back to a 90 deg angle and had the same result so
> >>> I decided to do them at 70 deg. My question is has anybody done this
> >>> and had good results with it here that they wouldnt mind sharing?
> >>> Any thoughts would be great..
> >>>
> >>Not to answer your question, but you aren't performing a military
> >>press. You are doing a back-supported seated press. And you are
> >>basically changing it into an incline press, which allows more weight
> >>to be used because you use the chest as well as the delts.
> >
> > Just today, I was doing dumbell military presses. Out of curiousity,
> > I tried standing verses seated - but no backrest. I found that the
> > standing allowed me to handle more weight, mostly because it was a
> > little easier to get the dumbells up to my shoulders. I found that I
> > had to watch for tension in my lower back on the standing ones though.
>
> "Tuck" your pelvis and keep your abs tight. It's very easy (and bad) to go
> hyperlordotic, arch your back too much, and let your abs go loose when
> you're doing these. That can hurt your back... at least... it hurt mine.
>
> Watson (the pencil neck) Davis

Yup, that pretty much describes what was happening. I'll keep that
pelvis well tucked.

It would seem that standing is a better way to make many lifts work
those supporting muscles more than a seated version does. For
example, I like to do curls standing, but with strict attention to
non-cheating form. I like the tension in my torso and glutes while
supporting the weight. Seems obvious I guess.

- bc

John HUDSON
March 26th 04, 09:57 PM
On Fri, 26 Mar 2004 19:15:33 GMT, DZ > wrote:

>John HUDSON > wrote:
>>> You can avoid that temptation if your ego is in check.
>>
>> Now how likely is that Prof?!! ;o)
>>
>> Have a great week-end - I intend to!!
>>
>> TFIF!!
>
>Careful with the Scotch John!

I'm not a great whisky drinker, although I do like a to sip a good
single malt on occasions.

I much prefer a good brandy or Armagnac following dinner, and I enjoy
a long gin and tonic with ice and a slice of lemon as a pre-prandial.
However, wine is my favourite 'tipple' as I enjoy the whole ethos of
keeping a good cellar.

My current favourite to drink at anytime, as the Spring and Summer
approaches, is a light, slightly sparkling Rose from South Africa.

However, thank you for the warning! ;o)

TFIF!!

John HUDSON
March 26th 04, 09:57 PM
On Fri, 26 Mar 2004 19:15:33 GMT, DZ > wrote:

>John HUDSON > wrote:
>>> You can avoid that temptation if your ego is in check.
>>
>> Now how likely is that Prof?!! ;o)
>>
>> Have a great week-end - I intend to!!
>>
>> TFIF!!
>
>Careful with the Scotch John!

I'm not a great whisky drinker, although I do like a to sip a good
single malt on occasions.

I much prefer a good brandy or Armagnac following dinner, and I enjoy
a long gin and tonic with ice and a slice of lemon as a pre-prandial.
However, wine is my favourite 'tipple' as I enjoy the whole ethos of
keeping a good cellar.

My current favourite to drink at anytime, as the Spring and Summer
approaches, is a light, slightly sparkling Rose from South Africa.

However, thank you for the warning! ;o)

TFIF!!

Wayne S. Hill
March 26th 04, 10:56 PM
billydee wrote:

> Regarding back hyperextention...is it to be avoided at all
> costs or is there some wiggle room there? I've been doing
> mine standing for a while and occasionally when the weight
> gets heavier I'll have to engage the low back a bit to get
> the final part of the lift in. Would I be better off
> stopping short of that point? I don't seem to have suffered
> any ill effects from it, but don't want to be reinforcing
> bad form. I feel like I stress my low back way more doing
> conventional deadlifts than standing MP.

There's extension, and there's hyperextension. If you end up
arching your back excessively to turn a press into more of a
benching motion, you're cheating, could injure yourself, and
should back off on the weight. Alternatively, you could switch
to a push press at this point, using a knee dip to get the bar
moving and then press it out with a normal spine position.

--
-Wayne

Wayne S. Hill
March 26th 04, 10:56 PM
billydee wrote:

> Regarding back hyperextention...is it to be avoided at all
> costs or is there some wiggle room there? I've been doing
> mine standing for a while and occasionally when the weight
> gets heavier I'll have to engage the low back a bit to get
> the final part of the lift in. Would I be better off
> stopping short of that point? I don't seem to have suffered
> any ill effects from it, but don't want to be reinforcing
> bad form. I feel like I stress my low back way more doing
> conventional deadlifts than standing MP.

There's extension, and there's hyperextension. If you end up
arching your back excessively to turn a press into more of a
benching motion, you're cheating, could injure yourself, and
should back off on the weight. Alternatively, you could switch
to a push press at this point, using a knee dip to get the bar
moving and then press it out with a normal spine position.

--
-Wayne