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Keano
May 5th 04, 04:58 PM
http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=healthNews&storyID=5033575&section=news

Study: Low-Fat May Not Be Best for Heart

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A relatively high amount of fat in the
diet may be a boon to a healthy person's cholesterol levels, a small
study suggests. On the other hand, limiting fat intake too much could
have the opposite effect.

Researchers at the State University of New York at Buffalo found that
when 11 healthy but sedentary adults followed a very low-fat diet (19
percent of calories from fat) for three weeks, they saw a drop in
their HDL cholesterol -- the "good" cholesterol believed to protect
against heart disease.

In contrast, three weeks on a diet that provided 50 percent of
calories from fat boosted participants' HDL levels, according to
findings published in the Journal of the American College of
Nutrition.

To circulate in the blood, cholesterol must be attached to a protein,
forming a complex called a lipoprotein. HDL, or high-density
lipoprotein, molecules carry cholesterol away from the arteries and to
the liver to be cleared from the body. Experts believe that an HDL
level of 60 or more helps lower the risk of heart disease, while a
level lower than 40 raises the risk.

The new findings suggest that adequate fat intake can help ward off
heart disease by raising HDL.

"That isn't to say we think everyone should be on a 50-percent fat
diet," study co-author Dr. David R. Pendergast told Reuters Health.

But, he said, the findings do indicate that moderation, and not tight
restriction, is the way to go. According to Pendergast, that means
getting about 30 to 35 percent of calories from fat -- at or slightly
more than the level health officials currently recommend.

But he also stressed the importance of calorie balance, which means
eating only enough to meet the body's calorie expenditure. Fat has
more calories per gram than either carbohydrates or protein, and if a
person takes in more calories as a result of eating more fat, weight
gain may follow.

While saturated fat is blamed for raising "bad" LDL cholesterol
levels, Pendergast said it may in fact be the combination of lots of
fat and too many calories that makes for unhealthy cholesterol
profiles.

In his team's study, the high-fat diet -- rich in foods such as red
meat and olive oil -- provided roughly the same number of daily
calories as participants' regular diets, which contained about 30
percent of calories from fat.

The 19-percent low-fat diet had fewer calories, and men and women in
the study lost a small amount of weight while following it. Their HDL
levels, however, were significantly lower on this diet than on the
high-fat one-an average of 54 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), versus
63 mg/dL, Pendergast and his colleagues found.

What's more, the high-fat diet did not boost LDL cholesterol beyond
the levels participants had on their regular diets.

Although the men and women followed each diet for only three weeks,
Pendergast said he does not think the cholesterol effects are
"transient."

He and his colleagues had previously conducted a similar study with
endurance runners, in which a very low fat intake had negative effects
on HDL cholesterol and on immune function. Pendergast said this
research suggests that both healthy, sedentary people and healthy
athletes are "probably not well served" by diets very low in fat.

Whether high- and low-fat diets have the same effects in obese
individuals or those with cardiovascular disease is not yet clear, he
noted.

As for why a high-fat, calorie-conscious diet might bump up HDL
levels, one theory is that dietary fat leads to higher levels of the
chief HDL transporter protein, ApoA1.

SOURCE: Journal of the American College of Nutrition, April 2004.

Lyle McDonald
May 5th 04, 06:58 PM
Study finds: we knew this at least 3-5 years ago so please keep up.

Lyle

Keano wrote:
>
> http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=healthNews&storyID=5033575&section=news
>
> Study: Low-Fat May Not Be Best for Heart
>
> NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A relatively high amount of fat in the
> diet may be a boon to a healthy person's cholesterol levels, a small
> study suggests. On the other hand, limiting fat intake too much could
> have the opposite effect.
>
> Researchers at the State University of New York at Buffalo found that
> when 11 healthy but sedentary adults followed a very low-fat diet (19
> percent of calories from fat) for three weeks, they saw a drop in
> their HDL cholesterol -- the "good" cholesterol believed to protect
> against heart disease.
>
> In contrast, three weeks on a diet that provided 50 percent of
> calories from fat boosted participants' HDL levels, according to
> findings published in the Journal of the American College of
> Nutrition.
>
> To circulate in the blood, cholesterol must be attached to a protein,
> forming a complex called a lipoprotein. HDL, or high-density
> lipoprotein, molecules carry cholesterol away from the arteries and to
> the liver to be cleared from the body. Experts believe that an HDL
> level of 60 or more helps lower the risk of heart disease, while a
> level lower than 40 raises the risk.
>
> The new findings suggest that adequate fat intake can help ward off
> heart disease by raising HDL.
>
> "That isn't to say we think everyone should be on a 50-percent fat
> diet," study co-author Dr. David R. Pendergast told Reuters Health.
>
> But, he said, the findings do indicate that moderation, and not tight
> restriction, is the way to go. According to Pendergast, that means
> getting about 30 to 35 percent of calories from fat -- at or slightly
> more than the level health officials currently recommend.
>
> But he also stressed the importance of calorie balance, which means
> eating only enough to meet the body's calorie expenditure. Fat has
> more calories per gram than either carbohydrates or protein, and if a
> person takes in more calories as a result of eating more fat, weight
> gain may follow.
>
> While saturated fat is blamed for raising "bad" LDL cholesterol
> levels, Pendergast said it may in fact be the combination of lots of
> fat and too many calories that makes for unhealthy cholesterol
> profiles.
>
> In his team's study, the high-fat diet -- rich in foods such as red
> meat and olive oil -- provided roughly the same number of daily
> calories as participants' regular diets, which contained about 30
> percent of calories from fat.
>
> The 19-percent low-fat diet had fewer calories, and men and women in
> the study lost a small amount of weight while following it. Their HDL
> levels, however, were significantly lower on this diet than on the
> high-fat one-an average of 54 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), versus
> 63 mg/dL, Pendergast and his colleagues found.
>
> What's more, the high-fat diet did not boost LDL cholesterol beyond
> the levels participants had on their regular diets.
>
> Although the men and women followed each diet for only three weeks,
> Pendergast said he does not think the cholesterol effects are
> "transient."
>
> He and his colleagues had previously conducted a similar study with
> endurance runners, in which a very low fat intake had negative effects
> on HDL cholesterol and on immune function. Pendergast said this
> research suggests that both healthy, sedentary people and healthy
> athletes are "probably not well served" by diets very low in fat.
>
> Whether high- and low-fat diets have the same effects in obese
> individuals or those with cardiovascular disease is not yet clear, he
> noted.
>
> As for why a high-fat, calorie-conscious diet might bump up HDL
> levels, one theory is that dietary fat leads to higher levels of the
> chief HDL transporter protein, ApoA1.
>
> SOURCE: Journal of the American College of Nutrition, April 2004.