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BALL/HEEL/BALL Is the Correct Way To Run (1997)



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 9th 04, 08:56 AM
Ozzie Gontang
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Posts: n/a
Default BALL/HEEL/BALL Is the Correct Way To Run (1997)

Some of the thinking and perspectives that reinforced my view on
landing midfoot or ball/heel.

Ozzie



BALL/HEEL/BALL Is the Correct Way To Run
Austin "Ozzie" Gontang, Ph.D.

Man the running animal at even slow running speed is meant to run
Ball/Heel/Ball!!!!! Heel running is based on a faulty premise and if
not faulty, then it is a faulty translation by those runners who hear
it and implement it...as they land on the back of the heel of the
shoe...which is way behind the actual heel of the foot. Run bare foot
to see what I mean.

Either start thinking for yourself about running injury free...or
minimal injuries...or injury prevention...and look at the way you land
on your feet...and look at the fact that almost all running shoes worn
by the mass of runners have very thick heels and soles and don't let
you feel where you land or how hard you land.

Please help me understand why very few people are willing to say that
the majority of runners should be landing ball/heel...as the three
authors below hold.

From: Applied Kinesiology by Clayne Jensen & Gordon Schultz 1977
McGraw Hill p. 290-291

Running mechanics vary from one person to another, and they vary in the
same person running at different speeds.

At a slow running speed, complete foot contact is used. The
foot-surface contact with each stride goes from the ball of the foot to
the heel and back to the ball (restful to calf muscles). As running
rate increases, the amount of foot contact becomes less, until finally
at full speed only the forward part of the foot contacts the surface.
The sprinter "runs on the toes." (Oz's view: Actually it is the front
of the ball of the foot just behind the toes)

Strength, Power and Muscular Endurance for Runners & Hurdlers by John
Jesse 1971, Athletic Press.

p. 56 As to long-distance events, most authorities are of the opinion
that the mechanical details are not important if the overall running
action is efficient and relaxed with emphasis being placed on
eliminating all bodily movements that will expend energy unnecessarily.
However, the same authorities appear to be in agreement as to certain
characteristics of style that lead to an optimum performance with
economy of effort: (a) shorter stride, (b) lower knee lift, (c)
ball-heel-ball-toe action of the foot, (d) lower and more relaxed arm
swing, (e) high kick up in the back providing it is natural, relaxed
movement, (f) general overall relaxed manner.



Ten Tips on Running Form" appeared in Run Fast by Hal Higdon, 1992
by Hal Higdon Communications, all rights reserved.


TEN TIPS ON RUNNING FORM

FRED WILT WAS A DISTANCE RUNNER on the 1948 and 1952 U.S. Olympic
teams and became famous for his legendary indoor mile encounters
at that time with Wisconsin's Don Gehrmann. After retiring from
the FBI, Wilt coached the women's running teams at Purdue
University. He edited the publication Track Technique and advised
various athletes, including 1964 Olympian Buddy Edelen, who once
held the world marathon record of 2:14:28. Wilt's tips on running
form follow:

1. Running form is a completely individual issue. Each athlete
differs from every other at least to a minute extent in height,
weight, bone structure, length and size of muscles, point of
muscle origin and insertion, strength, flexibility, posture and
personality, in addition to numerous other features. Therefore, no
two runners should ever use identical form, even though they all
adhere to basic mechanical principles.

2. It is a form error of the highest magnitude to run without
permitting the heel to touch and rest on the ground with each
stride, without reservation, in a ball-heel grounding action. This
is true at all running speeds, especially sprinting.

3. It is physically possible to land heel-first in running, but
this is quite incorrect and almost never seen, since it jars the
body excessively and can be done only at very slow running speeds.
Landing heel-first and "toe running" (refusing to permit the heels
to ground) are both incorrect.

4. Ideally, the position of the feet in running is one in which
the inner borders fall approximately along a straight line.
Athletes should run in a straight line, but not necessarily on
such a line. When one foot is placed directly in front of the
other, lateral (sideways) balance is impaired.

5. Runners in races longer than sprint distance wherein economy of
energy is the paramount consideration should use a natural stride:
not exaggerated, not long, not short, but of a length in keeping
with maximum economy of effort for the running speed required.

6. Both understriding and overstriding are faults. Each runner has
his own optimum stride length at any given speed, depending upon
leg length, muscular strength and flexibility.

7. At uniform top speed with zero acceleration, if the athlete was
running in a vacuum with no wind resistance, there would be no
body lean at all.

8. The hands should be carried in a relaxed, cupped position at
all running speeds. They should never be rigidly clenched in a
fist while running, since this produces tension, which causes
unnecessary fatigue.

9. The head should be aligned naturally with the trunk, and the
eyes should be focused a few meters ahead while running.

10. Usually the best solution to apparent form problems is many
repetitions of running short distances, such as 100 meters, at a
fast, though not exhausting pace.

"Ten Tips on Running Form" appeared in Run Fast by Hal Higdon,
Copyright 1992 by Hal Higdon Communications, all rights
reserved. Autographed copies of this book are available for $16.50
(includes shipping and handling) from Roadrunner Press, P.O. Box
1034, Michigan City, IN 46361-1034.


Here's a reference book for your running library that you will use for
years to come. If you want to purchase a copy of one of the books which
I still use as a guide to answering questions and understanding running
problems, send $15 which covers the price of the book and
shipping/handling.

The book is: Hidden Causes of Injury, Prevention And Correction, for
Running Athletes and Joggers by John Jesse, 1977.

Make out the $15 check or money order to:
IAM or Int'l Assoc. of Marathoners
c/o Ozzie Gontang
2903 29th Street
San Diego, CA 92104

Excerpt from the Intro:

"Three of the four hidden factors (of injury) - muscular imbalance,
postural faults, and foot faults - are so common among the general
population that it is doubtful whether any young athlete enters the
field of athletic competition without being affected to a lesser or
greater degree by one or more of them.

The writer (John Jesse) believes a more detailed and complete
discussion of these factors and of the methods of correcting them or
preventing their further development will enable the coach, trainer,
and athlete jto cope with them early in the young athlete's career. It
will enable the athlete to reduce to a minimum the number of roadblocks
and setbacks he(she) suffers during training and in pursuit of his(her)
goals.

The information presented here should be of great value to the several
million physical fitness joggers and runners in the population, because
the book is aimed at providing understandable answers to all injuries
that interrupt their progress toward attainment of an increased level
of cardiovascular fitness, or that interfere with the psychological
satisfactions obtained from engaging in such activities.

The human bodyh supports itself against gravity, segment upon segment,
relying on the muscles and ligaments that cross the joints, along with
postural reflexes, to maintain an erect position and proper body
alignment. Hence, there has to be a total or "holistic" approach to
prevention and to correction of the hidden factors mentioned above.
The reader must integrate his/her thinking to a total body concept."

John Jesse was a team mate at USC with Payton Jordon who was the US
Olympic head track and field coach in 1968. John wrote this book for
you and me, so that we could understand through popular language, and
with scientific and technical language kept to a minimum but using
diagrams, illustrations or short glossaries so we the laymen could
understand should we want to delve deeper.
  #2  
Old January 9th 04, 09:00 AM
Ozzie Gontang
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default BALL/HEEL/BALL Is the Correct Way To Run (1997)

Some thoughts of Miles Lakin and my response.

Oz

First compile of info building basis for Ball/Heel as correct way of running for running at any speed. Ozzie


Let the Thread begin on Ball/Heel as the corrrect way of running.

Either start thinking for yourself about running injury free...or minimal injuries...or injury prevention...and look at the way you land on your feet...and look at the fact that almost all running shoes worn by the mass of runners have very thick heels and soles and don't let you feel where you land or how hard you land.

Please help me understand why very few people are willing to say that the majority of runners should be landing ball/heel...as the three authors below hold.


From: Applied Kinesiology by Clayne Jensen & Gordon Schultz 1977 McGraw Hill

p. 290-291

Running mechanics vary from one person to another, and they vary in the same person running at different speeds.

At a slow running speed, complete foot contact is used. The foot-surface contact with each stride goes from the ball of the foot to the heel and back to the ball (restful to calf muscles). As running rate increases, the amount of foot contact becomes less, until finally at full speed only the forward part of the foot contacts the surface. The sprinter "runs on the toes." (Oz's view: Actually it is the front of the ball of the foot just behind the toes)

Strength, Power and Muscular Endurance for Runners & Hurdlers by John Jesse 1971, Athletic Press.

p. 56 As to long-distance events, most authorities are of the opinion that the mechanical details are not important if the overall running action is efficient and relaxed with emphasis being placed on eliminating all bodily movements that will expend energy unnecessarily. However, the same authorities appear to be in agreement as to certain characteristics of style that lead to an optimum performance with economy of effort: (a) shorter stride, (b) lower knee lift, (c) ball-heel-ball-toe action of the foot, (d) lower and more relaxed arm swing, (e) high kick up in the back providing it is natural, relaxed movement, (f) general overall relaxed manner.

Ten Tips on Running Form" appeared in Run Fast by Hal Higdon, Copyright 1992 by Hal Higdon Communications, all rights reserved.


TEN TIPS ON RUNNING FORM

FRED WILT WAS A DISTANCE RUNNER on the 1948 and 1952 U.S. Olympic
teams and became famous for his legendary indoor mile encounters
at that time with Wisconsin's Don Gehrmann. After retiring from
the FBI, Wilt coached the women's running teams at Purdue
University. He edited the publication Track Technique and advised
various athletes, including 1964 Olympian Buddy Edelen, who once
held the world marathon record of 2:14:28. Wilt's tips on running
form follow:

1. Running form is a completely individual issue. Each athlete
differs from every other at least to a minute extent in height,
weight, bone structure, length and size of muscles, point of
muscle origin and insertion, strength, flexibility, posture and
personality, in addition to numerous other features. Therefore, no
two runners should ever use identical form, even though they all
adhere to basic mechanical principles.

2. It is a form error of the highest magnitude to run without
permitting the heel to touch and rest on the ground with each
stride, without reservation, in a ball-heel grounding action. This
is true at all running speeds, especially sprinting.

3. It is physically possible to land heel-first in running, but
this is quite incorrect and almost never seen, since it jars the
body excessively and can be done only at very slow running speeds.
Landing heel-first and "toe running" (refusing to permit the heels
to ground) are both incorrect.

4. Ideally, the position of the feet in running is one in which
the inner borders fall approximately along a straight line.
Athletes should run in a straight line, but not necessarily on
such a line. When one foot is placed directly in front of the
other, lateral (sideways) balance is impaired.

5. Runners in races longer than sprint distance wherein economy of
energy is the paramount consideration should use a natural stride:
not exaggerated, not long, not short, but of a length in keeping
with maximum economy of effort for the running speed required.

6. Both understriding and overstriding are faults. Each runner has
his own optimum stride length at any given speed, depending upon
leg length, muscular strength and flexibility.

7. At uniform top speed with zero acceleration, if the athlete was
running in a vacuum with no wind resistance, there would be no
body lean at all. (Ozzie: I disagree with this. Use the analogy
of the broom handle balanced in the hand moving/falling/unbalanced at a
uniform speed because of the angle of lean and the person moving at the
same speed to maintain the angle of lean as constant)

8. The hands should be carried in a relaxed, cupped position at
all running speeds. They should never be rigidly clenched in a
fist while running, since this produces tension, which causes
unnecessary fatigue.

9. The head should be aligned naturally with the trunk, and the
eyes should be focused a few meters ahead while running. (Ozzie,
Again I disagree. Eyes at infinity. Peripheral vision can see
2 or 3 feet in front without looking down. Reason: The head follows
the eyes. Why the horse rider keeps the horse's head up- if it stumbles
it's less likely to fall if the head is up and balanced)

10. Usually the best solution to apparent form problems is many
repetitions of running short distances, such as 100 meters, at a
fast, though not exhausting pace. (Ozzie: Again I would add that
running slowly in good form may be better for entraining proper
movement. I took up Tai Chi: moving slower to run faster in sycn.

"Ten Tips on Running Form" appeared in Run Fast by Hal Higdon,
Copyright 1992 by Hal Higdon Communications, all rights
reserved. Autographed copies of this book are available for $16.50
(includes shipping and handling) from Roadrunner Press, P.O. Box
1034, Michigan City, IN 46361-1034.


Here's a reference book for your running library that you will use for years to come. If you want to purchase a copy of one of the books which I still use as a guide to answering questions and understanding running problems, send $15 at the address below.The $15 covers the price of the book and shipping/handling.

The book is:
Hidden Causes of Injury, Prevention And Correction, for Running Athletes and Joggers by John Jesse, 1977.

Make out the $15 check or money order to:
IAM or Int'l Assoc. of Marathoners
Attn: Ozzie Gontang
2903 29th Street
San Diego, CA 92104

Excerpt from the Intro:

"Three of the four hidden factors (of injury) - muscular imbalance, postural faults, and foot faults - are so common among the general population that it is doubtful whether any young athlete enters the field of athletic competition without being affected to a lesser or greater degree by one or more of them.

The writer (John Jesse) believes a more detailed and complete discussion of these factors and of the methods of correcting them or preventing their further development will enable the coach, trainer, and athlete jto cope with them early in the young athlete's career. It will enable the athlete to reduce to a minimum the number of roadblocks and setbacks he(she) suffers during training and in pursuit of his(her) goals.

The information presented here should be of great value to the several million physical fitness joggers and runners in the population, because the book is aimed at providing understandable answers to all injuries that interrupt their progress toward attainment of an increased level of cardiovascular fitness, or that interfere with the psychological satisfactions obtained from engaging in such activities.

The human body supports itself against gravity, segment upon segment, relying on the muscles and ligaments that cross the joints, along with postural reflexes, to maintain an erect position and proper body alignment. Hence, there has to be a total or "holistic" approach to prevention and to correction of the hidden factors mentioned above. The reader must integrate his/her thinking to a total body concept."

John Jesse was a team mate at USC with Payton Jordon who was the US Olympic head track and field coach in 1968. John wrote this book for you and me, so that we could understand through popular language, and with scientific and technical language kept to a minimum but using diagrams, illustrations or short glossaries so we the laymen could understand should we want to delve deeper.

Let's see what action this post brings! It's Ball/Heel/Ball!

Actions so far:

http://www.geocities.com/TheTropics/...63/runner.html by Pete(Y-rotation)

The typical heel striker hits the ground ahead of his center of gravity (cg) as shown in Fig. 1. The horizontal component of the impact force decelerates the runner. Although the runner's momentum overcomes the force. it does so at a cost of additional and unnecessary expenditure of energy.

In order to save energy one must eliminate the horizontal component. To do so the runner must strike the ground directly below his center of gravity (cg) as shown in Fig 2. However, to heel strike there the runner must consciously and
unnaturally turn the foot tip up as illustrated.
One can only conclude that the most efficient and natural strike in this case is the fore-foot strike.

By Miles Lakin:

I've been going through some copies of the French equivalent to RW,
"Jogging International" (mmm, something for the runners v. joggers
thread??). I've struggled to find pics that AREN'T of heel strikers!!!
Seems they're all at it :-)

I put up a post a while back about photos in Better Training for
Distance Runners which no one replied to. I will say it again - look at
fig. g on page 15 and the picture of Seb Coe on page 26. Heel-strikers?

I don't have the "Better TFDR", just "TFDR". Two shots of Coe in flight:

1) With McClean and Cram. Here Coe is in midflight, so hard to be
certain. I reckon his knee will not straighten and he'll NOT heel
strike. But it's open to debate.

2) Alone, but in a series of 3 shots with Aouita and Kristiansen.
Poetry in motion. He's definitely not going to heel strike (see my next
para).

I thought it might help this discussion if we were all looking at the
same group of pictures. Let us all be CERTAIN what we mean when we say
heel strike or midfoot strike.

I've scanned in some good pics this morning and now have them on an html
page. Trouble is I've not got a publically accessible web site. I'll

talk to the sys guys and see if they can do anything for me. Miles


Response by Ozzie

:-) Miles, Dean, Y-Rotation, Phil and others, It is a joy and makes my
heart sing to be able to dialogue w/ you about this whole Ball/Heel issue.

In 1978 I purchased a Sanyo video recorder which played in slow motion. It had a 20 minute cassette format (used in surgeries/manufacturing). It was black and white and I used it for about 6 years in teaching form and style where I could show people how they ran and by playing their running it in slo-mo.

One of the most beautiful runners I filmed was Jan Haggelbrand from
Sweden. He ran for US Int'l University and was truly a gazelle. What I
learned from him is that his running stride looked like he was hitting
heel first but when I slowed the tape down you were able to see that his c
of g was already forward on impact and that the landing was more of midsole so that by the time the foot landed it was ball/heel but quicker than the eye at
regular speed could see.

In looking at pictures, thanks for your work Miles, I realized that I
couldn't judge a heel or ball/heel landing because it is only a fraction
of time and I'd need to see the entire sequence to be able to watch.

What I did learn is that if you see an elite runner coming towards you,
you will seldom see the bottom of their shoe. With Jan Haggelbrand, you'd
see the bottom of the shoe but as he landed (as viewed from the side) you
realized that he landed midsole because he c of g. was always slightly in
front of the landing foot.

With heel strikers, you will always see the bottoms of their heels. Also
you will notice that heel strikers for the most part when seen from the
front do not lift their knees. With faster and more elite runners, most
head on shots look as if they have one leg and the other leg is cut off at
the knee as the lower leg is hidden behind the thigh. As they bring the
knee up you don't see the bottom of their shoe because as soon as the knee
is up the lower leg is coming back down.

I do believe that the dialogue as we address the issue of learning to run
be it 10 minutes/mile or 4 minutes/mile, one can use good form no matter
what speed.

In health and on the run,
Ozzie Gontang
Maintainer - rec.running FAQ
Director, San Diego Marathon Clinic, est. 1975

Mindful Running: http://www.mindfulness.com/mr.asp
http://www.faqs.org/faqs/running-faq/
  #3  
Old January 12th 04, 05:20 PM
eNo
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default BALL/HEEL/BALL Is the Correct Way To Run (1997)

"Ozzie Gontang" wrote in message
.. .
Some of the thinking and perspectives that reinforced my view on
landing midfoot or ball/heel.

Ozzie



BALL/HEEL/BALL Is the Correct Way To Run



So the majority of elite runners are doing it wrong. What a scandal!

No, elites do not land on their heels, but neither do they do the pogo-stick
impersonation with the wasteful ball/heel/ball landing. They land mid-foot
and keep on rolling.

Austin "Ozzie" Gontang, Ph.D.


With a thesis on ball/heel/ball, no doubt.

--
eNo
"Why am I here?"


  #4  
Old January 14th 04, 04:20 AM
Ozzie Gontang
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Posts: n/a
Default BALL/HEEL/BALL Is the Correct Way To Run (1997)

[[ This message was both posted and mailed: see
the "To," "Cc," and "Newsgroups" headers for details. ]]

In article , eNo
wrote:

"Ozzie Gontang" wrote in message
.. .
Some of the thinking and perspectives that reinforced my view on
landing midfoot or ball/heel.

Ozzie



BALL/HEEL/BALL Is the Correct Way To Run



So the majority of elite runners are doing it wrong. What a scandal!

No, elites do not land on their heels, but neither do they do the pogo-stick
impersonation with the wasteful ball/heel/ball landing. They land mid-foot
and keep on rolling.

Austin "Ozzie" Gontang, Ph.D.


With a thesis on ball/heel/ball, no doubt.


eNo,

I usually start people by having them march in place. The ball touches
an instant before the heel touches. If they keep lifting their knees
and inch or two as they march in place and lean from the ankle, they
are still lifting their knees and landing ball/heel or as you say flat
footed.

They are surprised that they are not lifting the body vertically.
Because many people when they run don't lift the knees, they have to
list their entire center of gravity giving as you say, the pogo stick
impersonation.

While you are correct that many top runners land midsole as their
center of gravity is over or in front of the foot as it lands.

No, no thesis on ball/heel/ball. Just one way of sharing some folklore
to assist people land more quietly on the surface of terra firma.

In health and on the run,
Ozzie Gontang
Maintainer - rec.running FAQ
Director, San Diego Marathon Clinic, est. 1975

Mindful Running: http://www.mindfulness.com/mr.asp
http://www.faqs.org/faqs/running-faq/
  #5  
Old January 14th 04, 03:17 PM
Scott Williams
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Posts: n/a
Default BALL/HEEL/BALL Is the Correct Way To Run (1997)

Ozzie,

Do they land midsole instead of flat-footed because the foot is flexing?
Or because they're landing on the lateral portion of the foot? Or both?

The FEELING of landing midsole and pushing off SEEMS to be less of a
shock than ball-heal to me. Perhaps I'm overstriding with the ball-heel,
and breaking on my heals.

I'm very curious about this, as I try to shake my shin splints.

Scott


Ozzie Gontang wrote:

[[ This message was both posted and mailed: see
the "To," "Cc," and "Newsgroups" headers for details. ]]

In article , eNo
wrote:


"Ozzie Gontang" wrote in message
...

Some of the thinking and perspectives that reinforced my view on
landing midfoot or ball/heel.

Ozzie



BALL/HEEL/BALL Is the Correct Way To Run



So the majority of elite runners are doing it wrong. What a scandal!

No, elites do not land on their heels, but neither do they do the pogo-stick
impersonation with the wasteful ball/heel/ball landing. They land mid-foot
and keep on rolling.


Austin "Ozzie" Gontang, Ph.D.


With a thesis on ball/heel/ball, no doubt.



eNo,

I usually start people by having them march in place. The ball touches
an instant before the heel touches. If they keep lifting their knees
and inch or two as they march in place and lean from the ankle, they
are still lifting their knees and landing ball/heel or as you say flat
footed.

They are surprised that they are not lifting the body vertically.
Because many people when they run don't lift the knees, they have to
list their entire center of gravity giving as you say, the pogo stick
impersonation.

While you are correct that many top runners land midsole as their
center of gravity is over or in front of the foot as it lands.

No, no thesis on ball/heel/ball. Just one way of sharing some folklore
to assist people land more quietly on the surface of terra firma.

In health and on the run,
Ozzie Gontang
Maintainer - rec.running FAQ
Director, San Diego Marathon Clinic, est. 1975

Mindful Running: http://www.mindfulness.com/mr.asp
http://www.faqs.org/faqs/running-faq/


  #6  
Old January 14th 04, 07:51 PM
Dave Carlsen
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Posts: n/a
Default BALL/HEEL/BALL Is the Correct Way To Run (1997)

Realbitchy screams "BALL ME, YOU HEEL" when his boyfriend buttfuks
him.Is that the same thing?
  #7  
Old January 15th 04, 07:45 AM
Ozzie Gontang
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default BALL/HEEL/BALL Is the Correct Way To Run (1997)

[[ This message was both posted and mailed: see
the "To," "Cc," and "Newsgroups" headers for details. ]]

In article , Scott Williams
wrote:

Ozzie,

Do they land midsole instead of flat-footed because the foot is flexing?
Or because they're landing on the lateral portion of the foot? Or both?

The FEELING of landing midsole and pushing off SEEMS to be less of a
shock than ball-heal to me. Perhaps I'm overstriding with the ball-heel,
and breaking on my heals.

I'm very curious about this, as I try to shake my shin splints.


Scott,

The landing be it ball/heel where it is almost instantaneous ball/heel,
or where it is simultaneous ball/heel or what many would call a midsole
landing or even what looks like a front of the heel/ball landing all
have one thing in common.

When the foot touches down the center of gravity is in process or has
passed beyond the foot plant. In these cases the vertical forces are
minimal. There is no deceleration as there would be in any foot plant
where the foot is in front of the center of gravity.

If I were to ask you to do anything it would be:

First, forget about pushing off. By that I mean there is little push
off, or pushing the body forward, as the body is already moved forward
and is in a sense pulling the foot/leg off the ground.

To practice running without the push off, find a hill and run up it
so that you feel no pushoff at all. When you experience that, you'll
see that the shins don't take such a beating.

Also as you run imagine that you have no toes. If you are leaning
too far forward, or if you're looking down rather than crown of the
head up and eyes on the horizon, you're having to overstretch the shins
unnecessarily.

Good luck on playing with your minimal pushoff and relaxing your toes.

Let us know how it goes.

In health and on the run,
Ozzie Gontang
Maintainer - rec.running FAQ
Director, San Diego Marathon Clinic, est. 1975

Mindful Running: http://www.mindfulness.com/mr.asp
http://www.faqs.org/faqs/running-faq/
  #8  
Old January 15th 04, 09:21 AM
Dot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default BALL/HEEL/BALL Is the Correct Way To Run (1997)

Ozzie Gontang wrote:


First, forget about pushing off. By that I mean there is little push
off, or pushing the body forward, as the body is already moved forward
and is in a sense pulling the foot/leg off the ground.

To practice running without the push off, find a hill and run up it
so that you feel no pushoff at all. When you experience that, you'll
see that the shins don't take such a beating.


As a farther thought, *if* I understand some of this stuff correctly,
it's actually the recoil of the achilles which was stretched out during
dorsiflexion while that foot is airborne that provides much of the
propulsion going forward. And I think the dorsiflexion helps the shin -
at least for me it does. If I concentrate on the dorsiflexion, I
generally have no shin pain and if a little creeps in, I dorsiflex more,
and it goes away. Landing from this position leaves me with slight
forward ankle lean, ready to go forward.

Dot

--
"Success is different things to different people"
-Bernd Heinrich in Racing the Antelope

  #9  
Old January 16th 04, 03:27 AM
Miss Anne Thrope
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default BALL/HEEL/BALL Is the Correct Way To Run (1997)

Gee, more important info from Oz on things we should have learned when
we were 12 months old. I can't wait for his "You don't have to be a
slave to your diaper" post. Right left right left...

 




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