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office workout -- push-ups



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 14th 04, 11:16 PM
willjun willjun is offline
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First recorded activity by FitnessBanter: Nov 2004
Posts: 5
Default office workout -- push-ups

Hello. Over the last few years, my job has consumed a huge portion of my life. I sit in a cubicle for 10-12 hours a day and have absolutely no time to join/go to a gym. I try to eat healthy and find myself walking laps around the office just to keep for losing my mind. About 6 months ago I started doing standard push-ups's in an empty cubicle to release some energy. I began doing them every day/six days a week. One set per day. When I started, I was able to get about 18 push-ups in one go. Now, 6 months later I'm able to do 40 push-ups in one set. I've cut down to 5 days per week now (every day Monday through Friday) and practically sleep all weekend due to my crazy work hours. I've noticed a difference in my chest, biceps, triceps, shoulders, and back. Now, I've got a real feel for pushing myself and I look forward to the moment each day when I can sneak away during my boss' daily meeting to do my push-ups. I would like to take weight training to another level with weights, etc but honestly, it'll be at least 3 years before I'll see a change in my work schedule. So, it looks like push-up's are my best/only option to build muscle, etc. Like I said above, I basically do the same type of push up's every day...5 days a week...one set. I'd like to expand this routine and build some sort of regular workout around push-ups and other things I might be able to do in a cubicle without any weights. I'm hoping someone here might be able to make some suggestions or point me to a good book or web site. I'm interested in building my upper body as much as I can.
Also, what type of results can I expect to get if I continue to add quantity to my daily push-ups. I'm guessing muscles grow differently if you're simply adding reps and not really increasing the weight you're lifting. Do I need to worry about rest periods since I'm doing these push-up's every day Monday through Friday. Any/all help will be much appreciated. Thanks!
Will

PS...In addition to push-ups I walk back and forth to work every day. 40 minute walk one way.

Last edited by willjun : November 14th 04 at 11:21 PM.
  #2  
Old November 15th 04, 09:18 AM
Per Elmsäter
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Posts: n/a
Default

willjun wrote:

PS...In addition to push-ups I walk back and forth to work every day.
40 minute walk one way.


Why don't you use part of those 80 minutes you're walking to go to a gym
instead.

--
Perre
I gave up on SPAM and redirected it to hotmail instead.


  #3  
Old November 15th 04, 01:39 PM
willjun willjun is offline
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First recorded activity by FitnessBanter: Nov 2004
Posts: 5
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Per Elmsäter
Why don't you use part of those 80 minutes you're walking to go to a gym
instead.
I would if I could, but the morning walk is spent walking with my son to school, and the evening walk is spent walking home with my wife. Quality time

Any ideas about a workout centered around push-up's, etc at the office?
  #4  
Old November 15th 04, 06:10 PM
Steve Freides
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Posts: n/a
Default

"willjun" wrote in message
...

Hello. Over the last few years, my job has consumed a huge portion of
my life. I sit in a cubicle for 10-12 hours a day and have absolutely
no time to join/go to a gym. I try to eat healthy and find myself
walking laps around the office just to keep for losing my mind. About
6 months ago I started doing standard push-ups's in an empty cubicle
to
release some energy. I began doing them every day/six days a week.
One
set per day. When I started, I was able to get about 18 push-ups in
one
go. Now, 6 months later I'm able to do 40 push-ups in one set. I've
cut down to 5 days per week now (every day Monday through Friday) and
practically sleep all weekend due to my crazy work hours. I've
noticed
a difference in my chest, biceps, triceps, shoulders, and back. Now,
I've got a real feel for pushing myself and I look forward to the
moment each day when I can sneak away during my boss' daily meeting to
do my push-ups. I would like to take weight training to another level
with weights, etc but honestly, it'll be at least 3 years before I'll
see a change in my work schedule. So, it looks like push-up's are my
best/only option to build muscle, etc. Like I said above, I basically
do the same type of push up's every day...5 days a week...one set.
I'd
like to expand this routine and build some sort of regular workout
around push-ups and other things I might be able to do in a cubicle
without any weights. I'm hoping someone here might be able to make
some suggestions or point me to a good book or web site. I'm
interested in building my upper body as much as I can.
Also, what type of results can I expect to get if I continue to add
quantity to my daily push-ups. I'm guessing muscles grow differently
if you're simply adding reps and not really increasing the weight
you're lifting. Do I need to worry about rest periods since I'm doing
these push-up's every day Monday through Friday. Any/all help will be
much appreciated. Thanks!
Will

PS...In addition to push-ups I walk back and forth to work every day.
40 minute walk one way.


One can build strength using only bodyweight - the one-legged squat and
the one-armed pushup are great for this. See Pavel's "Naked Warrior"
book for lots of details including working up to both these exercise,
suggested workout schedules, at the like - http://www.kbnj.com/nw.htm.
You can also find a lot of information about both exercise for free on
the Internet - the one-legged squat is often called the "pistol" so
search on that as well. Whatever you do, you should add leg work of
some kind to your program, even if it's only two-legged squats for reps.
Squat thrusts would be another option. Read the reviews of the book as
you scroll down the web page - you'll get a better idea of what it's
about.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com


  #5  
Old November 15th 04, 06:50 PM
ff123
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Posts: n/a
Default

On Mon, 15 Nov 2004 13:39:19 +0000, willjun
wrote:


Per Elmsäter Wrote:

Why don't you use part of those 80 minutes you're walking to go to a
gym
instead.


I would if I could, but the morning walk is spent walking with my son
to school, and the evening walk is spent walking home with my wife.
Quality time

Any ideas about a workout centered around push-up's, etc at the office?


Well, the real issue is about what you find important enough to make
time for, isn't it? After you decide that, the rest comes a lot more
easily.

But if you insist on an office only workout, I would chime in along
with Steve that you need to work legs. How about dumbbell squats?
And some upper body pulling -- dumbbell rows? Dumbbells are allowed
in your building, I assume (no offense intended). Don't neglect
flexibility.

ff123
  #6  
Old November 16th 04, 04:47 PM
willjun willjun is offline
Junior Member
 
First recorded activity by FitnessBanter: Nov 2004
Posts: 5
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ff123
On Mon, 15 Nov 2004 13:39:19 +0000, willjun
wrote:


Per Elmsäter Wrote:

Why don't you use part of those 80 minutes you're walking to go to a
gym
instead.


I would if I could, but the morning walk is spent walking with my son
to school, and the evening walk is spent walking home with my wife.
Quality time

Any ideas about a workout centered around push-up's, etc at the office?


Well, the real issue is about what you find important enough to make
time for, isn't it? After you decide that, the rest comes a lot more
easily.

But if you insist on an office only workout, I would chime in along
with Steve that you need to work legs. How about dumbbell squats?
And some upper body pulling -- dumbbell rows? Dumbbells are allowed
in your building, I assume (no offense intended). Don't neglect
flexibility.

ff123
Thanks for the tips. The Naked Warrior looks interesting. I took a brief look and will read more tonight.

Well, I have been thinking about it, and am considering joining a gym (there a small weight room in a rec center across the street from my apartment which I just found out about). Like I said, I've only been doing push-up's and walking/cycling. I'm 29. 6 foot tall, 169 pounds.
If I were to start lifting, I'm really hoping I can get some tips from members on this site. The rec center that I'll have access to is small and so there won't be anyone around for me to ask dumb newbie questions to. Basically, I'm interested in building up my upper body (chest, arms, shoulders, back, etc.) I figure I'll have about 45 - 60 minutes 3 days per week in the mornings to lift (On the remaining 2 week days I have access to a stationary bike here at work which I use for 45 minutes at lunch. And my weekends, well, they're out of the question entirely!)

Can anyone recommend a definitive book/video that shows the proper form used on various lifting exercises? Recommendations on how many times per week to lift? What to do on each day? When to add pounds to an exercise? Is it better to do more reps with less weight? Or add more weight and do less reps? How many sets? When/what to eat? How to warm up? Cool down? The basics. I took a look around the posts in this forum and there's lots of info. Some is very useful, some seems subjective. I'm really interested in taking my workouts to a new level. I really enjoy pushing myself physically. Any recommendations on where to begin? I want to maximize results but I don't want to hurt myself or work against myself. Any info or suggestions would be greatly appreciated!! Thanks!!
Scott

Last edited by willjun : November 16th 04 at 04:52 PM.
  #7  
Old November 16th 04, 05:17 PM
Another nobody
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Posts: n/a
Default



Try doing the push-ups with your feet elevated on a chair.

  #8  
Old November 16th 04, 06:17 PM
Steve Freides
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"willjun" wrote in message
...

ff123 Wrote:
On Mon, 15 Nov 2004 13:39:19 +0000, willjun
wrote:
-

Per Elmsäter Wrote:-

Why don't you use part of those 80 minutes you're walking to go to a
gym
instead.
-

I would if I could, but the morning walk is spent walking with my son
to school, and the evening walk is spent walking home with my wife.
Quality time

Any ideas about a workout centered around push-up's, etc at the
office?-

Well, the real issue is about what you find important enough to make
time for, isn't it? After you decide that, the rest comes a lot more
easily.

But if you insist on an office only workout, I would chime in along
with Steve that you need to work legs. How about dumbbell squats?
And some upper body pulling -- dumbbell rows? Dumbbells are allowed
in your building, I assume (no offense intended). Don't neglect
flexibility.

ff123


Thanks for the tips. The Naked Warrior looks interesting. I took a
brief look and will read more tonight.

Well, I have been thinking about it, and am considering joining a gym
(there a small weight room in a rec center across the street from my
apartment which I just found out about). Like I said, I've only been
doing push-up's and walking/cycling. I'm 29. 6 foot tall, 169
pounds.

If I were to start lifting, I'm really hoping I can get some tips from
members on this site. The rec center that I'll have access to is
small
and so there won't be anyone around for me to ask dumb newbie
questions
to. Basically, I'm interested in building up my upper body (chest,
arms, shoulders, back, etc.) I figure I'll have about 45 - 60 minutes
3
days per week in the mornings to lift (On the remaining 2 week days I
have access to a stationary bike here at work which I use for 45
minutes at lunch. And my weekends, well, they're out of the question
entirely!)

Can anyone recommend a definitive book/video that shows the proper
form
used on various lifting exercises? Recommendations on how many times
per week to lift? What to do on each day? When to add pounds to an
exercise? Is it better to do more reps with less weight? Or add more
weight and do less reps? How many sets? When/what to eat? How to
warm up? Cool down? The basics. I took a look around the posts in
this forum and there's lots of info. Some is very useful, some seems
subjective. I'm really interested in taking my workouts to a new
level. I really enjoy pushing myself physically. Any recommendations
on where to begin? I want to maximize results but I don't want to
hurt
myself or work against myself. Any info or suggestions would be
greatly
appreciated!! Thanks!!
Scott


Building strength and building size require different approaches,
although sometimes working on one will get you some of the other. There
is no definitive set/rep scheme that works for everyone for all goals.
Generally speaking, more reps (up to a point) per set will focus more on
size, as will shorter rest periods between sets and more days between
working the same muscles. Short sets which will allow for heavier
weights - that plus longer rests between sets and training more days per
week will focus more on strength. If you're trying to gain muscle, be
sure to eat enough and expect to gain a little fat along the way.
Krista's site,
http://www.stumptuous.com/weights.html, has a lot of good
info, and I've already pointed you to my site and the DragonDoor site
which take a different approach. Try http://www.exrx.net for exercise
specifics, use Google and look up "hypertrophy-specific training" for
more on gaining size.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com


  #9  
Old November 16th 04, 06:29 PM
Per Elmsäter
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Steve Freides wrote:
use Google and look up "hypertrophy-specific training" for
more on gaining size.


What would be the opposite of "hypertrophy-specific training"? Ie to gain as
much strength as possible with as little mass gain as possible.

--
Perre
I gave up on SPAM and redirected it to hotmail instead.


  #10  
Old November 16th 04, 06:43 PM
Lee Michaels
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Per Elmsäter" wrote

Steve Freides wrote:
use Google and look up "hypertrophy-specific training" for
more on gaining size.


What would be the opposite of "hypertrophy-specific training"? Ie to gain

as
much strength as possible with as little mass gain as possible.


Anorexia Nervosa.

Starve yourself into a near death state.

Practiced by many young women and models.




 




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