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Study finds weightlifting link to glaucoma



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 12th 06, 03:28 PM posted to sci.med.vision,misc.fitness.weights,sci.med,misc.consumers
[email protected]
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Posts: 1
Default Study finds weightlifting link to glaucoma

Study finds weightlifting link to glaucoma

CHICAGO, Sept 11 (Reuters) - Holding your breath while weightlifting
causes temporary increases in eye pressure that could raise the risk of
developing one form of glaucoma, according to a study published on
Monday.

Researchers at the Catholic University of Brasilia in Brazil said they
reached the conclusion with a test of 30 men aged 18 to 40 whose
intraocular (in the eye) pressure was measured while they were bench
pressing.

None had glaucoma; but the study, published in the September issue of
Archives of Ophthalmology, found that eye pressure increased during the
breath-holding done as part of the training.

It said normal-tension glaucoma is more common in individuals who are
subjected to frequent changes in eye pressure. That variety of glaucoma
is one where the eye disease develops even though eye pressure when
measured in routine checks appears to be normal.

It is also more common among people who play high-resistance wind
instruments or those with asthma or intestinal or urinary tract
obstructions that cause them to strain in a way that increases eye
pressure.

"Prolonged weightlifting could be a potential risk factor for the
development or progression of glaucoma. Intermittent intraocular
pressure increases during weightlifting should be suspected in patients
with normal-tension glaucoma who perform such exercises," the authors
concluded.

The increased eye pressure that marks glaucoma damages the optic nerve
leading to sight loss and possible blindness.

SOURCES: Vieira, G. Archives of Ophthalmology, September 2006; vol 124:
pp 1251-1254. News release, JAMA/Archives.

  #2  
Old September 12th 06, 03:55 PM posted to sci.med.vision,misc.fitness.weights,sci.med,misc.consumers
Jim Chinnis
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Posts: 1
Default Study finds weightlifting link to glaucoma

wrote in part:

Study finds weightlifting link to glaucoma


Not much of a study. Looks like nonsense at this point.
--
Jim Chinnis Warrenton, Virginia, USA
  #6  
Old September 12th 06, 05:11 PM posted to sci.med.vision,misc.fitness.weights
geek_girl
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Posts: 164
Default Study finds weightlifting link to glaucoma

Jim wrote:
Jim Chinnis wrote in
:

wrote in part:

Study finds weightlifting link to glaucoma


Not much of a study. Looks like nonsense at this point.


Well, people don't like to hear anything upsetting if it applies to their
own recreation.


It's not at all upsetting, because at this point it seems like no more
than speculation. In any case, most of us (us being the longtime
lifters in mfw) have accepted that there are risks to heavy lifting,
but we feel that the benefits outweigh the risks.

The concept seems reasonable enough to me, since the "eye-
popping" effect is easy to feel. Weightlifting (vs. "hard labor" or body-
weight exercises) may not be natural for the human system. Farm work used
to keep the populace in shape and it rarely involved the peak stresses of
weight training.


Umm. What? Have you ever actually done any manual labor? Or even seen
it occur? If anything, lifting real world objects is *more* difficult
than lifting gym weights. They tend to be more awkward and harder to
grip than dumbbells or barbells. Furthermore, most of us only lift for
an hour or so at a time. Laborers lift things all day long.

As for what's "natural" for the human body, there's quite a bit of
evidence that our prehistoric ancestors were, in general, far stronger
than modern humans. Higher bone density indicates higher loading, i.e.
they lifted heavy things on a regular basis.

  #7  
Old September 12th 06, 05:13 PM posted to sci.med.vision,misc.fitness.weights
geek_girl
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 164
Default Study finds weightlifting link to glaucoma

Jim wrote:
Jim Chinnis wrote in
:

wrote in part:

Study finds weightlifting link to glaucoma


Not much of a study. Looks like nonsense at this point.


Well, people don't like to hear anything upsetting if it applies to their
own recreation.


It's not at all upsetting, because at this point it seems like no more
than speculation. In any case, most of us (us being the longtime
lifters in mfw) have accepted that there are risks to heavy lifting,
but we feel that the benefits outweigh the risks.

The concept seems reasonable enough to me, since the "eye-
popping" effect is easy to feel. Weightlifting (vs. "hard labor" or body-
weight exercises) may not be natural for the human system. Farm work used
to keep the populace in shape and it rarely involved the peak stresses of
weight training.


Umm. What? Have you ever actually done any manual labor? Or even seen
it occur? If anything, lifting real world objects is *more* difficult
than lifting gym weights. They tend to be more awkward and harder to
grip than dumbbells or barbells. Furthermore, most of us only lift for
an hour or so at a time. Laborers lift things all day long.

As for what's "natural" for the human body, there's quite a bit of
evidence that our prehistoric ancestors were, in general, far stronger
than modern humans. Higher bone density indicates higher loading, i.e.
they lifted heavy things on a regular basis.

  #8  
Old September 12th 06, 05:41 PM posted to sci.med.vision,misc.fitness.weights
Jim
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Posts: 4
Default Study finds weightlifting link to glaucoma

"geek_girl" wrote in
oups.com:

Jim wrote:
Jim Chinnis wrote in
:

wrote in part:

Study finds weightlifting link to glaucoma

Not much of a study. Looks like nonsense at this point.


Well, people don't like to hear anything upsetting if it applies to
their own recreation.


It's not at all upsetting, because at this point it seems like no more
than speculation. In any case, most of us (us being the longtime
lifters in mfw) have accepted that there are risks to heavy lifting,
but we feel that the benefits outweigh the risks.


And people would never deny anthropogenic global warming just because they
like big cars, or cancer risks just because they like smoking? That's all
I'm getting at. Several people denounced the study right off the bat
without even reading it.

The concept seems reasonable enough to me, since the "eye-
popping" effect is easy to feel. Weightlifting (vs. "hard labor" or
body- weight exercises) may not be natural for the human system. Farm
work used to keep the populace in shape and it rarely involved the
peak stresses of weight training.


Umm. What? Have you ever actually done any manual labor? Or even seen
it occur? If anything, lifting real world objects is *more* difficult
than lifting gym weights. They tend to be more awkward and harder to
grip than dumbbells or barbells. Furthermore, most of us only lift for
an hour or so at a time. Laborers lift things all day long.


I worked for two moving companies when younger, and it's still not the
_extreme_ "bulging" pressure you experience when doing the final few reps
in a set, assuming you're lifting heavy weight with lower reps. Heavy work
tends to focus the pressure over more of the body vs. a specific muscle
group. There are degrees of manual labor. Some of it could certainly be
hard on the eyes too.

As for what's "natural" for the human body, there's quite a bit of
evidence that our prehistoric ancestors were, in general, far stronger
than modern humans. Higher bone density indicates higher loading, i.e.
they lifted heavy things on a regular basis.


Please read the actual study I linked to. It's got graphs and a lot more
info than the news items. They have documented more glaucoma among players
of certain wind instruments. They just need to prove it with a deliberate
survey of weightlifters. I doubt it's too much of a concern for the less
extreme lifters.

Jim
  #9  
Old September 12th 06, 05:59 PM posted to sci.med.vision,misc.fitness.weights
JMW
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,436
Default Study finds weightlifting link to glaucoma

Jim wrote:

Jim Chinnis wrote:

wrote in part:

Study finds weightlifting link to glaucoma


Not much of a study. Looks like nonsense at this point.


Well, people don't like to hear anything upsetting if it applies to their
own recreation. The concept seems reasonable enough to me, since the "eye-
popping" effect is easy to feel. Weightlifting (vs. "hard labor" or body-
weight exercises) may not be natural for the human system. Farm work used
to keep the populace in shape and it rarely involved the peak stresses of
weight training.

The study's emphasis is that people predisposed to glaucoma could increase
their risk. They cite a known correlation between "normal-tension
glaucoma" and the playing of "high-resistance" wind instruments. It all
stands to reason.

They need to follow up and track the incidence of glaucoma among the
weightlifting population. If the study seems superficial on news sites,
here are the details:

http://archopht.ama-assn.org/cgi/con...ull/124/9/1251


And you'll probably get more eye-popping Valsalvic pressure from a
good case of constipation.

BTW, if you actually think that farm work doesn't involve Valsalva
maneuvers in the heavy lifting, then you've never done heavy manual
labor.
  #10  
Old September 12th 06, 08:05 PM posted to sci.med.vision,misc.fitness.weights
geek_girl
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 164
Default Study finds weightlifting link to glaucoma

Jim wrote:
"geek_girl" wrote in
oups.com:

Jim wrote:
Jim Chinnis wrote in
:

wrote in part:

Study finds weightlifting link to glaucoma

Not much of a study. Looks like nonsense at this point.

Well, people don't like to hear anything upsetting if it applies to
their own recreation.


It's not at all upsetting, because at this point it seems like no more
than speculation. In any case, most of us (us being the longtime
lifters in mfw) have accepted that there are risks to heavy lifting,
but we feel that the benefits outweigh the risks.


And people would never deny anthropogenic global warming just because they
like big cars, or cancer risks just because they like smoking? That's all
I'm getting at. Several people denounced the study right off the bat
without even reading it.


How do you know they didn't read it?


The concept seems reasonable enough to me, since the "eye-
popping" effect is easy to feel. Weightlifting (vs. "hard labor" or
body- weight exercises) may not be natural for the human system. Farm
work used to keep the populace in shape and it rarely involved the
peak stresses of weight training.


Umm. What? Have you ever actually done any manual labor? Or even seen
it occur? If anything, lifting real world objects is *more* difficult
than lifting gym weights. They tend to be more awkward and harder to
grip than dumbbells or barbells. Furthermore, most of us only lift for
an hour or so at a time. Laborers lift things all day long.


I worked for two moving companies when younger, and it's still not the
_extreme_ "bulging" pressure you experience when doing the final few reps
in a set, assuming you're lifting heavy weight with lower reps.


That's depends on what you're moving, and how many people are carrying
it, and how strong you and they are, doesn't it? If you're lifting near
or at your max, regardless of whether you're lifting a barbell or a
sleeper sofa, you're likely to be doing a Valsalva. Perhaps you and
your coworkers were very strong, and/or there were a lot of you.

Heavy work
tends to focus the pressure over more of the body vs. a specific muscle
group. There are degrees of manual labor. Some of it could certainly be
hard on the eyes too.


Well, this is assuming that heavy lifting really is "hard on the eyes".
In either case, does this mean you're withdrawing your apparent blanket
assertion that "hard labor" isn't the same as lifting weights?


As for what's "natural" for the human body, there's quite a bit of
evidence that our prehistoric ancestors were, in general, far stronger
than modern humans. Higher bone density indicates higher loading, i.e.
they lifted heavy things on a regular basis.


Please read the actual study I linked to. It's got graphs and a lot more
info than the news items. They have documented more glaucoma among players
of certain wind instruments. They just need to prove it with a deliberate
survey of weightlifters. I doubt it's too much of a concern for the less
extreme lifters.


I was simply addressing your statement that the stresses of lifting
weights are not "natural". It's likely that although lifting weights is
contrived, the stresses are quite similar to those under which we
evolved. Who knows, maybe it's "natural" for people to eventually
develop glaucoma.

 




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